Tag Archives: professional development

The Productive Scholar: OpenScholar: Personal Websites for Scholars

Topic: OpenScholar: Personal Websites for ScholarsOpenScholar-Logo
Speakers: Angel Brady, Ben Johnston

Time: Thursday, October 9, 12:00pm – 1:00pm
Location: New Media Center (NMC), 130 Lewis Library, First Floor

Slides from this session are available here:

OpenScholar is a website building and content management tool available to faculty and graduate students for hosting professional profile sites. OpenScholar sites can contain biographies, CVs, course lists, publications, blog entries, and event listings. An owner of a site does not need to know code or web development tools to edit and use the site. A user only needs to a web browser to edit the site. OpenScholar is hosted by Web Development Services in Princeton’s Office of Information Technology.

To check out OpenScholar, and set up your account prior to the workshop, visit Princeton’s OpenScholar webpage.

Speakers
Angel Brady is an Academic Systems Support and Training Specialist in Academic Technology Services in OIT. She provides support for Princeton’s Blackboard service, OpenScholar, and Princeton’s WordPress blogs. Previously, she was an Educational Technologist at the Humanities Resource Center at Princeton University. Prior to coming to Princeton, she was an Instructional Technologist and Training Specialist at Rider University. She earned her Master’s of Science in Biomedical Visualization from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Ben Johnston is currently Humanities Computing Specialist at Princeton University’s Center for Digital Humanities.  Ben has over fifteen years’ experience working with faculty to integrate technology into teaching, learning, and research at Princeton University’s Educational Technology Center in the Office of Information Technology, Bryn Mawr College, and Columbia University’s Columbia Center for New Media Teaching and Learning. Ben holds a Masters degree in Instructional Technology and Media from Teachers College, Columbia University.

The Productive Scholar: Harnessing the Power of PowerPoint: Creating Effective Presentations for Students, Professionals, and the General Public

Topic: Harnessing the Power of PowerPoint: Creating Effective Presentations for Students, Professionals, and the General Public
Speaker: Robbie Davis-Floyd, Ph.D., Senior Research Fellow, University of Texas at Austin

Time: Thursday, November 12, 3:30PM – 5:00PM
Location: 330 Frist, McGraw Center Classroom, Third Floor Frist Campus Center

RSVP REQUIRED: EVENT NOW CLOSED DUE TO LIMITED SEATING.

There is a certain art to creating an effective PowerPoint presentation, whether it is for students, professionals, or the general public. Too many bells and whistles can be distracting, too few can make the talk boring. How much information should you put on a given slide? How can you keep your audience engaged even through the necessary technicalities? Should you just read your slides, or use them as mnemonics to jog your memory? Over the past twenty years, Dr. Robbie Davis-Floyd has given hundreds of talks around the world and has plenty of tricks to share on the judicious and artful use of PowerPoint, and on the art of public speaking in general!

Speaker bio:
From Robbie Davis Floyd‘s website: “As a cultural anthropologist, I have spent over 20 years researching issues in the anthropology of reproduction, focusing most closely on childbirth, obstetrics, and midwifery, which I continue to study and write about. I have also found opportunities to branch out into other areas that fascinate me: ritual and gender studies, corporate futures planning, biomedicine, integrative medicine, science and technology studies. This for me is part of the magic of anthropology: it gives you a set of tools for studying any arena of life that captures your interest.”

The Productive Scholar: Introduction to OpenScholar@Princeton

Topic: Introduction to OpenScholar @ Princeton
Speaker: Angel Brady, Educational Technologist, Humanities Resource Center, OIT

Angel Brady, Educational Technologist at the Humanities Resource Center, OIT, provided us with a guided tour of OpenScholar@Princeton, providing some background on the service and highlighting a number its capabilities.

Once upon a time, let’s say 2009, in a land not too far away, let’s call it Cambridge (Massachusetts, not England), members of Harvard University’s Institute of Quantitative Social Science created a service upon which they bestowed the name OpenScholar with the idea of changing how personal academic websites “are created, used, and managed.” According to its developers, the design of OpenScholar reflects the assumption “that scholars need modern, highly dynamic, full-featured websites, which can be created easily and managed with absolutely no technical skills, or special software.” (Scholars Web Sites Project Overview, 2010). For many of the scholars at the eleven institutions that have adopted it to date, it offers an accessible solution to the challenges of creating a professional online presence. For those seeking an relatively easy interface that affords a dynamic reflection of varied career, academic service, and individual and collaborative research pursuits, Open Scholar may be the answer. Continue reading

The Productive Scholar: Introduction to OpenScholar, 10/3, 12noon

Topic: Introduction to OpenScholar
Speaker: Angel Brady

Time: Thursday, October 3, 12noon – 1:00pm
Location: HRC Classroom, Room 012, Lower Level, East Pyne

OpenScholar is a website building and content management tool for professionals in academia. OpenScholar lets you easily create and manage a highly dynamic, powerful, and customizable site, with an easy-to-use interface and a look-and-feel that is uniquely yours. The creation tools in OpenScholar are designed to be easy to use by those with all levels of technical expertise. Attendees are encouraged to request an account 24 hrs in advance of the session at http://scholar.princeton.edu so they can follow along with the presentation.

About the Speaker:
Angel Brady
is an Educational Technologist at the Humanities Resource Center (HRC) at Princeton University. Prior to coming to Princeton, she was an Instructional Technologist and Training Specialist at Rider University. She earned her Master’s of Science in Biomedical Visualization from the University of Illinois at Chicago.