Tag Archives: Princeton University

Lunch and Learn: How to make your own web based survey with Qualtrics at Princeton

Princeton has a sophisticated survey creation and reporting tool, and if you are part of the PU community, it could be just the tool for your next survey.

On Wednesday, March 7th, 2012, Edward Freeland and Naila Rahman talked about Qualtrics, an online survey management solution used by the Princeton University Survey Research Center. The video of the session is below. The University’s Survey Research Center needed a survey solution that was web based, online, simple to use and learn easily, sophisticated enough to do experiments, secure, and respectful of survey participants personal information. They chose Qualtrics, and have used it since July of 2010. Since that time, they have amassed 300 survey creators, 1500 surveys, and 230,000 interviews.

Rahman explained that creating a survey with Qualtrics is as easy as clicking a button and creating or copying existing questions. Survey creators can build their own surveys, copy existing surveys, or browse and select from a few survey libraries in Qualtrics. With proper formatting, you can even import your survey using an uploaded Word document. Many question types exist for surveys in the system, including multiple choice, dropdown list, single answer, multiple answer, graphics based questions, ranking style questions in which you drag and drop to rank items, and sliders & matrices for likert styled survey questions. The editor for surveys has a clean and useful wysiwyg editor, where you can add page breaks, bold or italicize text, make specific color choices, custom headers, and more.

Rahman spent some time explaining the system’s skip and display logic, where you can set rules based on survey responses to display differing content or custom survey destinations. You can also pipe text, meaning you can use a previous question response to modify an upcoming question in a survey. For instance, if you ask a respondent what their favorite color is, and they say red, you can have Qualtrics ask how much the respondent likes red specifically with a scale based question.

Survey creators can add from pre-existing question libraries such as the Princeton survey question library in the system, which holds question pools on topics like demographics. Qualtrics libraries store your messages that are sent to your samples, graphics used in your surveys, questions and other items, so that they can be re-used repeatedly. Your results are stored online, and are graphed to give you a visual representation of your data. You can export your data to Excel, and you can even schedule an emailed report of updated data and survey results. The Survey Flow features allows you to randomize or re-order either portions or the entirety of the survey. Distribution can be done via email or direct link — The Panels feature allows you to upload a CSV file with first name, last name, and email for a sample. You can manage and schedule the announcement to your survey sample directly through Qualtrics.

Rahman went into some deeper detail about the sophisticated use of Survey Flow, question types, display logic, and skip logic in Princeton’s 2010 internal survey on Family Benefits, which gave the audience a sense of the power that Qualtrics has in delivering high-quality surveys.

If you are a part of the University community, please visit http://www.princeton.edu/~psrc to get started with Qualtrics.

To get overviews and tutorials on how to use Qualtrics in 5 steps, please visit: http://www.qualtrics.com/university/researchsuite/learn-qualtrics-in-5-steps

About Princeton’s Survey Research Center:
Our Mission: The SRC’s main purpose is to assist students and faculty in designing and implementing their own survey research projects. The SRC provides consultation and guidance on study design, sampling, instrument development, data collection and data processing. The Center has a 12-station computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI) facility, a library collection on survey research methods, and a network of external resources.

About Us: The Princeton University Survey Research Center (SRC) was founded in 1992 with a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The SRC is a resource for Princeton University students, faculty, and administration. The SRC has three principal activities: consultation, education and project management.

The Productive Scholar: Angel Brady on Augmented Reality in Education

video platform video management video solutions video player

Thursday, February 23, 12:00 noon
Frist Multipurpose Room A
Augmented Reality (AR) in Education
Angel Brady
Click on the following link to view the presentation slides, with links. https://docs.google.com/present/view?id=djrsswm_18zmhtgh48

Angel also added “I found this link on how to export objects out of Second Life and edit them in a 3D modeling program: http://exporttoworld.plugimi.com/index.php?/how-to-export/

Augmented Reality (AR) has been around for some time and also has been labeled as a “gimmicky” technology. With a couple of new applications using AR, it is now being revisited again in the educational world. What exactly is AR? According to Wikipedia Augmented Reality is “a live, direct or indirect, view of a physical, real-world environment whose elements are augmented by computer-generated sensory input such as sound, video, graphics or GPS data.” Imagine a mobile app that displays real time digital meta data over real world physical objects and is viewed through the camera on your mobile device. That is a form of AR.
How is AR being used in education? How do you get started with using AR in your courses? What mobile applications and computer programs are available that use this technology? All if these questions will be discussed during this session.
About the speaker:
Angel Brady is an Educational Technologist at the Humanities Resource Center at Princeton University. Prior to coming to Princeton, she was an Instructional Technologist and Training Specialist at Rider University. She earned her Master’s of Science in Biomedical Visualization from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

ETC offerings for the week of February 12, 2012: Seminars and tech spotlight

Hi, all.

Last week we had three great ETC sponsored events take place on campus, and we recorded each of them. Below are the abstracts and results.

Tuesday February 14th – John LeMasney on promoting personal brand with Social Media.

In this session, we will discuss how companies may be searching for you and checking your posts for alignment with their organizational culture. We will discuss the different grouping methods in these social networks, and tools for managing them. We will look at privacy settings for each of these social networks, and look at conferencing tools in Facebook and Google Plus.

Wednesday, February 15,
12:00 noon

Frist Multipurpose Room B
OpenScholar at Princeton: An Academic Website Publishing Tool
Ben Johnston and Angel Brady
OpenScholar is an academic website publishing tool developed at Harvard University and built on the open source  Drupal platform.  The Educational Technologies Center, together with Web Development Services, began offering OpenScholar as a service to Princeton faculty and graduate students in August of 2011. Since that time, over 90 personal and collaborative project websites have been created. Each OpenScholar website comes with a suite of tools for publishing biographies, curriculum vitae, blog posts, publications, and more. This session will introduce the OpenScholar system, how to request a site on the system, and explore the feature of the system.  Examples of faculty profile websites, as well as project websites, will also be presented.
About the speaker:
Ben Johnston is Senior Educational Technologist at OIT’s Educational Technologies Center and manager of the Humanities Resource Center in East Pyne.  Ben has been involved with educational technology for over ten years in positions at Columbia University, Bryn Mawr College, and at Princeton University. While at Princeton, Ben has worked with educators and researchers across the Humanities and Social Sciences to facilitate the use of digital assets, technology tools, databases, and digital video in teaching and research.
Angel Brady is an Educational Technologist at the Humanities Resource Center in the Educational Technology Center. Prior to coming to Princeton, she worked as an Instructional Technologist and Training Specialist at Rider University. In 2005, she graduated with a Masters of Science in Biomedical Visualization from the University of Illinois at Chicago. She was awarded the Frank Netter Award for Special Contributions to Medical Education in 2007 for graduate research work performed at Virtual Reality in Medicine Lab (VRMedLab). She is a digital and traditional artist and likes to bake.

 

https://mediacentral.princeton.edu/id/1_h77t98y4
Thursday, February 16,
12:00 noon

Frist Multipurpose Room A
Mind-Mapping Tools for Teaching and Research
John LeMasney and Ben Johnston
Mind mapping is a visual organization method that has interconnecting nodes of data. Digital mind mapping applications make the process clean and portable, and come in both cloud based and desktop based forms. Come to this session to learn more about this visual information organizing method.
About the speaker: 

John LeMasney is responsible for Educational Technology Training and Outreach at Princeton University. He has a MA in Organizational Leadership from Rider University, and a BFA in Sculpture from the University of the Arts.
Ben Johnston is Senior Educational Technologist at OIT’s Educational Technologies Center and manager of the Humanities Resource Center in East Pyne.  Ben has been involved with educational technology for over ten years in positions at Columbia University, Bryn Mawr College, and at Princeton University. While at Princeton, Ben has worked with educators and researchers across the Humanities and Social Sciences to facilitate the use of digital assets, technology tools, databases, and digital video in teaching and research.
https://mediacentral.princeton.edu/id/1_h2vybsvf
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The Productive Scholar: Roku Box: Making Your Own Television Lineup, presented by John LeMasney

In this session, John LeMasney will show you how you can use Roku’s set top box to stream movies, shows, and audio to your television, cultivating, curating, and crafting your very own lineup of rich content that suits your own tastes. Come to the session to learn how you can cut your cable cord and start enjoying TV your own way.

Speaker bio:

John LeMasney is a father, artist, designer, consultant, technologist, open web advocate and open source evangelist living and working in New Jersey.
He is the Manager of Educational Technology Training and Outreach at Princeton University, responsible for training and presenting to faculty and students about the effective use of technology for communication, work, teaching and learning. He tries to help people get things done.
John received his Bachelor of Fine Arts with honors from the  University of the Arts in Philadelphia, PA in 1998.
He received his Master of Arts in Organizational Leadership (communication) with honors from Rider University in Lawrenceville, NJ in 2009.

Lunch and Learn: Impact Factors: What They Mean, What They Don’t Mean, and Why You Should Care, presented by Elana Broch

Note that only audio was recorded for this session, but the PDF of the presentation is available here for you to follow along: Elana Broch: Impact Factors

You may have noticed journals’ announcements of their “impact factor” on their home page.  “We’re number 1” sounds good, but what does it really mean?  I’ll begin with a quick overview of Web of Science, the database that forms the basic for the calculations of the impact factor, show how impact factor is calculated, and the factors that influence its interpretability.  Finally, we’ll discuss alternatives to the impact factor.

Speaker bio:

Elana Broch is the assistant population research librarian in Stokes Library here at Princeton.  Before coming to Princeton, she worked as a measurement statistician on the GRE at Educational Testing Service. She earned a PhD in Psychometric Methods from the University of Minnesota before earning her Master’s degree in Library and Information Science.  Her dissertation “An investigation of the effect of item complexity and dimension strength on item parameter recovery in multidimensional datasets,” has one (incomplete citation) in Web of Science.”