Category Archives: Tech Spotlights

Tech Spotlight: Ben Johnston on Digital Humanities

February 21, 2012: Technology Spotlight – Ben Johnston on Digital Humanities

In this session on the digital humanities, Ben goes over the definition, examples, and best practices in digital humanities, or the digital study of the human condition. Highlights include an overview of the Whitman Archive, image collection analysis, and encoding of text and semantic metadata, such as the implementation of  Text Encoding Initiative, or TEI markup. Watch the video below to see the entire presentation.

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ETC offerings for the week of February 12, 2012: Seminars and tech spotlight

Hi, all.

Last week we had three great ETC sponsored events take place on campus, and we recorded each of them. Below are the abstracts and results.

Tuesday February 14th – John LeMasney on promoting personal brand with Social Media.

In this session, we will discuss how companies may be searching for you and checking your posts for alignment with their organizational culture. We will discuss the different grouping methods in these social networks, and tools for managing them. We will look at privacy settings for each of these social networks, and look at conferencing tools in Facebook and Google Plus.

Wednesday, February 15,
12:00 noon

Frist Multipurpose Room B
OpenScholar at Princeton: An Academic Website Publishing Tool
Ben Johnston and Angel Brady
OpenScholar is an academic website publishing tool developed at Harvard University and built on the open source  Drupal platform.  The Educational Technologies Center, together with Web Development Services, began offering OpenScholar as a service to Princeton faculty and graduate students in August of 2011. Since that time, over 90 personal and collaborative project websites have been created. Each OpenScholar website comes with a suite of tools for publishing biographies, curriculum vitae, blog posts, publications, and more. This session will introduce the OpenScholar system, how to request a site on the system, and explore the feature of the system.  Examples of faculty profile websites, as well as project websites, will also be presented.
About the speaker:
Ben Johnston is Senior Educational Technologist at OIT’s Educational Technologies Center and manager of the Humanities Resource Center in East Pyne.  Ben has been involved with educational technology for over ten years in positions at Columbia University, Bryn Mawr College, and at Princeton University. While at Princeton, Ben has worked with educators and researchers across the Humanities and Social Sciences to facilitate the use of digital assets, technology tools, databases, and digital video in teaching and research.
Angel Brady is an Educational Technologist at the Humanities Resource Center in the Educational Technology Center. Prior to coming to Princeton, she worked as an Instructional Technologist and Training Specialist at Rider University. In 2005, she graduated with a Masters of Science in Biomedical Visualization from the University of Illinois at Chicago. She was awarded the Frank Netter Award for Special Contributions to Medical Education in 2007 for graduate research work performed at Virtual Reality in Medicine Lab (VRMedLab). She is a digital and traditional artist and likes to bake.

 

https://mediacentral.princeton.edu/id/1_h77t98y4
Thursday, February 16,
12:00 noon

Frist Multipurpose Room A
Mind-Mapping Tools for Teaching and Research
John LeMasney and Ben Johnston
Mind mapping is a visual organization method that has interconnecting nodes of data. Digital mind mapping applications make the process clean and portable, and come in both cloud based and desktop based forms. Come to this session to learn more about this visual information organizing method.
About the speaker: 

John LeMasney is responsible for Educational Technology Training and Outreach at Princeton University. He has a MA in Organizational Leadership from Rider University, and a BFA in Sculpture from the University of the Arts.
Ben Johnston is Senior Educational Technologist at OIT’s Educational Technologies Center and manager of the Humanities Resource Center in East Pyne.  Ben has been involved with educational technology for over ten years in positions at Columbia University, Bryn Mawr College, and at Princeton University. While at Princeton, Ben has worked with educators and researchers across the Humanities and Social Sciences to facilitate the use of digital assets, technology tools, databases, and digital video in teaching and research.
https://mediacentral.princeton.edu/id/1_h2vybsvf
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Tech Spotlight: GoogleDocs Discussions

A couple months ago I did a presentation at Productive Scholar about annotating digital documents. I didn’t talk much about GoogleDocs in that talk.  Although their commenting feature was perfectly nice, it seemed a bit too simple and didn’t seem to really take advantage of the medium. Well apparently also a couple months ago, Google changed their commenting feature and it is worth taking another look at.  They are now calling them ‘discussion’ rather than comments which makes perfect sense because they have added the ability to reply to comments much as you would in a discussion board or when commenting on a blog post. Each reply in a discussion has a picture of the commenter so it is clear who commented, and a timestamp so it is clear when they commented. The author of a comment can also be alerted by e-mail when someone replies to their comment. There is also a button labeled ‘Resolve’ in the discussion area. Clicking this button will hide the discussion from view.  It can later be restored from a ‘Discussions’ menu in the upper right hand corner of the screen.

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Tech Spotlights: Finding and using free images on the Web

English: Species: (Helophilus intentus ) Curra...

English: Species: (Helophilus intentus ) Curran & Fluke, 1922 Finding place: Restoule Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada -- 2008 September Français : Helophilus intentus ) Photo prise dans le parc provinçal Restoule en Ontario au Canada. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Here is the slideshow from out tech Spotlight Session on 10/21/2010.

Here’s a link to the handout (PDF): Finding and Using Free Images on the Web.pdf

Technology Spotlights: Microsoft PhotoStory

Photo Story

Photo Story (Photo credit: Mark Emery Photography)

PhotoStory is a free program by Microsoft that works with Windows XP, Vista and Windows 7. With PhotoStory you can create a slide show with you digital pictures, edit your pictures, create a story with original music and add narration. PhotoStory also allows you to add titles to each picture and select different transitions between slides.

PHOTOSTORY Instructions.pdf