AAS Journals published with IOP, online only as of 2015

“As the Library Liaison for the American Astronomical Society (AAS), I attended their board meeting last week.

The AAS and IOP Publishing (IOP) have asked though that I announce immediately that all AAS research journals published with IOP will become electronic only and will no longer print paper editions. This transition will take effect with the 2015 subscription year and affects the Astronomical Journal (AJ) and the Astrophysical Journal (ApJ), Astrophysical Journal Letters (ApJL), and Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series (ApJS).

Electronic-only publication will allow for further development of the AAS journals, outside of the constraints of print providing even better service to subscribers, authors and readers.

Full details can be found in this press release.”

http://ioppublishing.org/newsDetails/american-astronomical-society-journals-going-electronic-only

Barbara Kern,  Chair, PAM/SLA

Knovel updates Yaws’ Critical Properties and Crude Oil Assays

From today’s Knowledgespeak Newsletter (of the STM publishing industry):
Knovel expands Crude Oil Assay Database and boosts Chemical Data Records
Two of Knovel’s Critical Content Databases have received significant updates. Yaws’ Critical Property Database for Chemical Engineers and Chemists has increased by 160,000 data records to include almost 450,000 records in total. With this update, Knovel offers the largest compilation of correlations for chemical engineers online. In addition, the Crude Oil Assay Database has expanded to feature over 400 assays.
More

Princeton has a subscription to Knovel.  The Knovel database is constituted mainly of engineering resources…some manipulable.

 

 

Finding NCDC Climate Data and Resources

NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration presented an online webinar on Feb. 26, 2014.  From their description:

  • Duration: 40 minutes
  • Speakers:
    • Greg Hammer , Meteorologist, NCDC
    • Scott Stephens, Meteorologist, NCDC
    • Stuart Hinson, Meteorologist, NCDC
    • Mara Sprain, MALS Librarian, NCDC
    • Susan Osborne, Technical Writer and Communications Specialist, NCDC

“Summary: NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) maintains the world’s largest climate data archive and provides climatological services and data to every sector of the United States economy and to users worldwide. Records in the archive range from paleoclimatic data, to centuries-old journals, to data less than an hour old. The Center’s mission is to preserve these data and make them available to the public, business, industry, government, and researchers.

Data come to NCDC from not only land-based stations but also from ships, buoys, weather balloons, radars, satellites, and even sophisticated weather and climate models. With these data, NCDC develops national and global datasets. The datasets are used to maximize the use of our climatic and natural resources while also minimizing the risks caused by climate variability and weather extremes. NCDC has a statutory mission to describe the climate of the United States, and it acts as the “Nation’s Scorekeeper” regarding the trends and anomalies of weather and climate. NCDC’s climate data have been used in a variety of applications including agriculture, air quality, construction, education, energy, engineering, forestry, health, insurance, landscape design, livestock management, manufacturing, national security, recreation and tourism, retailing, transportation, and water resources management.”

“Participation is free, however registration is required. Upon registering, an e-mail confirmation of registration will include instructions for joining the Webinar. …Parts 2 and 3 of the webinar series will be presented in the spring of 2014. More information will come out on those individual webinars later.”

The NCDC webinar is directly at: http://login.icohere.com/connect/d_connect_itemframer.cfm?vsDTTitle=NCDC%20%2D%20The%20World%3Fs%20Largest%20Climate%20Data%20Archive&dseq=18332&dtseq=84935&emdisc=2&mkey=public1172&vbDTA=0&viNA=0&vsDTA=&PAN=2&bDTC=0&blog=0&vsSH=A

Government webinars are listed here: http://login.icohere.com/public/topics.cfm?cseq=1172.

 

Climate Change, new publication from NAS & Royal Society

NAS, Royal Society Release Publication on Climate Change 

“The U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the Royal Society, the national science academy of the U.K., released a new joint publication that explains the clear evidence that humans are causing the climate to change, and that addresses a variety of other key questions commonly asked about climate change science. “ClimatechangeNAS

From What’s New @ the National Academies, Feb.,27, 2014

International Year of Crystallography – 2014, IYCr 2014

International Year of Crystallography (IYCr 2014)

  • Author: ChemistryViews.org
  • Published: 01 January 2014
  • Copyright: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany

thumbnail image: International Year of Crystallography (IYCr 2014)

The International Year of Crystallography 2014 (IYCr 2014) highlights the continuing importance of crystallography.
It celebrates the centennial of X-ray diffraction. William Henry and William Lawrence Bragg showed that diffracted X-rays can be used to map the positions of atoms within a crystal. This allowed the detailed study of crystalline material.

Additionally, it commemorates the 400th anniversary of Kepler’s first studies which lead in 1611 to the observation of the symmetrical form of ice crystals. This was the beginning of the wider study of the role of symmetry in matter.


Article Views: 152

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From Wendy Warr, PhD, CHMINF-L, Jan. 2, 2014

Fusion Energy Education

Fusion Energy Education

·http://fusedweb.llnl.gov/CPEP/

“The basics of fusion are deceptively simple: the process powers the sun and other stars, and it all takes place when atomic nuclei collide at high speed. But many questions remain. How can humans develop and exploit fusion energy? Is there a way to convert it more efficiently into useful mechanical, electrical, or thermal energy? This intriguing site, created by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, presents an online fusion course designed to teach students and others about how fusion works and how it might be harnessed in the future. Visitors can try out The Guided Tour to get started, or they can click on one of the Main Topics. These include Energy Sources and Conversions, Two Key Fusion Reactions, and Creating the Conditions for Fusion. Each section contains graphics, explanatory text, and various diagrams. The site also includes charts which can be printed out for classroom use.”

Source:  The Scout Report, University of Wisconsin, May 31, 2013

NOVA has a Physics Blog

NOVA’s Physics Blog

·http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/physics/blog/

“NOVA’s Physics Blog is billed as “the physics of nothing, everything, and all the things in between.” This “Nature of Reality” blog promises “a space that welcomes big ideas about space, time, and the universe.” The posts here include graphics, animations, and other visually compelling materials. Visitors can scroll down on the right side of the page to look over Recent Posts, Recent Comments, and the contributors to the blog. It’s a diverse group, including mathematician James Stein and physicist Frank Wilczek. Recent posts include “Why is the Higgs So Light?” and “Scientific Approaches to the Fine-Tuning Problem.” Each entry concludes with the Go Deeper area, which features the editor’s picks for further reading. [KMG]

Source:  Today’s Scout Report from the University of Wisconsin

Interactive Physics Simulations

“Interactive Physics Simulations [Flash]

http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulations/category/physics

At the top of this site’s homepage, visitors will see a banner that proclaims “Over 70 million simulations delivered.” Needless to say, the Interactive Physics Simulations site is quite popular, and the offerings here can be used in the classroom or by persons with a general curiosity about static electricity, alpha decay, and other related topics. The site is sponsored by a range of institutions, including the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and the National Science Foundation. The site includes three dozen different simulations, many of which are available in over a dozen languages, including French, Russian, Chinese, Italian, and Vietnamese. First-time visitors might want to start with the “Build an Atom” which affords visitors the opportunity to build an atom out of protons, neutrons, and electrons and then play a fun game after they’re done. Also, users can look at the simulations by topical headings, which include “Sound & Waves”, “Heat & Thermo”, and “Light & Radition”. ”

Source:  Scout Report, Univ. of Wisconsin, Apr. 13, 2012

Springer offers personal copies of their e-books for ~$25

"More than 15,000 books included at $24.95/24,95 euros each

The MyCopy offer is currently valid on more than 15,000 electronic Springer books published since 2005. The new soft cover edition is branded as a MyCopy book with a color cover and black and white book content.
 
 

All books will be sold at the same price, $24.95 for customers in the US and Canada or 24,95 euros in Europe. Each price includes shipping and handling. Local VAT will be added.

 
 

MyCopy books can only be ordered by registered patrons of academic libraries that have purchased the corresponding eBook Collection. The entire ordering and shipping process will be handled by Springer in cooperation with a print-on-demand (POD) provider."

Princeton University subscribes to most of Springer’s ebook packages.

Source: a Springeralerts email, June

Journal Citation data released for 2009

Journal Citation Reports (JCR) now has 10 years of journal metrics available:

Journal Citation Reports  (1999+)  (Science & Social Science Editions.)

From Information services provider Thomson Reuters, US, "JCR claims to be the most widely used tool for assessing the world’s leading journals. The metrics it offers, including Journal Impact Factor, empower users to objectively evaluate a journal’s performance and its influence on research globally."  JCR ranks 9100 journals from 2200 publishers in 78 countries.

Source:  Knowledgespeak Newsletter, June 18, 2010