Finding NCDC Climate Data and Resources

NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration presented an online webinar on Feb. 26, 2014.  From their description:

  • Duration: 40 minutes
  • Speakers:
    • Greg Hammer , Meteorologist, NCDC
    • Scott Stephens, Meteorologist, NCDC
    • Stuart Hinson, Meteorologist, NCDC
    • Mara Sprain, MALS Librarian, NCDC
    • Susan Osborne, Technical Writer and Communications Specialist, NCDC

“Summary: NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) maintains the world’s largest climate data archive and provides climatological services and data to every sector of the United States economy and to users worldwide. Records in the archive range from paleoclimatic data, to centuries-old journals, to data less than an hour old. The Center’s mission is to preserve these data and make them available to the public, business, industry, government, and researchers.

Data come to NCDC from not only land-based stations but also from ships, buoys, weather balloons, radars, satellites, and even sophisticated weather and climate models. With these data, NCDC develops national and global datasets. The datasets are used to maximize the use of our climatic and natural resources while also minimizing the risks caused by climate variability and weather extremes. NCDC has a statutory mission to describe the climate of the United States, and it acts as the “Nation’s Scorekeeper” regarding the trends and anomalies of weather and climate. NCDC’s climate data have been used in a variety of applications including agriculture, air quality, construction, education, energy, engineering, forestry, health, insurance, landscape design, livestock management, manufacturing, national security, recreation and tourism, retailing, transportation, and water resources management.”

“Participation is free, however registration is required. Upon registering, an e-mail confirmation of registration will include instructions for joining the Webinar. …Parts 2 and 3 of the webinar series will be presented in the spring of 2014. More information will come out on those individual webinars later.”

The NCDC webinar is directly at: http://login.icohere.com/connect/d_connect_itemframer.cfm?vsDTTitle=NCDC%20%2D%20The%20World%3Fs%20Largest%20Climate%20Data%20Archive&dseq=18332&dtseq=84935&emdisc=2&mkey=public1172&vbDTA=0&viNA=0&vsDTA=&PAN=2&bDTC=0&blog=0&vsSH=A

Government webinars are listed here: http://login.icohere.com/public/topics.cfm?cseq=1172.

 

Need help with a data management plan? Try DMPTool

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Many U.S. funding agencies are now requiring researchers to submit a data management plan with their grant applications. DMPTool* provides guidance in creating ready to use data management plans for:

NIH, NEH, NOAA, NSF, Gordan and Betty Moore, IMLS

The tool has been customized for Princeton users.  Log in with your Princeton NetID for additional Princeton specific help links and suggested text for researchers who will be using the DataSpace repository. Simply select Princeton University and log in with your Princeton netID and password.

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View a brief video demonstration of the tool at https://dmp.cdlib.org/help/video_demo

Attend the Lunch ‘n Learn session on April 24th at Noon in the Frist Multipurpose Room. http://www.princeton.edu/etc/seminars

For more general information about the data management plans visit:
http://libguides.princeton.edu/nsf-dmp

*DMPTool was developed by DataONE, Digital Curation Centre (UK), Smithsonian Institution, UC Curation Center, California Digital Library, UCLA Library, UC San Diego Libraries, University of Illinois, and University of Virginia Libraries.

PubMed Central = PMC

US PubMed Central renamed PMC, adopts new web page design – 06 Aug 2012

PubMed Central, the repository of the US’ National Institutes of Health, has shortened its name to PMC in a bid to avoid being confused with PubMed. It has also gone for a new look and feel, and has been updated to conform to NCBI’s new standards for page design. The redesign is seen to allow for a cleaner and more uniform presentation across PMC’s site as well as its article, issue and journal archive pages.

For instance, the journal logo is on the page centre, with additional white space. The navigation links are designed to be more compact while the font colours are more uniform across the site. The article pages have also been enhanced by a more compact presentation for article front matter, featuring links to author information, article notes and copyright and licence information.

The views for tables and figures have been enhanced. Other improvements to the new article page include easier readability and navigation, including links to the various article formats, and to the corresponding article citation in PubMed as well as to those PubMed citations that are related to the article.

There is also an enhanced look for bibliographic citations that are referenced in the article. Finally, at the top of each section of an article, the “Go to” navigation links offer a drop down menu that takes the reader to any section more quickly and easily, whether it’s the Abstract, Introduction, Discussion, or any others within the article page.

Click here

Source: Knowledgespeak Newsletter, Aug. 6, 2012

NTIS launches National Technical Reports Library Version 3.0 – 16 May 2012

 

“The National Technical Information Service (NTIS) of the U.S. Department of Commerce has announced the launch of the next generation National Technical Reports Library Version 3.0, also known as NTRL V3.0.

The NTRL V3.0 is now publicly available after two years of research and development. Through the utilisation of the open-source platform Fedora/SOLR, the NTRL V3.0 builds upon the successes of previous iterations by offering the public online access to the large NTIS repository of scientific and technical information through the use of enhanced functionalities, features and improved display.

The NTIS repository consists of over 2 million bibliographic records representing billions of dollars in federally-funded research performed over the past 70 years with a broad scope of Scientific, Technical & Engineering Information (STEI) subject coverage. NTIS sought to improve dissemination of STEI, and economic, social and environmental information by permanently enlarging, preserving and providing ready access to its repository.

The NTIS seeks to actively collect, preserve and disseminate STEI and other information thereby supporting the Department of Commerce mission to promote U.S. economic growth by providing access to information that stimulates innovation and discovery. The NTRL V3.0 represents the NTIS commitment to ensuring access to this invaluable repository is affordable, convenient, and widely available to the academic, corporate, library and government communities, and to the public-at-large.

The NTRL V3.0 was developed by the Federal Science Repository Service (FSRS) a public-private partnership between NTIS and Information International Associates, Inc. (IIa) of Oak Ridge, TN. The intent of the public-private partnership was to create an Institutional Repository (IR) Service for federal agencies.”

Source: Knowledgespeak Newsletter, May 16, 2012