Category Archives: Featured

Introduction to Text Encoding and TEI

Time: Wednesday, January 29, 2:00pm – 4:00pm
Location: HRC Classroom, East Pyne Room 012, Lower Level
Instructors: Clifford Wulfman and Ben Johnston

What’s with all the pointy brackets???

Screen Shot 2014-01-14 at 3.17.17 PM

A diary entry from poet Robert Graves, “Getting started using TEI” http://tei.oucs.ox.ac.uk/GettingStarted/html/in.html

Text encoding involves rendering transcriptions of documents (books, newspapers, magazines, manuscripts, engravings, and so on) into machine-readable form, so that they may be processed by computers in a variety of ways. Most of us are familiar with word-processing programs that create encoded texts for printing; and many of us have heard about HTML, a way of marking up, or annotating, a text for display on the World Wide Web.

What most people don’t know is that text markup has uses far beyond simple presentation (formatting and print layout). It can be used to support fundamental scholarly practices like glossing, annotation, linking, and other kinds of semantic analysis and interpretation, making the scholar’s intellectual work readable by machines.

(To register for the workshop click here, or access the QR code)qrcode Continue reading for more information

NEW! Workshop Series: Statistical Computing with R

R is the de facto standard for statistical analysis in a wide range of disciplines such as computational biology, finance, sociology, political science and digital humanities. This two-part workshop will help participants to get started with R’s abilities, ranging from data structure to visualization. Designed for students without any programming experience, this course will better prepare you for introductory statistics courses and quantitative research at Princeton.

Dates10/9  Part 1: Introductory Workshop in Statistical Computing with R
            11/13 – Part 2: Intermediate Workshop in Statistical Computing with R
Time: Wednesdays, 7pm – 9pm
Location: New Media Center (NMC), 1st Floor, Lewis Science Library

To Register for the workshop series, please fill out the registration form here. Or access the form via the QR code to the right. Limited space available.qrfree.kaywa.com

 

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The Productive Scholar: Janet Temos on Clickers in the Classroom

Thursday, December 13, 12:00 noon
East Pyne Room 012
Classroom feedback/response

Janet Temos

Asking your students questions and getting instant responses is a great way of assessing whether learning and understanding is taking place. Come learn how you can use clickers in the class­room to do quick assessments.

About the speaker:

Janet Temos is the Direc­tor of the Educational Technologies Center at Princeton. She is a member of the Princeton class of 1982, and received her PhD at Princeton in 2001. The ETC helps faculty use technology in teaching and research, and includes Blackboard, the New Media Center, the Humanities Resource Center. We also offer consulting, training and outreach in educational technologies.


In her session on Classroom Clickers, Temos started with a common question that many faculty have: “What are Clickers?”

iClicker Clicker+

iClicker’s Clicker+

For this talk, Temos focused mostly on “mechanical” or hardware based clickers, though software based response systems exist. Mechanical clickers are plastic, wireless devices with buttons for an audience to show a response. The photo (left) is an example clicker similar to the ones offered at Princeton. These interface wirelessly with a paired receiver connected to a computer. The facilitator sets this system up to track responses. You might be most familiar with the system from game shows, such as the “Lifeline” feature from Who Wants to Be a Millionaire, where the audience responds with their beliefs about the best answer. Most often at Princeton, we use clickers as an immediate student response system, a way for students to give trackable, chartable responses to a given question so that a faculty member can gain understanding about student comprehension or beliefs. Temos explained that they are also sometimes used as an animal training system, a method for tracking attendance, and are sometimes also called a personal response system.

According to Temos, clickers are best suited for large classes, questions that have answers based on opinion or newly delivered information, and class sessions that allow for some time to consider the question fully.

Here is an example of in-class use by Eric Mazur at Harvard in which he asks students to respond to a question about physics, and after seeing their response results as a class, he asks them to discuss and explain their answer choice with the students next to them, then answer the question again, allowing Mazur to assess changes in understanding and focus his teaching for improved clarity and understanding.

(Harvard Magazine on YouTube)

We learned that some of the benefits of clickers include the ability to offer a pause to a challenging lecture, an opportunity for audience feedback, and an opportunity for energy release, or a way to break tension. You can use instant feedback to add levity to an otherwise serious or heavy discussion. Perhaps most importantly, clickers offer a great opportunity to check student understanding of difficult topics before moving on to other topics that need that understanding.

Temos explained that clickers are not necessarily the best way to do a survey, quiz or poll. The synchronous nature of the immediate feedback may affect a survey by having the responses influence a typically personal experience. For example, in a clicker based poll about scheduling, a student may want to have their alternate class meeting on Tuesdays, but since the clicker responses show everyone else choosing Thursdays, they may ignore their own needs. In a typical asynchronous survey using paper or an electronic form, the student would be more likely to answer as they truly feel. Immediate feedback is the most important consideration in deciding to use clickers, so in situations where the question benefits from knowing the answer right away, clickers are a great solution.

Here are some things to consider about how to get them at Princeton:

  1. OIT lends them for one-time anonymous polling in a course.
  2. There is no charge for borrowing, but loans are given on a first-come first-served basis.
  3. Courses have priority over administrative or other use.

For long-term use, like if you’d like to use clickers for the entire semester, you might ask your academic department to purchase clickers for departmental use. You can also assign clickers as course materials, and simply ask your students to buy them at the bookstore as required materials. Note that integration with Blackboard is now better than it has been in the past, and allows for easy association between students and clickers. Also, if you are not looking for clickers for a course and you need 400 clickers for a large single event, you can even rent them.

Other methods you might consider instead of clickers for asynchronous feedback:

  • Use Blackboard quizzes surveys and tests
  • Course blogs with live polls. (Using Pinion or PollDaddy)
  • Google Forms
  • Qualtrics, Princeton’s Survey and poll tool
  • Live back-channeling with social media tools, like Twitter.

Why did Princeton choose iClicker as a student response system?

iClicker offers a blended solution, and allows you to mix physical clickers with an online response system. Also, most online responses systems mandate student fees, which we try to avoid. Borrowed clickers are free for students and faculty at Princeton. We have about 200 on offer for loans.

For more information about iClicker, instant feedback solutions at Princeton, or other instructional technology issues, please contact Educational Technologies Center at Princeton. 

A screencast of Janet’s talk is coming soon.

The Productive Scholar logo

The Productive Scholar: Ben Johnston on Kaltura Media at Princeton

The Productive Scholar logo

The Productive Scholar logo

Thursday, December 6
12:00 noon
East Pyne Room 012
Kaltura Media
Ben Johnston

Click here to sign-up for this hands-on training*

Putting up video and audio resources for your students is a great way to extend their understanding of a given topic. Come learn how to use Princeton’s Kaltura service to upload audio and video and make it available to your students.

*If you have trouble with the link, copy the following URL into your web browser: https://wass.princeton.edu/pages/viewcalendar.page.php?makeapp=1&cal_id=1325&block_id=72690

About the speaker:
Ben Johnston is Senior Instructional Technologist in the Educational Technologies Center and Manager of the Humanities Resource Center at Princeton University. He holds a Master’s degree in Education from Teachers College, Columbia University and has worked at Princeton since 2006.

Here is Ben’s presentation (PPT) on Kaltura:

Productive Scholar Kaltura Presentation

Lunch & Learn logo

Lunch and Learn: Brady, Johnston and Temos: Tablets in the Classroom

Lunch & Learn logo

Lunch & Learn logo

Wednesday December 5
12:00 noon
Frist Multipurpose Room B
Tablets in the Classroom
Angel Brady, Ben Johnston, Janet Temos

Congratulations! You recently purchased a tablet and you are enjoying all its capabilities and productive apps. Now, you are wondering how you can use this device inside your classroom. This Lunch and Learn will discuss apps you can use for lecturing and presenting with your tablet device.

If you are interested in getting updates, video or other information about this session, please register here.*

*If you have trouble with the link, copy the following URL into your web browser: https://wass.princeton.edu/pages/viewcalendar.page.php?makeapp=1&cal_id=1756&block_id=83168

About the speakers: Angel Brady is an Educational Technologist at the Humanities Resource Center at Princeton University. Prior to coming to Princeton, she was an Instructional Technologist and Training Specialist at Rider University. She earned her Master’s of Science in Biomedical Visualization from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Ben Johnston is Senior Instructional Technologist in the Educational Technologies Center and Manager of the Humanities Resource Center at Princeton University.  He holds a Master’s degree in Education from Teachers College, Columbia University and has worked at Princeton since 2006.

Janet Temos is the Director of the Educational Technologies Center at Princeton. She is a member of the Princeton class of 1982, and received her PhD at Princeton in 2001. The ETC helps faculty use technology in teaching and research, and includes Blackboard, the New Media Center, the Humanities Resource Center. We also offer consulting, training and outreach in educational technologies.

Materials from this session follow:

The “Doceri” presentation from this session:
DoceriSupplement_LnL12_5_12

The “tablets” presentation from this session:
https://docs.google.com/presentation/pub?id=1Fr5tzfe00nA9gBWH0IzH0OAyv4oegCI9mYsvCg1AsmQ&start=false&loop=false&delayms=3000#slide=id.p

Audio from this session:

The first part of the presentation in screencast: