DataCite & Data Citation Index (Thomson Reuters)

 Thomson Reuters and DataCite collaborate to expand discovery of research data -29 Aug 2014

The Intellectual Property & Science business of Thomson Reuters has announced a collaboration with DataCite, a global non-profit organization dedicated to enabling people to find, share, use, and cite data. The collaboration will promote the discovery of research data sets through the Data Citation Index, a single-point solution providing access to quality research data sets from multi-disciplinary repositories around the world.

This collaboration will connect the Data Citation Index to high quality research data from repositories worldwide that work with DataCite. This will ensure that the valuable content that has been made citable by DataCite is globally discoverable, properly attributed and reusable by other researchers. As part of the Web of Science – the premier scientific search and discovery platform and industry authority in science, social science, and arts & humanities citation indexes – inclusion within the Data Citation Index will also further DataCite’s mission of increasing acceptance of research data as citable contributions to the scholarly record.

Since creating the Data Citation Index, Thomson Reuters has worked closely with global industry leaders to expand the breadth of research discovery by capturing bibliographic records and cited references for digital research, as well as literature describing research which cites or uses the data, stewarding the accurate identification, attribution and measurement of this growing body of scholarship. The Data Citation Index allows users to gain a comprehensive view of the genesis of research projects and influence the future paths they may take, while minimizing the duplication of work and speeding the scientific research process to keep pace with the changing global research landscape. Through linked content and summary information, this data is displayed within the broader context of the scholarly research ecosystem, enabling users to gain perspective that otherwise would be lost if viewed in isolation.”

Source:  Knowledgespeak Newsletter

ChemSpider (Royal Society of Chemistry)

ChemSpider

  • http://www.chemspider.com/

    “This astonishingly powerful, award-winning database from The Royal Society of Chemistry provides fast access to over 30 million chemical structures and properties, as well as nearly unlimited links and related information. For a quick introduction, go to the About page and watch the ten-minute introductory video. Then start searching! Simple searches expedite your exploration when you enter the trade name, synonym, or systematic name of the compound you wish to find. Conversely, you can input by Structure, with an innovative Edit Molecule function. Lastly, Advanced searches allow you to combine methods. In addition, the ChemSpider blog boasts frequent entries about the site and the field at large. [CNH]

  • Source: The Scout Report — Volume 20, Number 33, from the Univ. of Wisconsin

bioRxiv (beta) Biology Preprint Server

bioRxiv beta The Preprint Server for Biology graphic

A not-for-profit bioscience information service,
from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Watch the video here

  • Submit a paper and within 24 hours anyone can read and cite it, without waiting months until it’s reviewed
  • Free for authors, free for readers
  • Share your paper with other scientists without having to wait months before it’s reviewed
  • Get feedback on your paper before submitting it to a journal
    (more and more journals accept submissions that have appeared onbioRxiv)

bioRxiv contains hundreds of papers that present new, confirmatory, or contradictory findings

Biochemistry
Bioengineering
Bioinformatics
Biophysics
Cancer Biology
Cell Biology
Developmental Biology
Ecology
Evolutionary Biology
Genetics
Genomics
Immunology
Microbiology
Molecular Biology
Molecular Medicine
Neuroscience
Paleontology
Pathology
Pharmacology
Physiology
Plant Biology
Scientific
Communication
Synthetic Biology
Systems Biology
Zoology

More details, including submission instructions, at
bioRxiv.org

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory graphic

Frontiers in Earth Science & Frontiers in Environmental Science

Switzerland Frontiers launches new open-access journals – Frontiers in Earth Science and Frontiers in Environmental Science – 06 Nov 2013

“Open-access publisher Frontiers, part of the Nature Publishing Group family, has announced the launch of two new open-access journals – Frontiers in Earth Science and Frontiers in Environmental Science.

Manuscripts submitted to specialty sections in “Frontiers in” journals are peer reviewed by specialty associate and review editors. Specialty Chief Editors oversee subject areas across the ‘Frontiers in’ journals.

The initial specialty sections open for submissions to Frontiers in Earth Science are: Atmospheric Science, Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism, Hydrosphere, Interdisciplinary Climate Studies, Paleontology, Structural Geology and Tectonics, Quaternary Science, Geomorphology and Paleoenvironment and Structural Geology and Tectonics. Further specialty sections will be added soon.

Initially, Frontiers in Environmental Science will offer specialty sections in: Agroecology and Land Use Systems, Air Pollution, Atmospheric Science, Environmental Informatics, Environmental Toxicology, Green and Environmental Chemistry, Groundwater Resources and Management, Interdisciplinary Climate Studies, Microbiotechnology, Ecotoxicology and Bioremediation, Soil Processes, and Wastewater Management.

Frontiers publishes all articles under a Creative Commons Attribution license (CC-BY), which allows users to share, copy and distribute a work, while at the same time crediting the authors of the article.”

Click hereSource:  Knowledgespeak Newsletter

New Ocean Climate Change Web Portal (NOAA)

The NOAA and NOAA Fisheries are collaborating in a new ocean climate change Web portal in trying to assess the effects of climate change on fish.

What is the Ocean Climate Change Web Portal?

“It’s an online system that provides an easy way to display maps of climate data, such as ocean temperature and salinity, over portions of the globe. For example, it can allow you to view how the temperature in the North Atlantic would change in the 21st century as compared with the 20th century.”

Reported by ResearchBuzz, Tara Calishain, Mar. 5, 2014.

Climate Change, new publication from NAS & Royal Society

NAS, Royal Society Release Publication on Climate Change 

“The U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the Royal Society, the national science academy of the U.K., released a new joint publication that explains the clear evidence that humans are causing the climate to change, and that addresses a variety of other key questions commonly asked about climate change science. “ClimatechangeNAS

From What’s New @ the National Academies, Feb.,27, 2014

ResearchGate – LinkedIn for Scientists

“Most social network founders want to make money. Ijad Madisch, the scientist-CEO behind ResearchGate, has a higher goal: He wants to win a Nobel Prize for the network. 

Five years after its founding, Madisch’s plan doesn’t seem so far-fetched. ResearchGate, which has been described as “LinkedIn for scientists,” has 2.9 million users — about half of the international scientific community. Madisch has built a list of success stories in which scientists used ResearchGate to speed up their work. And as of now, he’s got a formidable supporter you may have heard of: Bill Gates.”

Source: ReadWrite [support=readwriteweb.com@mail320.us3.mcdlv.net]

Full article is here, complete with photo of a freckled Bill Gates:

http://readwrite.com/2013/06/04/bill-gates-researchgate?utm_source=ReadWrite+Newsletters&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=b883d1cdd5-RWWDailyNewsletter&utm_term=0_9fbeb5d667-b883d1cdd5-201299837

eLife — Open Access journal for important research in Life Sciences and Biomedicine

 “Website for new open-access journal, eLife, launched – 17 Dec 2012

eLife, a new open-access journal for outstanding advances in life science and biomedicine, reveals a fresh approach to presenting and using scientific content on its new website.”

“The eLife journal invites visitors to explore important new research and associated data, read comments and commentary by experts and colleagues, and get a sense of the quality of work that eLife is publishing. Nineteen research papers have now been selected for publication by eLife’s academic editors.

The new site also offers a chance to explore how eLife is taking advantage of digital media. Presentation of content is clean and distraction-free, allowing authors to present the results of their research in full, and inviting readers to delve deeply into the work by exploring figures and their supplements, watching videos, reading editor decision letters and author responses, downloading data sets, viewing article-level metrics, and more. All of this is a starting point, as eLife will continue to solicit feedback from the community in making the presentation as accessible and usable as possible.

The eLife journal is now online at http://elife.elifesciences.org.”

Click here

Source: Knowledgespeak Newsletter, Dec. 17, 2012

PANGAEA (Geoscience & Environmental Data) linked with Elsevier’s Science Direct

Netherland Elsevier and PANGAEA announce next step in connecting research articles to data - 30 Jul 2010

“STM publisher Elsevier, Netherlands, and PANGAEA – Publishing Network for Geoscientific & Environmental Data – have announced their next step in interconnecting the diverse elements of scientific research. Elsevier articles at ScienceDirect are now enriched with graphical information linking to associated research data sets that are deposited at PANGAEA.

PANGAEA is a data library which links primary data related to articles in earth and environmental science journals and thus may serve some hundred journals of the Elsevier portfolio. In the first phase, more than 1,000 articles from various earth science journals were linked. The data are freely available from the publication’s page in ScienceDirect, without a login or subscription.

The latest initiative follows the introduction, last February, of ‘reciprocal linking’ – automatically linking research data sets deposited at PANGAEA to corresponding articles in Elsevier journals on its electronic platform ScienceDirect and vice versa. The new feature adds a map to every ScienceDirect article that has associated research data at PANGAEA. It displays all geographical locations for which such data is available. A single click then brings the user from the ScienceDirect article to the research data set at PANGAEA.”

Source: Knowledgespeak Newsletter

Open Access Repositories joined by the UK’s JISC

UK JISC becomes founding member of the Confederation of Open Access Repositories26 Oct 2009

"The UK’s Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) has become a founding member of the Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR). COAR is an international not-for-profit association that aims to promote greater visibility and application of research outputs through global networks of Open Access (OA) digital repositories.

Inspired from the European DRIVER repositories project, which helps to enhance repository development, COAR takes this vision to an international scale. Founding members of the Confederation include members from North America, China, Japan and Europe. Joining COAR at the early stage of its development means members will be able to contribute to shaping the organisation’s objectives which will look at interoperability, raising awareness and promoting OA repositories, supporting the repository community and working with partners in closely related fields such as research management and publishing.

Open Access repositories seek to offer researchers and universities the chance to significantly increase the impact of their research outputs, with the potential for significant benefits for UK higher education and the economy and society more widely. The aim of COAR is to enhance and progress the provision, visibility and application of research outputs through global networks of Open Access repositories."
 

Source:  Knowledgespeak Newsletter, Oct. 26, 2009