The Importance of Reading

With reading period upon us I thought that it might be appropriate to remind the diligent young minds of Princeton University about the importance of minding their books.

Dean & Son, the prodigious 19th Century London publishing firm, brings us a very short story about a certain ill-behaved Sam Weld who never quite learns his lesson.  The story comes from one of Dean & Son’s “English Struwelpeters”, a series of cloth books inspired by the smash hit moral tale Der Struwwelpeter by the German author Heinrich Hoffman. From the last 2 leaves of Little Miss Consequence comes the cautionary tale: “The Naughty Boy Who Destroyed His Books”.

 

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Cover: Little Miss Consequnce (bib id 8257200) Item still in process.

Cover: Little Miss Consequence (London, Dean & Son, 1858?) Item still in process.

Good luck studying! Remember to treat you books well and read . . . or you might become a swineherd!

Suggested Menu Item for a Super Bowl Party from a Children’s Book ??????

Overindulgence doesn’t end with the 12th day of Christmas, it wraps up with the obligatory spread on Super Bowl Sunday.   To usher out the holiday season, we offer up a seasonal story with a recipe in the spirit of Kate Greenaway Award winner Helen Cooper’s Pumpkin Soup picture book trilogy.

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We can’t vouch for the veracity of The Wonderful History of the Great Sausage (New York: James Miller, ca. 1880).  But it seems likely that it was translated from an illustrated German-language children’s book or Die Fliegende Blatter, like Schwind’s “Trials of Sir Winter” featured in the previous post.   And it is our considered opinion that the charcuterie in the story must have been a hard smoked sausage if it required a saw to slice.

A recipe from an extremely tattered 1967 printing of The Joy of Cooking follows, just in case one of our loyal followers will be inspired to substitute a Wunderwurst for Buffalo wings at their spread for Super Bowl XLIX…   The recipe will have to be multiplied many times to produce a 1005-yard sausage weighing eight thousand, eight hundred and eighty eight pound, but maybe someone from the world of competitive sausage making can be enlisted to lend a hand.  This is surely a manageable project in comparison to surpassing the  the longest sausage on record (five miles long but of ordinary girth).

Hard Sausage:

Have ready: 2 ½ lbs of peeled potatoes. Cook 12 minutes, drain, and cool overnight covered. 

Grind three times: 2 ½ lbs of top round of beef, 2 ½ lbs of lean pork, and 2 ½ lbs of small-diced pork fat.  Mix with 2 tablespoons of salt, 1 tsp saltpeter, and 2 teaspoons of coarsely ground pepper.

Grind the cooked potatoes once and add to the meat.  Work together until well mixed.  Put into sausage casing and smoke. After smoking, hang in a cool dry place, about 1 to 2 months to cure.

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Thanks to the remote researcher who sent the query that caused us to stumble across this tale and “Sir Winter” (January 30 2014 post) in the Cotsen Collection, both of which seemed too good to keep to ourselves.