Knovel updates Yaws’ Critical Properties and Crude Oil Assays

From today’s Knowledgespeak Newsletter (of the STM publishing industry):
Knovel expands Crude Oil Assay Database and boosts Chemical Data Records
Two of Knovel’s Critical Content Databases have received significant updates. Yaws’ Critical Property Database for Chemical Engineers and Chemists has increased by 160,000 data records to include almost 450,000 records in total. With this update, Knovel offers the largest compilation of correlations for chemical engineers online. In addition, the Crude Oil Assay Database has expanded to feature over 400 assays.
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Princeton has a subscription to Knovel.  The Knovel database is constituted mainly of engineering resources…some manipulable.

 

 

Video Portal from Science, the journal

Science: Video Portal

http://video.sciencemag.org/

“The folks at Science magazine craft a wide palette of audio visual materials, many of which can be accessed through their video portal. In the Featured Videos, visitors can learn about some recent explorations into education reform, deep sea explorations, and the Higgs boson. Scrolling down the site, visitors will notice that the videos are divided into seven sections, including Engineering, Environment, and Medicine. It’s easy to see how these videos could be effectively used in a number of classroom situations to complement existing lectures and presentations. New users might do well to start with the “Alya Red: A Computational Heart” video and the rather thoughtful “California Meteorite Rush.” ”

Source:  The Scout Report (Univ. of Wisconsin)  – May 3, 2013

Fusion Energy Education

Fusion Energy Education

·http://fusedweb.llnl.gov/CPEP/

“The basics of fusion are deceptively simple: the process powers the sun and other stars, and it all takes place when atomic nuclei collide at high speed. But many questions remain. How can humans develop and exploit fusion energy? Is there a way to convert it more efficiently into useful mechanical, electrical, or thermal energy? This intriguing site, created by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, presents an online fusion course designed to teach students and others about how fusion works and how it might be harnessed in the future. Visitors can try out The Guided Tour to get started, or they can click on one of the Main Topics. These include Energy Sources and Conversions, Two Key Fusion Reactions, and Creating the Conditions for Fusion. Each section contains graphics, explanatory text, and various diagrams. The site also includes charts which can be printed out for classroom use.”

Source:  The Scout Report, University of Wisconsin, May 31, 2013

Journal of Molecular and Engineering Materials

Free access is offered through 31 December, 2013.  One must register though:

http://www.worldscientific.com/jmem

“Targets” reviews, communications and regular papers.  Intersects the fields of materials and molecular science.  Wants high-impact works in: materials design, synthesis, growth, analysis, characterization, properties and functions, fabrication and device manufacturing, and system integration and applications of materials.