UK Medical Heritage Library

UK” The UK Medical Heritage Library now available online for free – 10 May 2017

A £1m project to digitise more than 15 million pages of 19th century medical texts has been completed and the material is now available online for free. It has taken three years to convert these historic published works for use in the 21st century by learners, teachers and researchers.

Covering much more than just medical sciences, this enormous library of text and images encompasses consumer health, sport and fitness, diet and nutrition, along with some weird and wonderful historical medical practices such as phrenology and hydrotherapy.

The project was jointly funded by education technology solutions not-for-profit, Jisc, and Wellcome Library, which contributed its entire 19th century collection, along with content from nine partner institutions: Royal College of Physicians of London, Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh, Royal College of Surgeons of England, University College London, University of Leeds, University of Glasgow, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, King’s College London and the University of Bristol. As a collective, this will make a valuable resource for the exploration of medical humanities.

The aim has been to create a comprehensive online resource for the history of medicine and related sciences, which significantly increases the availability of digitised text for teaching, learning and research.

The collection, called the UK Medical Heritage Library, is completely open and can now be accessed for free via Jisc’s Historical Texts resource or via the Wellcome Library’s website.

Brought to you by Scope e-Knowledge Center, a world-leading provider of Abstracting & Indexing (A&I) Services, Knowledge Modeling Services (Taxonomies, Thesauri and Ontologies), Metadata Enrichment & Entity Extraction Services.”

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Source:  Knowledgespeak Newsletter

Scopus has added 5 million pre-1996 articles and over 93 million references

“Scopus has added 5 million pre-1996 articles and over 93 million references – and we’re not even half-way

on Thu, 11/26/2015 – 16:06

As of this week, Scopus has added 5 million pre-1996 records including over 93 million references to the database. This has been done in two ways: by adding pre-1996 cited references to existing articles in Scopus and by adding article back files, including their cited references, coming from archives from various publishers, going back to 1970.

This milestone is the result of the ongoing Scopus Cited Reference Expansion Program initiated in March 2014 that aims to include cited references in Scopus going back to 1970 for pre-1996 content. The goal of this expansion program is to further enhance the ability for Scopus users to perform long-term, extensive bibliometric and historic trend analyses – and to enhance and further complete the h-index for researchers who published pre-1996.

Archives already completed include the following publishers: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). American Physical Society (APS), Karger Publishers, Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC), Springer, American Medical Association (AMA), Inderscience and Elsevier.

Additional archives currently in process include: Wiley Blackwell, BioMedCentral (BMC), Taylor & Francis, Oxford University Press, Society of Automotive Engineers International, (SAE), Walter de Gruyter, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), Institute of Physics (IoP), Brill Publishers, Sage, Emerald Group Publishing, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and the American Geophysical Union (AGU).

We will keep you updated on the progress of this Expansion Program, and make sure to follow this blog or our Twitter account to stay up to date.”

Release Date:
November 26 2015

MEDLINE ANNUAL CHANGES/UPDATES

National Library of Medicine Technical Bulletin

This article collects the notable data changes made to MEDLINE during annual National Library of Medicine (NLM) maintenance known as Year-End Processing (YEP) for 2016:

MEDLINE Data Changes — 2016

Tybaert S. NLM Tech Bull. 2015 Nov-Dec;(407):e8.

2015 December 08 [posted]

Brand new concepts include: Autism Spectrum Disorder, Human Embryonic Stem Cells, Olive Oil, Origin of Life, Open Access Publishing, War-Related Injuries, RNAi Therapeutics, and many more terms.  Medline thesaurus terms are remapped when changes occur, so as to include articles under former headings.

Elsevier’s ScienceDirect dropping access via Internet Explorer 8

Effective January 1, 2016, ScienceDirect will no longer support Internet Explorer 8 (IE8).

“We strongly encourage our customers to follow Microsoft’s directive as well by updating to more recent versions of IE. Additionally, users can move to the latest versions of the Chrome or Firefox browsers for an optimal ScienceDirect experience”

The whys:

  • Remove current IE8 security issues
  • Enhance existing security measures across all browsers
  • Add support for new browser technologies
  • Add responsive design to aid use of ScienceDirect across devices
  • Improve accessibility to better enable access to people with diverse abilities

 

  • If you have any questions or concerns, please visit the ScienceDirect Blog Source:  Email today from Elsevier ScienceDirect <sciencedirect@mail.elsevier.com>

ProQuest full text of scholarly journal content soon indexed by Google Scholar

By Kurt Sanford, CEO

“ProQuest is enabling the full text of its scholarly journal content to be indexed in Google Scholar, improving discovery and research outcomes. Our goal is that by the third quarter of 2015, users starting their research in Google Scholar will be able to access full text via ProQuest.”

http://www.proquest.com/blog/pqblog/2015/Why-ProQuest-is-working-with-Google.html

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Tuesday, 18th August 2015

ProQuest Scholarly Content Now Discoverable in Google Scholar

By Africa S. Hands

From No Shelf Required:

ProQuest has marked another milestone in ease of access to its rich research content. The full text of its scholarly content – including journals and working papers – is now indexed in Google Scholar, enabling Google Scholar users to seamlessly discover and access their library’s ProQuest collections. Efficiency and productivity for both ProQuest and Google Scholar users is improved, while libraries benefit from increased usage for their subscribed collections.

Full story >>

http://www.libraries.wright.edu/noshelfrequired/2015/08/12/proquest-scholarly-content-now-discoverable-in-google-scholar/

Source via: ResourceShelf Newsletter – 8th September 2015

[ResourceShelf] Newsletter 643

NSF Special Report: Understanding the Brain

  • http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/brain/“In 2013, President Obama unveiled “The Brain Initiative,” a ten-year, nearly one billion dollar effort to unlock the mysteries of the brain. With contributions by everyone from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to the National Science Foundation (NSF) to Google, the initiative focuses on diverse fields and research methodologies. Readers will find much to explore on this accompanying website from NSF, including several dozen beautifully produced videos designed for classroom use. The videos, most of which are about five-minutes in length, cover topics such as the thinking brain, the perceiving brain, brain states and consciousness, the evolving brain, the emotional brain, the effects of musical training on the brain, and interviews with a number of groundbreaking brain researchers. Additionally, readers may peruse information about the brain initiative on the site, including Funding, Events, Resources, and News related to the project.”[CNH]
  • Source:  Scout Report, Univ. of Wisc., 7/17/2015, Vol. 21 (27)

New York Panel on Climate Change 2015

  • http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/nyas.2015.1336.issue-1/issuetoc“With the bulk of scientific articles and reports placed behind a paywall, it’s always a welcome gift when good research is made available for free. This report on the New York Panel on Climate Change 2015 is loaded with excellent information – and it’s free and available to anyone with an Internet connection. As the introduction to the report notes, “The climate of the New York City metropolitan region is changing – annual temperatures are hotter, heavy downpours are increasingly frequent, and the sea is rising.” The rest of the report includes a knowledgeable forward by Mayor Bill de Blasio, an executive summary on the findings of the panel, an article outlining the panel’s climate observations and projections, and chapters on sea level rise, coastal storms, coastal flooding, public health impacts, and conclusions and recommendations. For inspired readers, there are also appendices to the report that feature infographics and technical details.” [CNH]
  • Source:  Scout Report, Univ. Wisc., July 17, 2015   (Vol. 21 no. 27)

Addressing our Greatest Engineering Challenges

From today’s WhatsNew@National-Academies.org:

Engineering Schools throughout the U.S. are committing to educate certain numbers of engineers with special interests and talents in helping to solve our greatest challenges.

“In a letter of commitment presented to President Obama today, more than 120 U.S. engineering schools announced plans to educate a new generation of engineers expressly equipped to tackle some of the most pressing issues facing society in the 21st century. Read More

Princeton University’s Prof. Robert Socolow is a member of this Committee on Grand Challenges.

There is also a 6-min video at http://engineeringchallenges.org/

Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering and Environment

From Genetic Engineering &  Biotechnology News, Best of the Web, Feb. 15, 2015

http://www.genengnews.com/best-of-the-web/gendered-innovations/2935/

URL:genderedinnovations.stanford.edu  The purpose is to get away from using the male as the default, to help us be more mindful of the significant differences in male and female in research.

Table of Contents Alerts to > 25,000 Scholarly Journals

  • http://www.journaltocs.hw.ac.uk/

    “Current Awareness Services have been published by libraries for a long time. They usually include new books, table of contents alerts, blogs, citation alerts, and other information. JournalTOCs builds on the idea by offering tables of contents (TOCs) for the newest issues of thousands of academic journals via this free website. Readers may type in the name of any journal in the search function on the homepage to access that journal’s latest table of contents. They may also browse by publishers and subjects. For librarians, students, and scholars who want to keep up to date on the breaking research in their field, this is a valuable resource. [CNH]

  • Main Publishers
  • Source:  The Scout Report, Vol. 21(4), University of Wisconsin, Jan. 30, 2015