Scopus has added 5 million pre-1996 articles and over 93 million references

“Scopus has added 5 million pre-1996 articles and over 93 million references – and we’re not even half-way

on Thu, 11/26/2015 – 16:06

As of this week, Scopus has added 5 million pre-1996 records including over 93 million references to the database. This has been done in two ways: by adding pre-1996 cited references to existing articles in Scopus and by adding article back files, including their cited references, coming from archives from various publishers, going back to 1970.

This milestone is the result of the ongoing Scopus Cited Reference Expansion Program initiated in March 2014 that aims to include cited references in Scopus going back to 1970 for pre-1996 content. The goal of this expansion program is to further enhance the ability for Scopus users to perform long-term, extensive bibliometric and historic trend analyses – and to enhance and further complete the h-index for researchers who published pre-1996.

Archives already completed include the following publishers: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). American Physical Society (APS), Karger Publishers, Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC), Springer, American Medical Association (AMA), Inderscience and Elsevier.

Additional archives currently in process include: Wiley Blackwell, BioMedCentral (BMC), Taylor & Francis, Oxford University Press, Society of Automotive Engineers International, (SAE), Walter de Gruyter, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), Institute of Physics (IoP), Brill Publishers, Sage, Emerald Group Publishing, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and the American Geophysical Union (AGU).

We will keep you updated on the progress of this Expansion Program, and make sure to follow this blog or our Twitter account to stay up to date.”

Release Date:
November 26 2015

Elsevier’s ScienceDirect dropping access via Internet Explorer 8

Effective January 1, 2016, ScienceDirect will no longer support Internet Explorer 8 (IE8).

“We strongly encourage our customers to follow Microsoft’s directive as well by updating to more recent versions of IE. Additionally, users can move to the latest versions of the Chrome or Firefox browsers for an optimal ScienceDirect experience”

The whys:

  • Remove current IE8 security issues
  • Enhance existing security measures across all browsers
  • Add support for new browser technologies
  • Add responsive design to aid use of ScienceDirect across devices
  • Improve accessibility to better enable access to people with diverse abilities

 

  • If you have any questions or concerns, please visit the ScienceDirect Blog Source:  Email today from Elsevier ScienceDirect <sciencedirect@mail.elsevier.com>

The Cambridge Structural Database has reached no. 800,000

“The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre is delighted to announce that there are now over 800,000 entries in the Cambridge Structural Database. The 800,000th entry is a copper-containing metal-organic crystal structure determined by researchers in Spain and published in Crystal Growth & Design.

You can read more about this structure and the significance of this milestone at http://www.ccdc.cam.ac.uk/NewsandEvents/News/Pages/NewsItem.aspx?newsid=42 and in our blog post at http://www.ccdc.cam.ac.uk/Community/Blog/pages/BlogPost.aspx?bpid=58.

We take this opportunity to express our appreciation for the immense contribution made by researchers past and present to the continuing growth and success of the Cambridge Structural Database.”

As reported to the CHMINF-L on Oct. 23, 2015, by

Dr Ian Bruno: Director, Strategic Partnerships

The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC)

Tel: +44-1223-336013   Email: bruno@ccdc.cam.ac.uk

Directory of Open Access Journals — DOAJ

This directory of OA journals is hosted by Lund University Libraries in Sweden.  From their homepage: http://www.doaj.org:

“DOAJ is an online directory that indexes and provides access to high quality, open access, peer-reviewed journals.”   One can search by keywords or browse through broader and narrower subject headings.

These stats are from their website, accessed Sept. 28, 2015:

Seen in “Outstanding Websites of 2014”, Choice, Sept. 2015, p. 33

ProQuest full text of scholarly journal content soon indexed by Google Scholar

By Kurt Sanford, CEO

“ProQuest is enabling the full text of its scholarly journal content to be indexed in Google Scholar, improving discovery and research outcomes. Our goal is that by the third quarter of 2015, users starting their research in Google Scholar will be able to access full text via ProQuest.”

http://www.proquest.com/blog/pqblog/2015/Why-ProQuest-is-working-with-Google.html

Feed

Tuesday, 18th August 2015

ProQuest Scholarly Content Now Discoverable in Google Scholar

By Africa S. Hands

From No Shelf Required:

ProQuest has marked another milestone in ease of access to its rich research content. The full text of its scholarly content – including journals and working papers – is now indexed in Google Scholar, enabling Google Scholar users to seamlessly discover and access their library’s ProQuest collections. Efficiency and productivity for both ProQuest and Google Scholar users is improved, while libraries benefit from increased usage for their subscribed collections.

Full story >>

http://www.libraries.wright.edu/noshelfrequired/2015/08/12/proquest-scholarly-content-now-discoverable-in-google-scholar/

Source via: ResourceShelf Newsletter – 8th September 2015

[ResourceShelf] Newsletter 643

BioOne — adding 7 titles, but after 12/2015 ceasing to contain Entomological Soc. of Am. & Am. Soc. of Mammalogists publications

” BioOne adds seven new journals to BioOne Complete – 04 Sep 2015

BioOne, a nonprofit publisher that aims to make scientific research more accessible, has added seven new journals to BioOne Complete, its online aggregation of independently-published, subscribed and open-access titles.

Joining the subscribed aggregation in January 2016 will be: Caribbean Journal of Science, published by the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez; Journal of Entomological Science, published by the Georgia Entomological Society; Journal of the Lepidopterists’ Society, published by The Lepidopterists’ Society; and Systematic and Applied Acarology, published by the Systematic and Applied Acarology Society (UK). Joining BioOne Complete as open-access participants will be: Paleontological Contributions, published by The Paleontological Institute at The University of Kansas; and Palaeodiversity and Stuttgarter Beiträge zur Naturkunde A, both published by The Stuttgart State Museum of Natural History, Germany.

These titles represent a wealth of content in biodiversity conservation, entomology, paleontology, and natural history. Their collective backfile encompasses 48 years and over 12,000 new pages for BioOne Complete. In 2016, the aggregation will be home to 191 publications (130 current, 43 backfile-only, and 18 open-access titles), comprising over 1.2 million pages and growing daily. 78% of BioOne Complete’s subscribed titles are ranked in Thomson Reuters’ Journal Citation Reports, and 25% are based outside of the US. Furthermore, 73% of current titles are available in full-text XML exclusively through BioOne Complete.

Just as these new additions enhance a subscription to BioOne Complete, BioOne participation represents a key step forward for each of these nonprofit publishers to make their content more accessible to a global audience.

As of December 31, 2015, the publications of the Entomological Society of America and the American Society of Mammalogists will cease adding new content to BioOne Complete. In accordance with BioOne’s commitment to perpetual access, all previously deposited issues from 2000-2015 (sixteen years of content), will remain accessible to BioOne Complete subscribers in perpetuity.”

Source:  Knowledgespeak Newsletter, 9/4/2015

The Plant List

  • http://www.theplantlist.org/

    “As the website rather modestly states, The Plant List is “a working list of all known plant species.” In other words, botanically inspired readers will find on this site basic information about 1,293,685 (and counting) different plants. Readers may like to begin with How to use this site, a comprehensive section that describes how to search The Plant List, when it is useful or not useful to conduct a search, when it is more helpful to browse, and other tips and tidbits. After getting their bearings, readers may then want to delve into the list itself. For instance, the Browse tab allows readers to look into the four major groups (flowering plants, conifers, ferns, and mosses), and then dig down into family, genera, and species. For science teachers looking for new resources to offer their students, or for anyone fascinated by plants, this collaboration between the Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew, and the Missouri Botanical Garden is a truly comprehensive resource. [CNH]”

  • Source: The Scout Report — Volume 21, Number 32 (HTML), Aug. 21, 2015

SCOPUS reviewed in Choice, January, 2015

Scopus. Elsevier.http://www.elsevier.com/online-tools/scopus.

A very complimentary review by –J. N. Jeffryes, University of Minnesota

“Scopus’s nearest competitor is Web of Science http://thomsonreuters.com/thomson-reuters-web-of-science/ (CH, Jan’11, 48-2436), and the two tools remain somewhat complementary.  For post-1996 information, Scopus comes off as the more impressive of the two with its advanced citation analysis visualizations, wider inclusion of conference papers, and adoption of alternative impact metrics.  Because the citation counts and h index calculations go back only to 1996, Web of Science has the historical edge.  In the areas of interface design and record readability, Scopus is the stronger tool.  It provides an intuitive search format to explore an impressively broad base of research; if the depth of coverage were expanded (or as 1996 becomes more distant), this tool would become even more valuable.  Even as it is today, it is a very valuable resource for academic and professional libraries. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above”

The complete review is here:  http://www.cro3.org/content/52/05/52-2504.full

 

 

EPA Coal Plant Emissions Data included in TOXMAP

10 Dec 2014

*NLM Technical Bulletin, Nov-Dec 2014, NLM Resource Update: TOXMAP Now Includes EPA Coal Plant Emissions Data

Data was obtained from the Air Markets Program Data (AMPD) tool, a publicly-available data system for searching and downloading data collected as part of EPA emissions trading programs. In 2013, about 2.1 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions were attributable to electricity generated from coal.

TOXMAP is a Geographic Information System (GIS) from NLM that uses maps of the United States to help users visually explore data from the EPA Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) and Superfund Programs.

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/nd14/brief/nd14_epa_coal_plant_emissions_data.html

World Library of Science introduced by UNESCO

UNESCO has launched the World Library of Science. “The library will be accessible to internet users everywhere in the world, at no cost. The majority of the content is for university-level students, giving them resources to ‘complement their learning’.”  Target groups are students and teachers in the more underdeveloped parts of the world, especially, Africa.  “The library – WLoS – ‘contains’ more than 300 articles, 25 eBooks and some 70 videos, as well as a digital platform that “provides a community hub” for learning, according to UNESCO, which created the site jointly with the international Nature Education publishing group and the Swiss pharmaceutical company Roche.

“The library – WLoS – ‘contains’ more than 300 articles, 25 eBooks and some 70 videos, as well as a digital platform that “provides a community hub” for learning, according to UNESCO, which created the site jointly with the international Nature Education publishing group and the Swiss pharmaceutical company Roche.”

From ResearchBuzz Saturday Afternoon Buzz, November 15th, 2014, Tara Calishain