Tag Archives: mobile

The Productive Scholar: Writing on the Walls: annotation tools for digital projection and collaboration

Topic: Writing on the Walls: annotation tools for digital projection and collaboration
Speaker: Janet Temos

Time: Thursday, October 24, 12noon – 1pm
Location: HRC Classroom, Room 012, Lower Level, East Pyne

Do you find yourself going back and forth between the classroom whiteboard/blackboard and your PowerPoint to write notes or diagram a problem? Can you and your students see that board adequately in the darkened room? When you lower the projection screen to show your class presentation, does it obscure the only place to write? Did you ever wish you had a blank page mid-lecture so you could diagram or sketch an idea that’s just occurred to you? At the end of your talk, does everyone whip out their cell phones to take a picture of the notes you’ve written on the board?

Interactive whiteboards can help combine digital presentations and manual annotations on a single screen by using digital ink for freehand notes and annotations. The annotations can then typically be saved and shared with an audience, or circulated for collaborative work. This talk will provide an overview of various hardware, software, and mobile solutions to make on-screen annotations spontaneous and easy.

Janet Temos is the Director of the Educational Technologies Center at Princeton. She is a member of the Princeton class of 1982, and received her PhD at Princeton in 2001. The ETC helps faculty use technology in teaching and research, and includes Training and Outreach as well as the New Media Center (NMC). We also offer consulting, training and outreach in educational technologies.

Productive Scholar: Tablets for the Classroom: iPad, MS Surface, and Android 9/26, 12noon

Topic: Tablets for the Classroom: iPad, MS Surface, and Android
Speaker: Janet Temos, ETC Director, Princeton University

Time: Thursday, September 26, 12:00pm – 1:00pm
Location: HRC Classroom, Room 012, Lower Level, East Pyne

Apple iPad, Amazon Kindle Fire HD, and the Microsoft Surface: Tablets in the Classroom. What makes the difference between a mobile device for personal consumption, and a mobile device that is effective as a teaching and research tool? Find out at this week’s Productive Scholar, where the three major tablet brands listed above will be examined.

Topics covered will include: What to consider when buying a tablet; how to transfer and work with documents created on your desktop using a tablet; how to display from a tablet to a classroom projector; how to use a tablet effectively for text creation; and finally, how not to mess up the “fun” leisure-time tablet features while also making your device a companion to professional life.

About the Speaker:
Janet Temos
is the Director of the Educational Technologies Center at Princeton. She is a member of the Princeton class of 1982, and received her PhD at Princeton in 2001. The ETC helps faculty use technology in teaching and research, and includes Training and Outreach as well as the New Media Center (NMC). We also offer consulting, training and outreach in educational technologies.

To subscribe to the ETC announcement listserv, email: mrdaniel@princeton.edu

BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) and the Classroom

A new technology trend has been making the rounds in education. The technology trend is called BYOD or Bring Your Own Device. In higher education, this idea is not really that new. It has become second nature for a student to bring a laptop and their mobile device to a class. But with the increase access to more mobile devices (such as tablets, smartphones, eReaders, and laptops), an instructor might wonder, how can I engage my student in class while their use their own devices (or should I)?

Some see the BYOD trend as a negative trend. Having devices floating around during a lecture may cause a student not to focus on the content of the lecture. Others have taken that point of view and flipped it, and asked, how can I get the student to become engaged with my content by using their own device? We have blogged about using software to set up polling questions and that students can answer using their laptops and mobile devices. That is one way BYOD could work in the classroom. Continue reading

Lunch & Learn: Serge Goldstein on the iPrinceton app.

Over the past two years, OIT, in collaboration with a number of University departments and Blackboard Inc., has developed a mobile application suite named “iPrinceton.” This suite is currently available for iPhone/iPads, Android, and Blackberry mobile devices, as well as other mobile devices that have a web browser. In this talk I will review iPrinceton and its development, focusing on the challenges involved in developing the application, and the impact that mobile app development is having on IT at Princeton and beyond.  If you have a mobile device, be sure to download iPrinceton before you come (it is free).

Speaker bio:
As Academic Services’ first Director, Serge Goldstein is proud to head up a team that includes people with a wide range of skills, all dedicated to supporting use of technology in the academic enterprise. He started his professional career as an academic. He received a B.A., M.Phil. and Ph.D. degree, all from Yale University, all in Anthropology. His field work and dissertation were on the ecology of Rhesus monkeys in Northwestern Pakistan. In the course of analyzing his data, he began to use computers, became enamored, and never looked back. He has at various times been a systems programmer (specializing in IBM mainframe operating systems, and later in Unix and NextStep), an instructor of computer internals, a web page designer, and an occasional college lecturer (in quantitative methods). He still thinks of himself primarily as an academic, and his role at Princeton as being primarily to ensure that OIT is providing services that address the needs of academics.

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Google App Inventor

android_logo.pngThe Google App Inventor is a new tool that Google has launched. It is aimed at helping non-coders to develop Android apps (for Android phones) with a series of building "blocks" for mobile phones. This is a great tool for instructors that would like to add a mobile component to their course work. This is also a great tool for students to use to show their work and share their research on a broader scale (in the Android Marketplace).  If you would like to create your own Android app (and have a Google account), check out the Google App Inventor with the link below:

http://appinventor.googlelabs.com/