Tag Archives: iphone

Lunch & Learn: iPad for Beginners with Angel Brady and Janet Temos

Lunch & Learn

Lunch & Learn

In the Lunch & Learn session on Wednesday, February 20th, 2013, Janet Temos, Director of the Educational Technologies Center at Princeton, and Angel Brady, Instructional Technologist in the Humanities Resource Center at Princeton, gave an introductory talk for new users of the iPad, Apple’s famously popular tablet.


Temos started the talk by introducing the iPad’s interface, sometimes met with culture shock by long time users of desktop computers because of the touch based interface, which has different interactions than a mouse based interface. Using two fingers versus one and gesturing, or holding down your finger for an extra second have meaning on tablet interfaces, and no easy equivalent on a mouse based interface. Temos noted that collecting many applications can make navigating that large collection more difficult, but you can create folders on your iPad to organize those apps that go together, or to make sense of the way that you work. Janet has a folder just for presentation apps. From your home screen where your apps are listed, the clean interface may make you wonder how to do such a thing as adding a folder. If you hold your finger on an app for a few seconds (a long press gesture), the apps start to ‘shake’, at which point you can move or delete them. Shaking is a visual indicator on the iPad that you can make a change to the shaking items, such as deletion or moving. To create a folder, after a long press, drop one app on to another. To add an app to a folder, after a long press, drag it into the folder. While your apps collection may span several screens that you can swipe through, the dock (the area at the bottom of the iPad screen) remains constant. To store your most often used apps for quick opening, store them on the dock. When you are all done, hit the physical home button on the iPad to exit the ‘shaky’ editing mode.

Managing app processes and settings

Do a double press on the physical home button to see what apps are in memory. You can press each icon to remove the app from active memory, which relieves the processor from having to manage that app actively. You can customize the iPad dramatically via the Settings app. Add email accounts, join networks, and change your sound settings, among many other options. Temos suggests that you explore the settings and their effects to get deeply familiar with your iPad. You can also change the setting of each app here.


The iPad’s virtual on-screen keyboard works when a Bluetooth keyboard is not present. Long presses on this keyboard’s keys often give shortcuts to alternative characters and strings. A long press on O, for instance, gives many alternative versions of the O such as various accented versions.

App store

You can manage and add to the installed apps on your iPad via the App Store. You must login to your iTunes account to buy, update and track apps, even the free ones. If you have to rebuild your iPad, you can reinstall previously purchased apps. You can visit the purchased area of the App Store app to see what you have installed in the past.

Hardware add-ons

Temos suggested that while the iPad is a self-contained, fully working object, you can get many benefits from the various add-ons that you can buy for it.

Headphones make for a more private audio experience. A bluetooth keyboard can make your iPad into a small, highly portable laptop. A stylus can make drawing and writing on the iPad far easier than with your finger. Various dongles, ranging from $30-50 allow you to send your iPad screen to VGA, HDMI and other video interfaces, for display on a projector or a TV. You can also use an Apple TV, about $100, which allows you to show the iPad on-screen via a wireless display technology Apple calls Airplay. You can also use the Apple TV to buy and watch movies from Apple, or use your Netflix, Hulu, and other media services.

Security and cloud storage

Temos briefly mentioned that by default, you need only ‘swipe to unlock’ a running iPad, which is the default, but that you can set a password as an extra layer of defense so that if you lose your iPad or if it gets stolen, the finder or thief would need to guess or crack your password to make use of your data. Brady told the audience that you can add many cloud storage services to get access to those files. In particular, she described how you can add WebSpace via the WebDAV protocol, which both WebSpace and the iPad support. (http://helpdesk.princeton.edu/kb/display.plx?id=9924)


No talk about the iPad would be complete without sharing various useful apps for the audience to consider. Both Temos and Brady suggested apps that might make sense for faculty, staff and students at Princeton. Brady and Temos presented various levels of detail on the following applications.

The Orchestra (TouchPress)

This app allows you to explore the orchestra in innovative ways, including written explanations of instruments from musicians, a follow-along version of the  score, and simultaneous shots of players and conductor during the performance. The app focuses on works by Haydn, Beethoven, Berlioz, Debussy and others. http://www.touchpress.com/blog/2012/12/our-creative-director-waxes-lyrical-about-orchestra/


If you want to watch courses on technology, business, and productivity, including a fantastic list of popular design applications like Photoshop, this app is a great place to get your fill. Because of Princeton’s site license for Lynda, Princeton faculty, staff, and students may use it for free. (http://lynda.princeton.edu)

Camera App

The iPad’s front and rear facing camera allow you to take pictures or video of yourself or what’s in front of you. You can add a grid to help you to compose your shots. Connect via USB, use email, or use Photo Stream to move the photos from the iPad to your computer or elsewhere. (http://www.apple.com/icloud/features/photo-stream.html)

Note taking apps

Angel Brady presented a set of apps specifically for taking notes in the field, including Evernote, Notability, and others. She detailed her findings in this post at http://blogs.princeton.edu/etc/2013/02/20/field-note-taking-with-the-ipad/

Lunch & Learn: David Hopkins on Kaltura at Princeton

David Hopkins, who manages the Broadcast Center at Princeton, needed a unified, centralized solution for users to upload, store, backup, edit, and share video. Kaltura is an open source video streaming service that has done those things since its launch earlier this year. The Princeton home page, Blackboard courses, social media venues, departmental sites, and other users have greatly increased the amount of video that they are sharing, and Hopkins needed a tool that would meet those increased needs. The goal was to centralize storage, backup and management of video and audio files, and make them available in a variety of formats to meet the needs of a long list of devices. Continue reading

Using Pinterest in the classroom


Image by stevegarfield via Flickr

Pinterest is quickly becoming a popular way to visually share articles and images, in great part due to its beautiful collage-like scrolling interface. Visual Bookmarking extends Social bookmarking services like http://delicious.com and http://diigo.com to continue to save and share bookmarks, but with a particular focus on the visual elements of those bookmarks. Visual bookmarking systems, such as ffffound and we heart it have been around a while, but they have not gained the amount of focus, users, nor social media following & integration that Pinterest has. For visual learners, who are drawn in more by visual stimuli than other forms of content, Pinterest could be a great way to engage. For instance, you might use the service in order to keep a series of articles in a stream for your class to review and/or begin conversations. Pinterest has gained a user base that is especially interested in technology, design, food, photography, crafts, and philosophy, and for those subjects in particular, it may be especially powerful. It has an omnipresent search engine, so that you can see what people are “pinning” regarding a particular topic recently. Each “pin” is based on an image from either an uploaded image or a URL with images or videos on it, and allows for context, metadata, and commentary. You can also follow all or some of another user’s collections, called “boards”, in order to stay aware of that user’s visual bookmarks. The service is free, and allows you to sign in using Facebook, Twitter, or native credentials.


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Mobile App and site review: Lightbox

English: A collage of an image modified with 1...

Image via Wikipedia

Lightbox is a free Android application that ties tightly into a photography social media site at http://lightbox.com

It is described as:

“a place to capture, enhance, & share your moments. Your photos are automatically organized into a timeline of postcards on Lightbox.com. Keep them private or selectively share them with friends, family, or the entire Lightbox community.” (source)

You can go to lightbox.com and sign up for a free account, after which you can save the photographers and designers who you want to follow, as well as upload photos from your desktop. After installing the free app from Android Market, you can use your Android based phone to upload photos directly to Lightbox and share them on other social networks like Facebook and Twitter in a few clicks.

One notable thing about this application is that it offers many of the features that iPhone users enjoy with the currently iOS-only Instagram app, including simple effects, cropping, and virtually instantaneous uploads. It could certainly be used to track the image-based objects that students come across for a visual class project, or used to simply collect the interesting visual items that a faculty member might come across in their research.

The Productive Scholar: Lecture Capture on the Fly presented by Angel Brady

Thursday, October 6,
12:00 noon

***Oakes Lounge, Whig Hall***
Lecture Capture on the Fly:
Lecture Capture Apps

Angel Brady

Many great points and conversations come up during a lecture that faculty and students would like to revisit. You can easily record your lecture audio with a device such as the iPad using apps that are readily available for download with little equipment setup required . We will explore the different apps available for the iPad (and other mobile devices) and their features.
About the speaker:

Angel Brady is an Educational Technologist at the Humanities Resource Center at Princeton University. Prior to coming to Princeton, she was an Instructional Technologist and Training Specialist at Rider University. She earned her Master’s of Science in Biomedical Visualization from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Link to presentation: https://docs.google.com/present/view?id=dmx9k2p_403gc2f8gg


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