NOVA has a Physics Blog

NOVA’s Physics Blog

·http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/physics/blog/

“NOVA’s Physics Blog is billed as “the physics of nothing, everything, and all the things in between.” This “Nature of Reality” blog promises “a space that welcomes big ideas about space, time, and the universe.” The posts here include graphics, animations, and other visually compelling materials. Visitors can scroll down on the right side of the page to look over Recent Posts, Recent Comments, and the contributors to the blog. It’s a diverse group, including mathematician James Stein and physicist Frank Wilczek. Recent posts include “Why is the Higgs So Light?” and “Scientific Approaches to the Fine-Tuning Problem.” Each entry concludes with the Go Deeper area, which features the editor’s picks for further reading. [KMG]

Source:  Today’s Scout Report from the University of Wisconsin

Applied Math and Science Education Repository — AMSER

The Applied Math and Science Education Repository is aimed at providing web resources for community colleges, technical schools, and the general public.  The link takes you to the science — and technology — resources.

From their home page: "AMSER is a portal of educational resources and services built specifically for use by those in Community and Technical Colleges but free for anyone to use."

"AMSER is funded by the National Science Foundation as part of the National Science Digital Library, and is being created by a team of project partners led by Internet Scout."

Cornell University Library Historical Math Monographs Collection

Cornell University Library Historical Math Monographs Collection

http://digital.library.cornell.edu/m/math/

"The Cornell University Library Historical Math Monographs Collection has a rather interesting history. The collection began when a number of brittle and decaying math monographs were digitally scanned using equipment developed by Cornell and the Xerox Corporation. This collection brings together all of those documents, including a selection of other relevant papers and scholarly works. All told, there are over 1,000 works here, and visitors can use the "Browse" section to look over the offerings by title or author. Additionally, visitors can perform detailed searches across the entire collection. Visitors should also take a look at the "Selected Titles" on the homepage to get a sense of what lies within this rather compelling collection. Finally, there is a "Help" section that provides some hints on making the best use of the site."

Source:  The Scout Report from the University of Wisconsin, 27 Feb, 2009