Earth Day videos — on Water & our Changing Planet

Celebrate Earth Day with Changing Planet and Sustainability: Water

In preparation for Earth Day on April 22, explore NBC Learn’s Original Collections Changing Planet and Sustainability: Water. These earth science series, produced in partnership with the National Science Foundation, cover headline issues from the future of California’s water supply to how butterflies are adapting to warmer temperatures. Use these videos to engage and involve your students in the environmental issues in the news today.

Changing Planet             Sustainability: Water

K-12 | HigherEd               K-12 | HigherEd

Source:  NBC Learn April 2014 Newsletter

One can sign up for a free trial.

Knovel updates Yaws’ Critical Properties and Crude Oil Assays

From today’s Knowledgespeak Newsletter (of the STM publishing industry):
Knovel expands Crude Oil Assay Database and boosts Chemical Data Records
Two of Knovel’s Critical Content Databases have received significant updates. Yaws’ Critical Property Database for Chemical Engineers and Chemists has increased by 160,000 data records to include almost 450,000 records in total. With this update, Knovel offers the largest compilation of correlations for chemical engineers online. In addition, the Crude Oil Assay Database has expanded to feature over 400 assays.
More

Princeton has a subscription to Knovel.  The Knovel database is constituted mainly of engineering resources…some manipulable.

 

 

Finding NCDC Climate Data and Resources

NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration presented an online webinar on Feb. 26, 2014.  From their description:

  • Duration: 40 minutes
  • Speakers:
    • Greg Hammer , Meteorologist, NCDC
    • Scott Stephens, Meteorologist, NCDC
    • Stuart Hinson, Meteorologist, NCDC
    • Mara Sprain, MALS Librarian, NCDC
    • Susan Osborne, Technical Writer and Communications Specialist, NCDC

“Summary: NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) maintains the world’s largest climate data archive and provides climatological services and data to every sector of the United States economy and to users worldwide. Records in the archive range from paleoclimatic data, to centuries-old journals, to data less than an hour old. The Center’s mission is to preserve these data and make them available to the public, business, industry, government, and researchers.

Data come to NCDC from not only land-based stations but also from ships, buoys, weather balloons, radars, satellites, and even sophisticated weather and climate models. With these data, NCDC develops national and global datasets. The datasets are used to maximize the use of our climatic and natural resources while also minimizing the risks caused by climate variability and weather extremes. NCDC has a statutory mission to describe the climate of the United States, and it acts as the “Nation’s Scorekeeper” regarding the trends and anomalies of weather and climate. NCDC’s climate data have been used in a variety of applications including agriculture, air quality, construction, education, energy, engineering, forestry, health, insurance, landscape design, livestock management, manufacturing, national security, recreation and tourism, retailing, transportation, and water resources management.”

“Participation is free, however registration is required. Upon registering, an e-mail confirmation of registration will include instructions for joining the Webinar. …Parts 2 and 3 of the webinar series will be presented in the spring of 2014. More information will come out on those individual webinars later.”

The NCDC webinar is directly at: http://login.icohere.com/connect/d_connect_itemframer.cfm?vsDTTitle=NCDC%20%2D%20The%20World%3Fs%20Largest%20Climate%20Data%20Archive&dseq=18332&dtseq=84935&emdisc=2&mkey=public1172&vbDTA=0&viNA=0&vsDTA=&PAN=2&bDTC=0&blog=0&vsSH=A

Government webinars are listed here: http://login.icohere.com/public/topics.cfm?cseq=1172.

 

Microbe World

URL:www.microbeworld.org
  • Lots of information over a variety of topics
    • Poor site organization—two separate navigational toolbars
    • Source: GEN “Best of the Web”, Sep 15, 2013 (Vol. 33, No. 16)
    • Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News
    • From American Society for Microbiology

WorldCat database reaches 2 billion holdings

“WorldCat is a database of bibliographic information created and continuously updated by some 25,000 OCLC member libraries around the world. WorldCat records describe specific works and contain a listing of institutions that own an item, referred to as “holdings.” Institutions use holdings information to create local catalogs, arrange interlibrary loans and conduct reference work.”

“WorldCat was created in 1971 so that libraries could share cataloging information from a central database, increasing workflow efficiency and the ability to locate and loan materials. It took the OCLC cooperative almost 34 years, from August 26, 1971 to August 11, 2005, to add 1 billion holdings in WorldCat. It has taken just seven years and eight months to add the next billion.” 

“WorldCat spans six millennia of recorded knowledge, from about 4800 B.C. to the present. It encompasses records for books, serials, sound recordings, musical scores, maps, visual materials, mixed materials and computer files.”

From OCLC Member Update [oclc@oclc.org]

“Find more about WorldCat on the OCLC website, and watch WorldCat grow as libraries around the world contribute to the database.”

(Holdings constitute a higher number than titles.  A(nother) holding is counted for each library that owns a title.

Molecular Movies Illustrate Science

Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News [update@genengnewsmail.com]

Feb 15, 2013 (Vol. 33, No. 4)

MolecularMovies.org

“If you get a kick out of beautifully animated scientific movies, then you’ll be beside yourself with excitement when you visit MolecularMovies.org, a site that has compiled a large number of science animations from all over the web. Links to the animations can be found on the “showcase” page, where users can sort animations by scientific area, animator, or date added, can search all animations by keyword, or can jump to animations falling within a given scientific topic. There are 22 topics represented, and they range from adhesion/extracellular matrix, to DNA/chromatin, to neuronal signaling, and beyond. The animations are not embedded within this site itself, and there do exist a few problems with some of the links; however, most of the links worked as expected. Beyond the animations, the Molecular Movies site also includes some software animation tutorials and a newsfeed covering the latest in molecular animation.”

*The opinions expressed are solely those of the author(s) and should not be construed as reflecting the viewpoints of the publisher, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., the publishing house, or employees and affiliates thereof.

 Rating = 4 stars = excellent

Strong points: large collection of animations

Weak points:  some links didn’t work

www.molecularmovies.com

 

Image database available now in the Princeton University Library collection

Image Quest  

Over two million images of objects, events, places, works of art, sports, and scientific pursuits, from dozens of collections such as Getty Images and the National Geographic Society. Each image includes full citation and copyright information. Rights have been cleared for education use.  (Britannica’s compilation from over 50 of the world’s best collections.)

From  Bobray Bordelon, March 6, 2013

MeSH, Medical Subject Headings from NLM (National Library of Medicine)

MeSH is a great resource,a thesaurus, especially significant if you access Medline – from whatever source.  (PubMed is the free version, accessible everywhere anyone has access to the internet.)

MeSH means Medical Subject Headings.  They are assigned by indexers at the National Library of Medicine.  This thesaurus is complete with definitions or scope notes.  It is organized in a hierarchical fashion so that if you wanted to search all antibiotics, for example, you wouldn’t have to separately type all of them, but could just “explode” the main heading.  You can limit the headings to a major concept, the most important concept(s) in the article.  You can also attach subheadings, such as adverse effects of antibiotics.