bioRxiv (beta) Biology Preprint Server

bioRxiv beta The Preprint Server for Biology graphic

A not-for-profit bioscience information service,
from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Watch the video here

  • Submit a paper and within 24 hours anyone can read and cite it, without waiting months until it’s reviewed
  • Free for authors, free for readers
  • Share your paper with other scientists without having to wait months before it’s reviewed
  • Get feedback on your paper before submitting it to a journal
    (more and more journals accept submissions that have appeared onbioRxiv)

bioRxiv contains hundreds of papers that present new, confirmatory, or contradictory findings

Biochemistry
Bioengineering
Bioinformatics
Biophysics
Cancer Biology
Cell Biology
Developmental Biology
Ecology
Evolutionary Biology
Genetics
Genomics
Immunology
Microbiology
Molecular Biology
Molecular Medicine
Neuroscience
Paleontology
Pathology
Pharmacology
Physiology
Plant Biology
Scientific
Communication
Synthetic Biology
Systems Biology
Zoology

More details, including submission instructions, at
bioRxiv.org

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory graphic

Finding NCDC Climate Data and Resources

NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration presented an online webinar on Feb. 26, 2014.  From their description:

  • Duration: 40 minutes
  • Speakers:
    • Greg Hammer , Meteorologist, NCDC
    • Scott Stephens, Meteorologist, NCDC
    • Stuart Hinson, Meteorologist, NCDC
    • Mara Sprain, MALS Librarian, NCDC
    • Susan Osborne, Technical Writer and Communications Specialist, NCDC

“Summary: NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) maintains the world’s largest climate data archive and provides climatological services and data to every sector of the United States economy and to users worldwide. Records in the archive range from paleoclimatic data, to centuries-old journals, to data less than an hour old. The Center’s mission is to preserve these data and make them available to the public, business, industry, government, and researchers.

Data come to NCDC from not only land-based stations but also from ships, buoys, weather balloons, radars, satellites, and even sophisticated weather and climate models. With these data, NCDC develops national and global datasets. The datasets are used to maximize the use of our climatic and natural resources while also minimizing the risks caused by climate variability and weather extremes. NCDC has a statutory mission to describe the climate of the United States, and it acts as the “Nation’s Scorekeeper” regarding the trends and anomalies of weather and climate. NCDC’s climate data have been used in a variety of applications including agriculture, air quality, construction, education, energy, engineering, forestry, health, insurance, landscape design, livestock management, manufacturing, national security, recreation and tourism, retailing, transportation, and water resources management.”

“Participation is free, however registration is required. Upon registering, an e-mail confirmation of registration will include instructions for joining the Webinar. …Parts 2 and 3 of the webinar series will be presented in the spring of 2014. More information will come out on those individual webinars later.”

The NCDC webinar is directly at: http://login.icohere.com/connect/d_connect_itemframer.cfm?vsDTTitle=NCDC%20%2D%20The%20World%3Fs%20Largest%20Climate%20Data%20Archive&dseq=18332&dtseq=84935&emdisc=2&mkey=public1172&vbDTA=0&viNA=0&vsDTA=&PAN=2&bDTC=0&blog=0&vsSH=A

Government webinars are listed here: http://login.icohere.com/public/topics.cfm?cseq=1172.

 

New Ocean Climate Change Web Portal (NOAA)

The NOAA and NOAA Fisheries are collaborating in a new ocean climate change Web portal in trying to assess the effects of climate change on fish.

What is the Ocean Climate Change Web Portal?

“It’s an online system that provides an easy way to display maps of climate data, such as ocean temperature and salinity, over portions of the globe. For example, it can allow you to view how the temperature in the North Atlantic would change in the 21st century as compared with the 20th century.”

Reported by ResearchBuzz, Tara Calishain, Mar. 5, 2014.

ResearchGate – LinkedIn for Scientists

“Most social network founders want to make money. Ijad Madisch, the scientist-CEO behind ResearchGate, has a higher goal: He wants to win a Nobel Prize for the network. 

Five years after its founding, Madisch’s plan doesn’t seem so far-fetched. ResearchGate, which has been described as “LinkedIn for scientists,” has 2.9 million users — about half of the international scientific community. Madisch has built a list of success stories in which scientists used ResearchGate to speed up their work. And as of now, he’s got a formidable supporter you may have heard of: Bill Gates.”

Source: ReadWrite [support=readwriteweb.com@mail320.us3.mcdlv.net]

Full article is here, complete with photo of a freckled Bill Gates:

http://readwrite.com/2013/06/04/bill-gates-researchgate?utm_source=ReadWrite+Newsletters&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=b883d1cdd5-RWWDailyNewsletter&utm_term=0_9fbeb5d667-b883d1cdd5-201299837

International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) & ORCID IDs

ORCID spells out structure of 16-digit identifier

ORCID, an international, interdisciplinary, open and not-for-profit organisation, recently revealed information on what an ORCID identifier looks like.

The ORCID ID is a 16-digit number that is compatible with the ISO Standard (ISO 27729), also known as the International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI). Initially, ORCID IDs will be randomly assigned by the ORCID Registry from a block of numbers that will not conflict with ISNI-formatted numbers assigned in other ways. ORCID IDs always need all 16-digits – they cannot be shortened to remove leading zeros if they exist.

Only the ORCID Registry will assign ORCID IDs, either through the ORCID website, or the related APIs. ORCID IDs are intended to be assigned to individuals, and may be secured at no charge. The IDs will be assigned randomly from a block of numbers reserved for this purpose. (Initially IDs will be assigned between 0000-0001-5000-0000 and 0000-0003-5000-000X).

ORCID IDs will be expressed as an HTTP URI. The number will be proceeded by ‘http://orcid.org/‘. A hyphen will be inserted every 4 digits to aid readability, though if the hyphens are removed, the number still refers to the same ORCID ID.”

Source:  Knowledgespeak Newsletter 8/9/12

Need help with a data management plan? Try DMPTool

dmp_tool_banner_verbose

Many U.S. funding agencies are now requiring researchers to submit a data management plan with their grant applications. DMPTool* provides guidance in creating ready to use data management plans for:

NIH, NEH, NOAA, NSF, Gordan and Betty Moore, IMLS

The tool has been customized for Princeton users.  Log in with your Princeton NetID for additional Princeton specific help links and suggested text for researchers who will be using the DataSpace repository. Simply select Princeton University and log in with your Princeton netID and password.

Want to learn more?

View a brief video demonstration of the tool at https://dmp.cdlib.org/help/video_demo

Attend the Lunch ‘n Learn session on April 24th at Noon in the Frist Multipurpose Room. http://www.princeton.edu/etc/seminars

For more general information about the data management plans visit:
http://libguides.princeton.edu/nsf-dmp

*DMPTool was developed by DataONE, Digital Curation Centre (UK), Smithsonian Institution, UC Curation Center, California Digital Library, UCLA Library, UC San Diego Libraries, University of Illinois, and University of Virginia Libraries.

Virtual Drug Discovery — Nimbus

Editor’s Corner of Fierce BioTech IT .com 5/16/11

My visit to Nimbus, Bill Gates’ bet on virtual drug discovery

By Ryan McBride

Comment | Forward | Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn

The nerve center of Nimbus Discovery, a largely virtual biotech start-up, resides in the offices of Atlas Venture in Cambridge, MA. Bruce Booth, an Atlas partner and chairman of the small company, recently to talked to me at the firm’s offices about how Nimbus is making use of computer-aided drug discovery software from Schrödinger to advance a pipeline of potential treatments for cancer, obesity other conditions.

Microsoft ($MSFT) chairman Bill Gates was announced as one of Nimbus’ seed investors in March, raising the profile of the young firm and shedding light on its unique relationship with Schrödinger, in which Gates invested last year through his Cascade Investment group. Nimbus hasn’t disclosed how much it has brought from Gates, Atlas and its other seed investors, yet more details could be in the offing; the company is planning a Series A round of funding in the near future.

Schrödinger, a global provider of chemistry simulation software for pharmaceutical companies, is a major shareholder in Nimbus. Ramy Farid, Schrödinger’s president, co-founded Nimbus with Atlas’ Booth in 2009 and sits on its board, the chairman says. The start-up has special access to Schrödinger’s software, support from the 21-year-old company’s computational chemistry experts and business expertise from Atlas.

While it’s too early to say with Nimbus’ drugs will succeed in clinical trials, the upstart has been able to show how the use of new software for understanding disease proteins and other tools have helped speed its drug discovery efforts, according to Booth. Read the full article >>

PubMed bibliographic records are enhanced by Images from NCBI

“The PubMed Abstract display for PubMed Central® articles will be enhanced to include an image strip generated from the soon-to-be-released National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Images database.”  To see an example, click on the linked article below:

 

Canese K. PubMed® Display Enhanced with Images from the New NCBI Images Database. NLM Tech Bull. 2010 Sep-Oct;(376):e14.