Scopus has added 5 million pre-1996 articles and over 93 million references

“Scopus has added 5 million pre-1996 articles and over 93 million references – and we’re not even half-way

on Thu, 11/26/2015 – 16:06

As of this week, Scopus has added 5 million pre-1996 records including over 93 million references to the database. This has been done in two ways: by adding pre-1996 cited references to existing articles in Scopus and by adding article back files, including their cited references, coming from archives from various publishers, going back to 1970.

This milestone is the result of the ongoing Scopus Cited Reference Expansion Program initiated in March 2014 that aims to include cited references in Scopus going back to 1970 for pre-1996 content. The goal of this expansion program is to further enhance the ability for Scopus users to perform long-term, extensive bibliometric and historic trend analyses – and to enhance and further complete the h-index for researchers who published pre-1996.

Archives already completed include the following publishers: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). American Physical Society (APS), Karger Publishers, Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC), Springer, American Medical Association (AMA), Inderscience and Elsevier.

Additional archives currently in process include: Wiley Blackwell, BioMedCentral (BMC), Taylor & Francis, Oxford University Press, Society of Automotive Engineers International, (SAE), Walter de Gruyter, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), Institute of Physics (IoP), Brill Publishers, Sage, Emerald Group Publishing, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and the American Geophysical Union (AGU).

We will keep you updated on the progress of this Expansion Program, and make sure to follow this blog or our Twitter account to stay up to date.”

Release Date:
November 26 2015

Find Altmetrics for articles — Put “Altmetric it” on your toolbar

Under the logo or “badge”, you can find instructions on how to put the bookmarklet on your toolbar.  Webinars are available, too.

“EDP Sciences has recently added the Altmetric data for the following journals:

Altmetric data gives users a more complete picture of how people are engaging with scholarly literature by tracking a variety of sources, including news, social media, bookmarking and peer-review forums, to provide data on the online activity surrounding each research article.

Readers can click on the Altmetric badge to view the original mention and explore the news stories, tweets, blogs and more for themselves.

This data is important to both authors and readers, helping them understand the wider dissemination of research, and allows them to engage in online conversations they may not have been aware of.


See for more information.”

American Attitudes about the Environment

Inaugural Survey of American Attitudes About the Environment Released by the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies and the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research

“The Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research today released the first set of findings from its inaugural environment poll. The poll surveys a nationally representative sample of American adults and provides a portrait of what the public thinks and feels about environmental issues, and what actions they are taking as consumers.”

– University of Chicago

Source:  Newswise LifeWire for 15-Dec-2014

Institute of Biodiversity Genomics, Smithsonian Institution

Smithsonian Jumps Into Biodiversity Genomics With New Institute

“On the heels of two vast analyses of the genomes of both birds and insects, the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., has announced that it will launch a virtual biodiversity genomics institute to accelerate efforts to capture and catalog all the DNA from Earth’s flora and fauna. Science, 12/12”


From: Total E-Clips <>

To read more:

International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) & ORCID IDs

ORCID spells out structure of 16-digit identifier

ORCID, an international, interdisciplinary, open and not-for-profit organisation, recently revealed information on what an ORCID identifier looks like.

The ORCID ID is a 16-digit number that is compatible with the ISO Standard (ISO 27729), also known as the International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI). Initially, ORCID IDs will be randomly assigned by the ORCID Registry from a block of numbers that will not conflict with ISNI-formatted numbers assigned in other ways. ORCID IDs always need all 16-digits – they cannot be shortened to remove leading zeros if they exist.

Only the ORCID Registry will assign ORCID IDs, either through the ORCID website, or the related APIs. ORCID IDs are intended to be assigned to individuals, and may be secured at no charge. The IDs will be assigned randomly from a block of numbers reserved for this purpose. (Initially IDs will be assigned between 0000-0001-5000-0000 and 0000-0003-5000-000X).

ORCID IDs will be expressed as an HTTP URI. The number will be proceeded by ‘‘. A hyphen will be inserted every 4 digits to aid readability, though if the hyphens are removed, the number still refers to the same ORCID ID.”

Source:  Knowledgespeak Newsletter 8/9/12

Public Reaction to Science Research @ FAS website

The FAS, the Federation of American Scientists has created a new tool to examine  Public Reaction to Science Research, on their website.  It will help to measure  public understanding of science and the importance of communicating science to the public.

"The module is the latest addition to the FAS Case Studies in Dual Use Biological Research multimedia online education material. The series illustrates the implications of dual-use biological research through case studies of researchers and provides a historical background on bioterrorism, bioweapons and the current laws, regulations and treaties that apply to biodefense research. Continuing development and expansion of the case studies is funded in part through a grant by the Carnegie Corporation of New York."

From Knowledgespeak Newsletter, Mar. 23, 2009.