Finding NCDC Climate Data and Resources

NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration presented an online webinar on Feb. 26, 2014.  From their description:

  • Duration: 40 minutes
  • Speakers:
    • Greg Hammer , Meteorologist, NCDC
    • Scott Stephens, Meteorologist, NCDC
    • Stuart Hinson, Meteorologist, NCDC
    • Mara Sprain, MALS Librarian, NCDC
    • Susan Osborne, Technical Writer and Communications Specialist, NCDC

“Summary: NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) maintains the world’s largest climate data archive and provides climatological services and data to every sector of the United States economy and to users worldwide. Records in the archive range from paleoclimatic data, to centuries-old journals, to data less than an hour old. The Center’s mission is to preserve these data and make them available to the public, business, industry, government, and researchers.

Data come to NCDC from not only land-based stations but also from ships, buoys, weather balloons, radars, satellites, and even sophisticated weather and climate models. With these data, NCDC develops national and global datasets. The datasets are used to maximize the use of our climatic and natural resources while also minimizing the risks caused by climate variability and weather extremes. NCDC has a statutory mission to describe the climate of the United States, and it acts as the “Nation’s Scorekeeper” regarding the trends and anomalies of weather and climate. NCDC’s climate data have been used in a variety of applications including agriculture, air quality, construction, education, energy, engineering, forestry, health, insurance, landscape design, livestock management, manufacturing, national security, recreation and tourism, retailing, transportation, and water resources management.”

“Participation is free, however registration is required. Upon registering, an e-mail confirmation of registration will include instructions for joining the Webinar. …Parts 2 and 3 of the webinar series will be presented in the spring of 2014. More information will come out on those individual webinars later.”

The NCDC webinar is directly at: http://login.icohere.com/connect/d_connect_itemframer.cfm?vsDTTitle=NCDC%20%2D%20The%20World%3Fs%20Largest%20Climate%20Data%20Archive&dseq=18332&dtseq=84935&emdisc=2&mkey=public1172&vbDTA=0&viNA=0&vsDTA=&PAN=2&bDTC=0&blog=0&vsSH=A

Government webinars are listed here: http://login.icohere.com/public/topics.cfm?cseq=1172.

 

New Ocean Climate Change Web Portal (NOAA)

The NOAA and NOAA Fisheries are collaborating in a new ocean climate change Web portal in trying to assess the effects of climate change on fish.

What is the Ocean Climate Change Web Portal?

“It’s an online system that provides an easy way to display maps of climate data, such as ocean temperature and salinity, over portions of the globe. For example, it can allow you to view how the temperature in the North Atlantic would change in the 21st century as compared with the 20th century.”

Reported by ResearchBuzz, Tara Calishain, Mar. 5, 2014.

International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) & ORCID IDs

ORCID spells out structure of 16-digit identifier

ORCID, an international, interdisciplinary, open and not-for-profit organisation, recently revealed information on what an ORCID identifier looks like.

The ORCID ID is a 16-digit number that is compatible with the ISO Standard (ISO 27729), also known as the International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI). Initially, ORCID IDs will be randomly assigned by the ORCID Registry from a block of numbers that will not conflict with ISNI-formatted numbers assigned in other ways. ORCID IDs always need all 16-digits – they cannot be shortened to remove leading zeros if they exist.

Only the ORCID Registry will assign ORCID IDs, either through the ORCID website, or the related APIs. ORCID IDs are intended to be assigned to individuals, and may be secured at no charge. The IDs will be assigned randomly from a block of numbers reserved for this purpose. (Initially IDs will be assigned between 0000-0001-5000-0000 and 0000-0003-5000-000X).

ORCID IDs will be expressed as an HTTP URI. The number will be proceeded by ‘http://orcid.org/‘. A hyphen will be inserted every 4 digits to aid readability, though if the hyphens are removed, the number still refers to the same ORCID ID.”

Source:  Knowledgespeak Newsletter 8/9/12

Need help with a data management plan? Try DMPTool

dmp_tool_banner_verbose

Many U.S. funding agencies are now requiring researchers to submit a data management plan with their grant applications. DMPTool* provides guidance in creating ready to use data management plans for:

NIH, NEH, NOAA, NSF, Gordan and Betty Moore, IMLS

The tool has been customized for Princeton users.  Log in with your Princeton NetID for additional Princeton specific help links and suggested text for researchers who will be using the DataSpace repository. Simply select Princeton University and log in with your Princeton netID and password.

Want to learn more?

View a brief video demonstration of the tool at https://dmp.cdlib.org/help/video_demo

Attend the Lunch ‘n Learn session on April 24th at Noon in the Frist Multipurpose Room. http://www.princeton.edu/etc/seminars

For more general information about the data management plans visit:
http://libguides.princeton.edu/nsf-dmp

*DMPTool was developed by DataONE, Digital Curation Centre (UK), Smithsonian Institution, UC Curation Center, California Digital Library, UCLA Library, UC San Diego Libraries, University of Illinois, and University of Virginia Libraries.

Institute for Web Science (UK) not to get funding…

However, [Tim] "Berners-Lee and [Nigel] Shadbolt are hopeful that earlier statements and commitments by members of the new government to open government data indicate that support for open-linked data initiatives will continue, despite the cuts. They believe that the http://data.gov.uk website, a similar initiative to the U.S. government’s www.data.gov portal, will continue to grow over the coming months. The U.S. service now has more than 270,000 data sets available for developers. The U.K. version is somewhat smaller with a little more than 3,000 data sets."

Source:  Jim Ashling. Information Today. Medford: Jul/Aug 2010. Vol. 27, Iss. 7; pg. 20, 2 pgs

http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?RQT=569&curl=http%3A%2F%2Fproquest.umi.com%2Fpqdweb%3Fdid%3D2080617381%26sid%3D1%26Fmt%3D3%26clientId%3D17210%26RQT%3D309%26VName%3DPQD&TS=1279289390  (whole article)