NASA apps: global planet changes, NASA content and television

Featured NASA Apps

NASA Spinoff

NASA Spinoff App
NASA Spinoff profiles the best examples of technology that have been transferred from NASA research and missions into commercial products. From life-saving satellite systems to hospital robots that care for patients and more, NASA technologies benefit society. There’s more space in your life than you think!
› Get the iPad App →
Related: › Technology Innovation iPad App →

 

Images of Change

 

Earth as Art

 

Human activities, a changing climate and natural disasters are rapidly altering the face of our planet. Now, with NASA’s Images of Change iPad application, users can get an interactive before-and-after view of these changes.

 

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› Get the iPad App→

NASA App

NASA App
The NASA App showcases a huge collection of the latest NASA content, including images, videos on-demand, NASA Television, mission information, news & feature stories, latest tweets, ISS sighting opportunities, satellite tracking, Third Rock Radio and much more.

Source: http://www.nasa.gov/connect/apps.html#.VHYWqTHF_To

U.S. Citizens — Free access to online NTIS reports, Oct. 2014

NTIS is launching greater access to federally funded science & technology information and reports. Starting in October 2014, U.S. citizens will have free access to all electronically-available documents in the NTIS collection.

Currently there are more than 850,000 documents digitized for free public access. For the first time, Individuals will have the option to subscribe to the NTRL in order to benefit from the Premium features of the database, such as Digitization-on-Demand (NTRL Premium Individual). Premium Institutional subscribers (including corporations) will continue to have access to the more than 2.8 million records with a variety of enhanced features as listed in the chart below.

More at: http://www.ntis.gov/pdf/NTRNews7-3.pdf

National Technical Information Service (NTIS) connects to the database.

Princeton University Library has a subscription to NTRL reports,

(National Technical Reports Library)  and is a founding member…I think.

DataCite & Data Citation Index (Thomson Reuters)

 Thomson Reuters and DataCite collaborate to expand discovery of research data -29 Aug 2014

The Intellectual Property & Science business of Thomson Reuters has announced a collaboration with DataCite, a global non-profit organization dedicated to enabling people to find, share, use, and cite data. The collaboration will promote the discovery of research data sets through the Data Citation Index, a single-point solution providing access to quality research data sets from multi-disciplinary repositories around the world.

This collaboration will connect the Data Citation Index to high quality research data from repositories worldwide that work with DataCite. This will ensure that the valuable content that has been made citable by DataCite is globally discoverable, properly attributed and reusable by other researchers. As part of the Web of Science – the premier scientific search and discovery platform and industry authority in science, social science, and arts & humanities citation indexes – inclusion within the Data Citation Index will also further DataCite’s mission of increasing acceptance of research data as citable contributions to the scholarly record.

Since creating the Data Citation Index, Thomson Reuters has worked closely with global industry leaders to expand the breadth of research discovery by capturing bibliographic records and cited references for digital research, as well as literature describing research which cites or uses the data, stewarding the accurate identification, attribution and measurement of this growing body of scholarship. The Data Citation Index allows users to gain a comprehensive view of the genesis of research projects and influence the future paths they may take, while minimizing the duplication of work and speeding the scientific research process to keep pace with the changing global research landscape. Through linked content and summary information, this data is displayed within the broader context of the scholarly research ecosystem, enabling users to gain perspective that otherwise would be lost if viewed in isolation.”

Source:  Knowledgespeak Newsletter

ChemSpider (Royal Society of Chemistry)

ChemSpider

  • http://www.chemspider.com/

    “This astonishingly powerful, award-winning database from The Royal Society of Chemistry provides fast access to over 30 million chemical structures and properties, as well as nearly unlimited links and related information. For a quick introduction, go to the About page and watch the ten-minute introductory video. Then start searching! Simple searches expedite your exploration when you enter the trade name, synonym, or systematic name of the compound you wish to find. Conversely, you can input by Structure, with an innovative Edit Molecule function. Lastly, Advanced searches allow you to combine methods. In addition, the ChemSpider blog boasts frequent entries about the site and the field at large. [CNH]

  • Source: The Scout Report — Volume 20, Number 33, from the Univ. of Wisconsin

New Ocean Climate Change Web Portal (NOAA)

The NOAA and NOAA Fisheries are collaborating in a new ocean climate change Web portal in trying to assess the effects of climate change on fish.

What is the Ocean Climate Change Web Portal?

“It’s an online system that provides an easy way to display maps of climate data, such as ocean temperature and salinity, over portions of the globe. For example, it can allow you to view how the temperature in the North Atlantic would change in the 21st century as compared with the 20th century.”

Reported by ResearchBuzz, Tara Calishain, Mar. 5, 2014.

bioRxiv — the Preprint Server for Biology

bioRxiv is in beta.  This is from their “about” page:

bioRxiv (pronounced “bio-archive”) is a free online archive and distribution service for unpublished preprints in the life sciences. It is operated by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, a not-for-profit research and educational institution. By posting preprints on bioRxiv, authors are able to make their findings immediately available to the scientific community and receive feedback on draft manuscripts before they are submitted to journals.

Articles are not peer-reviewed, edited, or typeset before being posted online. However, all articles undergo a basic screening process for offensive and/or non-scientific content. No endorsement of an article’s methods, assumptions, conclusions, or scientific quality by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is implied by its appearance in bioRxiv. An article may be posted prior to, or concurrently with, submission to a journal but should not be posted if it has already been published.

Authors may submit a revised version of an article to bioRxiv at any time and can update the bioRxiv record with a link to a version of an article that has been published in a journal. Once posted on bioRxiv, articles are citable and therefore cannot be removed.”

From an email/ad from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press

Science Matters, newsletter published by the EPA

Science Matters

http://epa.gov/research/sciencematters/

“The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) publishes the “Science Matters” newsletter to inform the general public about its research and advocacy activities on behalf of the American public. The newsletter was first published in 2010, and is a terrific source of information on everything from green chemistry to renewable energy. In the About this Issue area, visitors can learn about the topical focus of each issue. In the Science Features, visitors can read articles such as “Nanomaterials: Harnessing the Potential, Understanding the Risks” and “Partnerships for a Safer Chemical Future.” Users shouldn’t miss the Ask a Scientist feature, which profiles a different EPA scientist in each issue. The In the News area brings together updates about new partnerships with colleges, universities, and international collaborators. [KMG]

Source:  The Scout Report (Univ. of Wisconsin)  — May 3, 2013

ResearchGate – LinkedIn for Scientists

“Most social network founders want to make money. Ijad Madisch, the scientist-CEO behind ResearchGate, has a higher goal: He wants to win a Nobel Prize for the network. 

Five years after its founding, Madisch’s plan doesn’t seem so far-fetched. ResearchGate, which has been described as “LinkedIn for scientists,” has 2.9 million users — about half of the international scientific community. Madisch has built a list of success stories in which scientists used ResearchGate to speed up their work. And as of now, he’s got a formidable supporter you may have heard of: Bill Gates.”

Source: ReadWrite [support=readwriteweb.com@mail320.us3.mcdlv.net]

Full article is here, complete with photo of a freckled Bill Gates:

http://readwrite.com/2013/06/04/bill-gates-researchgate?utm_source=ReadWrite+Newsletters&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=b883d1cdd5-RWWDailyNewsletter&utm_term=0_9fbeb5d667-b883d1cdd5-201299837

Journal of Molecular and Engineering Materials

Free access is offered through 31 December, 2013.  One must register though:

http://www.worldscientific.com/jmem

“Targets” reviews, communications and regular papers.  Intersects the fields of materials and molecular science.  Wants high-impact works in: materials design, synthesis, growth, analysis, characterization, properties and functions, fabrication and device manufacturing, and system integration and applications of materials.

Bassler Wins L’ORÉAL-UNESCO Award in Life Sciences

Bassler Wins L’ORÉAL-UNESCO Award in Life Sciences
National Academy of Sciences member Bonnie L. Bassler has been selected as the 2012 L’ORÉAL-UNESCO Laureate for North America. Bassler was chosen for her work in understanding chemical communication between bacteria and its use in developing anti-bacterial therapies to combat infectious disease.”

 

Source: What’s New @ the National Academies