Tag Archives: University of Washington

Lunch and Learn: SearchIt@PUL with Nancy Pressman-Levy and Jeremy Darrington

Wednesday, February 29,
12:00 noon

Frist Multipurpose Room B
SearchIt@PUL:  New Research Discovery Tool from the Library
Nancy Pressman-Levy, Jeremy Darrington
Would you like to learn how to expand your research beyond Google?   SearchIt@PUL, the Library’s new discovery system introduced in the fall of 2011, is just the tool you need to help you discover the impressive resources the Princeton University Library makes available.  SearchIt@PUL consists of two research options:
Catalog+ is a new interface to the Library’s Main Catalog, which allows you to limit a search by “post-search” facets, renew items online, manage saved titles, and place various requests.  
Articles+ is a large search engine that links to full-text journal and newspaper articles, as well as to other electronic content from the Library’s online subscriptions.  Other content includes dissertations, book reviews, conference proceedings, art and photo images, and audio recordings.
Join Princeton librarians Jeremy Darrington and Nancy Pressman Levy for a  demo of this exciting new system.
About the speakers:
Jeremy Darrington is Princeton’s Politics Librarian and a member of the Library’s Discovery Implementation team. Jeremy works extensively with students and faculty to help them find data and sources for their research. His interests include the use of technology in research and instruction, changes in the scholarly communication system, access to government information, preservation of research data, and digital privacy. He is ABD in political science from UC Berkeley and has a Masters in Library and Information Science from the University of Washington.
Nancy Pressman Levy is the Head of the Donald E. Stokes Library and a member of the Library’s Discovery Implementation team.
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Lunch & Learn: Creative Commons: Guilt-Free Reuse of Others’ Work with Keith Gresham and David Hollander

Modern copyright law guarantees authors full rights over their work even without the inclusion of the © copyright notice. “All rights reserved” gives authors (for the length of their lives plus 70 years) the sole right to copy their works, to prepare derivatives or revisions of their works, to distribute or publish, or to perform or display their works in public.
Such unrestricted rights can create problems and generate fair-use confusion for members of the academic community who want to incorporate photographs, illustrations, music, video, and other forms of creative content into their own publications, lectures, presentations, and projects. Fair use may not infringe on copyright, and the factors used to determine what is and is not fair use include the purpose and character of the use, the nature of the copyrighted work, the amount of the work used, and the effect of such use upon the value of the copyrighted work.

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