Tag Archives: News from OIT

Lunch & Learn: Gold Award for Outreach Efforts

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The integrated outreach effort centered on the Lunch ‘n Learn Information Technology seminars has just received a gold medal for Best Practices in Communications in the 2009 CASE II Accolades Awards. CASE, the Council for Support and Advancement of Education, makes annual awards to educational institutions in 40 different categories, including alumni relations, communications, design, development, grant writing, magazines, marketing, news writing, photography, portals, publications, and Web.
For more than 15 years, Princeton University’s Office of Information Technology has sponsored the lunch time series featuring speakers with varied affiliations exploring a wide array of cutting edge technology topics. During the past four years, Academic ServicesEducation and Outreach Services have sought to transform the existing series into fully integrated outreach, with these blog posts, high quality podcasts, RSS feeds, and through Facebook, demonstrating how a small outreach office with sophisticated collaboration tools can leverage its resources.

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OnTour @ The Peter B. Lewis Library: The Broadcast and New Media Centers

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In addition to the Science Library, the new Peter B Lewis Library will contain a new OIT-operated Broadcast Center. The center’s HD video studio will assist University professors to be interviewed live on major television and radio networks. The center’s professional audio recording studio contains sound proof walls that will block common campus noises that have, in the past, spoiled many campus interviews. The facilities will support the recording of major campus events such as Public Lectures, Opening Exercises, and Commencement. The studio will also manage the recording of lectures, podcasts, and rich media content.
Newly opened, the facility includes a digital audio suite, a full sized studio with blue- and green screen capabilities, a green room with a 65 inch LCD screen, and a high definition control room.

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Lunch & Learn: “Is Your Computer Secure?” with Anthony Scaturro

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You’ve just gotten a new computer. You connect it to your high-speed Internet connection and within seconds … the computer has been attacked thousands of times.
Most of the attacks will fail but a few may succeed. The result of the attacks may be undetectable and could be intentionally delayed. After all, you have little data on the system yet.
Many computer users assume that their new computers will protect important information “out-of-the-box.” While such products often contain security mechanisms, we must individually stay informed about security precautions and make a concerted effort to keep our systems safe.

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Blackboard at Princeton

Blackboard_Logo-wht.gifKen King of CUNY was the first to joke that it took three decades for the overhead projector to find its way from the bowling alley to the classroom. His point, true until recently, was that classrooms have been technological backwaters, defined more by chalk and slate than by silicon.
In August 2000, the Provost decreed that every Princeton course should have it own web site. Until then, faculty habitually distributed their syllabi and course information on the first day of the class. Students had to travel to the reserve reading room to obtain most of their course readings.
Today, all courses at Princeton rely upon the BlackBoard CMS (Course Management system). For the students, the change is a welcome relief. Apart from the fact that they can’t now misplace their copy of the syllabus, Blackboard is a central repository for and integral component of every course. Students can read their course materials online, take part in online discussions, download a fresh syllabus, submit their work, and even take a quiz.

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Lunch & Learn: Collaboration Tools at Princeton with Mark Ratliff

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OIT’s recent Strategic Planning effort identified the need for a “data lifeline,” a comprehensive way to store digital information, ways to search and archive the data, and policies to control data retention and disposal. OIT has begun the construction of an “information infrastructure” that will include massive central data storage, comprehensive data repositories, and simple-to-use collaboration software.
To help oversee these efforts, OIT has hired Mark Ratliff, one of the original developers of JSTOR, a popular online scholarly journal archive, as our new “digital repository architect.” And OIT has acquired and installed several products that aim to simplify the management of digital content for all members of the University community.

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