Addressing our Greatest Engineering Challenges

From today’s WhatsNew@National-Academies.org:

Engineering Schools throughout the U.S. are committing to educate certain numbers of engineers with special interests and talents in helping to solve our greatest challenges.

“In a letter of commitment presented to President Obama today, more than 120 U.S. engineering schools announced plans to educate a new generation of engineers expressly equipped to tackle some of the most pressing issues facing society in the 21st century. Read More

Princeton University’s Prof. Robert Socolow is a member of this Committee on Grand Challenges.

There is also a 6-min video at http://engineeringchallenges.org/

Climate change myths — addressed by John Cook, Climate Communication Fellow, Australia

Skeptical Science: Getting skeptical about global warming skepticism

  • http://www.skepticalscience.com

    “This website gets serious about addressing climate change skepticism. Using only peer-reviewed research, John Cook, the Climate Communication Fellow at the University of Queensland, Australia, takes the time to seriously consider the doubts that people might have about the state of the earth’s climate. Readers might like to start with the sidebar that addresses the ten most common climate myths, including the idea that the climate has changed before, that warming is due to the sun, that climate change isn’t bad, that there is no scientific consensus, that the earth is actually cooling, and five others. The site also offers a variety of interesting tabs to explore, including an excellent Resources page. [CNH]

  • Source:  The Scout Report, University of Wisconsin, Vol. 21(7), Feb. 20th

PEI Currents — Princeton Environmental Institute newsletter

The Spring 2015 issue is now available here:

http://us3.campaign-archive2.com/?u=80f0f238867161406feab010b&id=7b4802df07&e=b33

Prof. Francois Morel has returned as the Director of the Princeton Environmental Institute, and Prof. Kelly Caylor has become the Director of the Program in Environmental Studies.

 

 

Climate Intervention Technologies: CO2 and Albedo

WorldinHands

Source:  WhatsNew@National-Academies.org, Feb.13, 2015

Climate Intervention: Carbon Dioxide Removal and Albedo Modification“A new two-volume report from the National Research Council says proposed climate intervention technologies are not ready for wide-scale deployment and reducing emissions is still the most effective way to combat climate change.”

Virus Evolution — New OA journal from OUP

The Virus Evolution      http://ve.oxfordjournals.org/

“Virus Evolution is a new Open Access journal focusing on the long-term evolution of viruses, viruses as a model system for studying evolutionary processes, viral molecular epidemiology and environmental virology.

The aim of the journal is to provide a forum for original research papers, reviews, commentaries and a venue for in-depth discussion on the topics relevant to virus evolution.”

“Editors-in Chief, Professor Oliver Pybus, University of Oxford, and Professor Santiago Elena, Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas (CSIC-UPV) welcome submissions at:https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/vevolu.
Source of information:  Knowledgespeak Newsletter, Feb. 9, 2015

Symbols in physics & astronomy — videos

URL:www.sixtysymbols.com

Source:  GEN:  Best of the Web Jan 15, 2015 (Vol. 35, No. 2) Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News   Mouse over symbol to see 5 or 10 min. video explanations.

Created by the University of Nottingham.

 

NBC LEARN: a free resource — for most all ages

“Our Mission:  NBC Learn believes in the power of great stories — historic news reports, original video content, and current events coverage — to engage, inspire and educate K-12 and Higher Ed students.”  Among the free resources there are those that deal with the science of sports,  chemistry, and environmental issues.

Featured this month is: “Finishing the Dream”  — Martin Luther King Jr’s “Dream”

 

Table of Contents Alerts to > 25,000 Scholarly Journals

  • http://www.journaltocs.hw.ac.uk/

    “Current Awareness Services have been published by libraries for a long time. They usually include new books, table of contents alerts, blogs, citation alerts, and other information. JournalTOCs builds on the idea by offering tables of contents (TOCs) for the newest issues of thousands of academic journals via this free website. Readers may type in the name of any journal in the search function on the homepage to access that journal’s latest table of contents. They may also browse by publishers and subjects. For librarians, students, and scholars who want to keep up to date on the breaking research in their field, this is a valuable resource. [CNH]

  • Main Publishers
  • Source:  The Scout Report, Vol. 21(4), University of Wisconsin, Jan. 30, 2015

PNAS is 100 Years Old

Click here to see articles featured in the most recent editions of PNAS.

Visit the PNAS 100th Anniversary Portal for commentaries, perspectives, special features and more celebrating the journal’s 100 years of service to science and society.

Sign up for free PNAS Front Matter Alerts to receive emails when the latest Opinions, News Features, Core Concepts, Inner Workings, and Science and Culture articles are published.

Stay updated on the latest PNAS content with full-text apps and the PNAS mobile site. Please visit our mobile page for more information.”

From today @

Publications of the National Academy of Sciences

History of Vaccines website from College of Physicians, Philadelphia

Status

“Vaccinations have had a profound impact on human health, and yet there remains a lot of misinformation floating around out there regarding vaccines. (No, no, no, they do not cause autism.) The History of Vaccines website by the College of Physicians of Philadelphia is an excellent educational resource that covers many different aspects of vaccines and their history, including information about the science of vaccines, vaccine-preventable diseases, misconceptions about vaccines, and answers to the question, “why vaccinate?” Beyond articles addressing each of these (and many other) topics, the website includes a number of interactive features such as timelines, animations, and activities for students. Activities include, among others, a game in which players try to develop vaccines to protect a population of a society fighting disease, as well as a game that has players apply the scientific method to epidemiological scenarios.”


4-star website according to “Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News”

Jan 15, 2015 (Vol. 35, No. 2)

http://www.genengnews.com/best-of-the-web/the-history-of-vaccines/2926/