DataCite & Data Citation Index (Thomson Reuters)

 Thomson Reuters and DataCite collaborate to expand discovery of research data -29 Aug 2014

The Intellectual Property & Science business of Thomson Reuters has announced a collaboration with DataCite, a global non-profit organization dedicated to enabling people to find, share, use, and cite data. The collaboration will promote the discovery of research data sets through the Data Citation Index, a single-point solution providing access to quality research data sets from multi-disciplinary repositories around the world.

This collaboration will connect the Data Citation Index to high quality research data from repositories worldwide that work with DataCite. This will ensure that the valuable content that has been made citable by DataCite is globally discoverable, properly attributed and reusable by other researchers. As part of the Web of Science – the premier scientific search and discovery platform and industry authority in science, social science, and arts & humanities citation indexes – inclusion within the Data Citation Index will also further DataCite’s mission of increasing acceptance of research data as citable contributions to the scholarly record.

Since creating the Data Citation Index, Thomson Reuters has worked closely with global industry leaders to expand the breadth of research discovery by capturing bibliographic records and cited references for digital research, as well as literature describing research which cites or uses the data, stewarding the accurate identification, attribution and measurement of this growing body of scholarship. The Data Citation Index allows users to gain a comprehensive view of the genesis of research projects and influence the future paths they may take, while minimizing the duplication of work and speeding the scientific research process to keep pace with the changing global research landscape. Through linked content and summary information, this data is displayed within the broader context of the scholarly research ecosystem, enabling users to gain perspective that otherwise would be lost if viewed in isolation.”

Source:  Knowledgespeak Newsletter

ChemSpider (Royal Society of Chemistry)

ChemSpider

  • http://www.chemspider.com/

    “This astonishingly powerful, award-winning database from The Royal Society of Chemistry provides fast access to over 30 million chemical structures and properties, as well as nearly unlimited links and related information. For a quick introduction, go to the About page and watch the ten-minute introductory video. Then start searching! Simple searches expedite your exploration when you enter the trade name, synonym, or systematic name of the compound you wish to find. Conversely, you can input by Structure, with an innovative Edit Molecule function. Lastly, Advanced searches allow you to combine methods. In addition, the ChemSpider blog boasts frequent entries about the site and the field at large. [CNH]

  • Source: The Scout Report — Volume 20, Number 33, from the Univ. of Wisconsin

Knovel updates Yaws’ Critical Properties and Crude Oil Assays

From today’s Knowledgespeak Newsletter (of the STM publishing industry):
Knovel expands Crude Oil Assay Database and boosts Chemical Data Records
Two of Knovel’s Critical Content Databases have received significant updates. Yaws’ Critical Property Database for Chemical Engineers and Chemists has increased by 160,000 data records to include almost 450,000 records in total. With this update, Knovel offers the largest compilation of correlations for chemical engineers online. In addition, the Crude Oil Assay Database has expanded to feature over 400 assays.
More

Princeton has a subscription to Knovel.  The Knovel database is constituted mainly of engineering resources…some manipulable.

 

 

International Year of Crystallography – 2014, IYCr 2014

International Year of Crystallography (IYCr 2014)

  • Author: ChemistryViews.org
  • Published: 01 January 2014
  • Copyright: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany

thumbnail image: International Year of Crystallography (IYCr 2014)

The International Year of Crystallography 2014 (IYCr 2014) highlights the continuing importance of crystallography.
It celebrates the centennial of X-ray diffraction. William Henry and William Lawrence Bragg showed that diffracted X-rays can be used to map the positions of atoms within a crystal. This allowed the detailed study of crystalline material.

Additionally, it commemorates the 400th anniversary of Kepler’s first studies which lead in 1611 to the observation of the symmetrical form of ice crystals. This was the beginning of the wider study of the role of symmetry in matter.


Article Views: 152

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From Wendy Warr, PhD, CHMINF-L, Jan. 2, 2014

Science Matters, newsletter published by the EPA

Science Matters

http://epa.gov/research/sciencematters/

“The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) publishes the “Science Matters” newsletter to inform the general public about its research and advocacy activities on behalf of the American public. The newsletter was first published in 2010, and is a terrific source of information on everything from green chemistry to renewable energy. In the About this Issue area, visitors can learn about the topical focus of each issue. In the Science Features, visitors can read articles such as “Nanomaterials: Harnessing the Potential, Understanding the Risks” and “Partnerships for a Safer Chemical Future.” Users shouldn’t miss the Ask a Scientist feature, which profiles a different EPA scientist in each issue. The In the News area brings together updates about new partnerships with colleges, universities, and international collaborators. [KMG]

Source:  The Scout Report (Univ. of Wisconsin)  — May 3, 2013

Journal of Molecular and Engineering Materials

Free access is offered through 31 December, 2013.  One must register though:

http://www.worldscientific.com/jmem

“Targets” reviews, communications and regular papers.  Intersects the fields of materials and molecular science.  Wants high-impact works in: materials design, synthesis, growth, analysis, characterization, properties and functions, fabrication and device manufacturing, and system integration and applications of materials.

NTRL — an expanded version of NTIS Government Reports Index

Besides NTIS, available via Engineering Village/Elsevier, Princeton University now has access to NTRL (National Technical Reports Library) (1800+) from the U.S. Government.

It provides indexing and access to a collection of more than 2,000,000 historical and current unclassified government technical reports archived by the National Technical Information Service.  Over 500,000 documents are available in full-text from departments such as Department of Energy, NASA, and the Environmental Protection Agency.

NTRS differs from NTIS in that it covers more years, mainly from 1960, but as far back as 1800.  The database is updated daily and there is full text for about 25% of the reports. 

Source:  P.U.’s Engineering Library and  Database Management Group

Chemical Abstracts Service Registry to hit 50 million substances soon

US CAS REGISTRY on track to register 50 millionth chemical substance - 18 Aug 2009

"Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS), a division of the American Chemical Society, has announced that it is on track to register the 50 millionth unique chemical substance on September 7. The CAS REGISTRY claims to be the most comprehensive and high-quality compendium of publicly disclosed chemical information. This milestone comes only 9 months after CAS registered its 40 millionth substance.

REGISTRY is the only integrated comprehensive source of chemical information from a full range of patent and journal literature that is curated and quality controlled by scientists working around the world. For more than 100 years, CAS scientists and colleagues in several nations have meticulously analysed and indexed publicly disclosed global scientific information to build up the unique REGISTRY resource that provides not only chemical names, the unique CAS Registry Number, and vital literature references but also ancillary information such as experimental and predicted property data (boiling and melting points, etc.), commercial availability, preparation details, spectra, and regulatory information from international sources.

CAS scientists follow rigorous criteria that maintain high quality and reliability of information in its REGISTRY. Scientists identify reputable sources and use consistent analysis before registering a substance. REGISTRY is available to scientists through CAS’ product, SciFinder, and its STN family of products. With these advanced search and analysis technologies, CAS helps scientists find reliable information that is vital to their research process."
 

Source: Knowledgespeak Newsletter, 8/18/09

International Chemical Identifier (InChI)

InChIs, are machine-readable, alpha-numeric character strings first developed by International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC),  Now the InChI Trust is carrying on the work to develop and expand the algorithms for open source accessibility of even more chemical structures.

From Today’s Knowledgespeak Newsletter:

"The InChI algorithm turns chemical structures into machine-readable strings of information. InChIs are unique to the compound they describe and can encode absolute stereochemistry. A simple analogy is that InChI is the bar-code for chemistry and chemical structures. The InChI format and algorithm are non-proprietary and the software is open source, with ongoing development done by the community."

"Since its launch in 2005, widespread take-up of InChI standards by public databases and journals has been observed. Today, there are more than 100 million InChIs in scientific literature and products. Numerous databases, journals and chemical structure drawing programs have incorporated the InChI algorithm. These include the NIST WebBook and mass spectral databases, the NIH/NCBI PubChem database, the NIH/NCI database, the EBI chemistry database, ChemSpider and Symyx Draw."

Nature Chemistry — new online journal from Nature Publishing Group

Nature Chemistry — the second issue is now online, and covers a wide range of topics, including catalysis, mesoporous materials, synthetic methodology, anion transport, and DNA conductivity. In addition, there is a commentary about pre-university chemical education, a review article on Mobius aromaticity and a thesis article that looks at alternative forms of the periodic table.

[Princeton University Library has subscribed, but for a time, it's free to all.]

Source: an email announcement from Nature Publishing Group