Can I specify who gets an email notification with Gravity Forms?

You can send multiple emails with a form submission, including one to an email value from the form. The email is HTML-only (rather than multi-part mime), but you can customize the email content through the GUI with field value placeholders.

Currently in the environment, customizing the From field is not possible. That always comes from wordpress@princeton.edu. The Reply To field can be customized, though.

How long will my site stay up?

As long as your site is active and does not violate University policies, we will continue to host your site. However, if your site has been inactive for three (3) years, we reserve the right to remove your site from our servers.

We ask that each site request designates an administrative contact and a technical contact. These designated individuals become the site owner(s). Before deleting an inactive site, we will attempt to contact a site owner. If none of the designated site owners are still with the University, we will contact another individual within the administrative contact’s former department. If your site has a sponsor organization, such as the Office of the Dean of Undergraduate Students or Princeton in Asia, we will also coordinate with that organization.

With the site owner, we will discuss options for archiving an inactive site’s content before removing it from our servers.

Can I add my own plugins and themes?

The production WordPress servers are locked down, secure environments.

Web Development Services tests all themes and plugins for security problems, compatibility problems, user experience issues, and performance issues before deploying them to the live servers.

With over 16,000 plugins and 1,400 themes on WordPress.org alone, not all of them play nicely with each other or with the latest version of WordPress. Not all are designed for a multisite environment, and some can kill performance on high traffic servers.

WordPress, itself, and all plugins and themes are uploaded to a separate version-controlled repository, then deployed via scripts to the QA and production web servers. This allows us to roll back to a previous version of the environment with a single command if we discover a problematic plugin or theme.

We tried to mimic many of WordPress.com’s features, and we have added many other plugins based on early feedback.

To simplify the interface for casual users, not all plugins are activated across the network. Site administrators can activate certain plugins just for their site. These include a Poll/Survey plugin, an FAQ plugin, and a LaTeX plugin.

We welcome suggestions for added functionality and new themes to add to our WordPress environment. Please use the Contact link above.

Where can I learn WordPress?

The WordPress Codex is the official documentation site for WordPress.

The University purchased a site license for the entire Lynda.com online training library, which includes over 20 hours of WordPress 3 training. Visit lynda.princeton.edu and log in with your Princeton net ID to access their library from anywhere.

We also have a University-wide license for Safari Books Online. This service has at least a dozen books dedicated to WordPress 3.

This website, blogs.princeton.edu, will be a resource for training materials that are specific to our environment, including plugin-specific tutorials.