PBS: Crash Course Astronomy Videos

PBS: Crash Course Astronomy Videos  
www.pbs.org/show/crash-course-astronomy/episodes
“Crash Course Astronomy is a 46-episode PBS series that educates the public about all things astronomy. Each episode is approximately ten minutes in length and covers topics ranging from Moon Phases to Black Holes to Gamma Ray Bursts. Written and hosted by astronomer and blogger Phil Plait, Crash Course Astronomy features clear, accessible explanations of astronomical phenomena accompanied by engaging (and helpful) images, videos, and animations. Episodes can be enjoyed individually – although many reference previous episodes, which may inspire viewers to explore the series chronologically. Crash Course Astronomy is a great resource to include in any science classroom, and may broadly appeal to anyone looking to make sense of astronomy-related news stories, whether they cover exoplanets or eclipses. [MMB] ” The Scout Report Dec. 9, 2016.astronomy-videos

New Weather Satellite: post on Dan’s Wild Wild Science Journal

New Era In Meteorology is Days Away

by Dan Satterfield

This Saturday evening, NASA will launch the GOES-R weather satellite, and a new 21st century era in weather and climate prediction will begin. This will be the equivalent of going from an old black and white TV, to an HD flat screen in color, and if all goes well it will revolutionize forecasting. I […]

Read more of this post

Dan Satterfield | November 15, 2016 at 3:18 am | URL: http://wp.me/s1t6W8-43555

 

Earth Primer (fun) and Map of Life (for citizen science)

Best Apps for Teaching & Learning 2016 | American Association of School Librarians (AASL)
Earth Primer by Chaim Gingold

Level: Elementary and Middle School
Platform: iOS money icon

Website external link icon

Earth Primer is a cross between an intro to earth science textbook and an interactive sandbox game. This creative application allows students to play with the powerful concepts that make up the physical aspects of our planet. Manipulate glaciers, volcanoes, biomes, weather systems, and more and experience how all of these structures combine to affect the makeup of our awesome planet.

Tip: Use Earth Primer to reinforce content in an earth science class.

app icon

Map of Life by Map of Life

Level: Middle School, High School
Platform: iOS | Android

Website external link icon

Map of Life is a field guide applicable to anywhere in the world. Search species by category and/or location, and contribute to the map by recording your sightings in your location. Several categories of species are represented, such as trees, mammals, birds, fish, amphibians, and reptiles. Choose a type of species and view images, read about characteristics and habitat, and view a map showing range. Helps with conservation efforts worldwide!

Tip: Great application for classes using GIS data. Use Map of Life on science field trips to report wildlife and to identify plants and animals.

 

National Geographic enables free 8×11 printing of USGS topos

Here are some useful USGS map tips from Emily Wild, Hydrologist/Librarian at the USGS:

This may be of interest if you and(or) your library users are looking for an easy-to-use tool to search, download, and easily print (by using 8×11 printer) for topographic maps published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

– Examples of recent USGS Denver Library inquiries and instruction of USGS topographic maps include, but not limited to: outdoor recreation, emergency management, disaster planning, search and rescue, bureau of investigations searches and(or) instruction, military, educational outreach, citizen science, and so on.
– Go to the “FREE!! Printable USGS PDF Quads” web site available from National Geographic:

http://www.natgeomaps.com/trail-maps/pdf-quads

– Search selected area

– Click on thumbnail image of the USGS topographic map to open pdf

– Download and(or) print the pages,

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Just some quick reminders about features available for using USGS Topographic Maps:

– USGS Topographic Maps can be uploaded into Google Earth by using this USGS National Geologic Map Data Base (NGMDB) access point to search, download, and import the KMZ files : http://ngmdb.usgs.gov/maps/TopoView/

– The geopdf versions of USGS Topographic Maps can be annotated, measured, etc when users download the free TerraGo Toolbar : http://info.terragotech.com/download/terrago-toolbar

– Library users mention that the transparency feature and snapshot of all USGS topographic maps through time for a point on Earth are useful features in the USGS-ESRI’s “USGS Historical Topographic Map Explorer”

http://historicalmaps.arcgis.com/usgs/

– the how-to is available online through GPO at : http://www.fdlp.gov/all-newsletters/community-insights/2045-tricks-and-tips-for-finding-and-using-usgs-topographic-maps

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And as an aside, many library users still find this map source useful for historical research of the United States :

Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States

http://dsl.richmond.edu/historicalatlas

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Enjoy the day/weekend,

Emily

Disclaimer: the use of trade, product, or firm names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

Emily C. Wild

Librarian (Physical Scientist)
U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Library
Denver Federal Center
ph: (303) 236-1003
ecwild@usgs.gov

USGS Libraries: http://library.usgs.gov

Training: http://go.usa.gov/cBfmG

Profile: https://profile.usgs.gov/ecwild

Chemists to get their own preprint server

World’s largest scientific society plans to introduce ChemRxiv for a traditionally reluctant discipline.

  • Daniel Cressey

11 August 2016

Nature DOI: doi:10.1038/nature.2016.20409

http://www.nature.com./news/chemists-to-get-their-own-preprint-server-1.20409

From Bob Buntrock (Princeton Class of ??)   on the CHMINF Listserv.

Like arXiv and bioRxiv, ChemRxiv, hopes to facilitate the discovery and sharing of significant happenings in Chemistry.  ACS is welcoming input during this planning stage.

PubMed is 20 Years Old

PubMed Celebrates its 20th Anniversary! | NLM in Focus

PubMed logo next to lit birthday candles in the shape of the number twentyPubMed was first released two decades ago in January 1996 as an experimental database under the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) retrieval system. The word “experimental” was dropped from the website in April 1997, and on June 26, 1997, a Capitol Hill press conference officially announced free MEDLINE access via PubMed.More information, a brief history can be found here:

https://infocus.nlm.nih.gov/2016/06/30/pubmed-celebrates-its-20th-anniversary

PubMed Celebrates its 20th Anniversary! | NLM in Focus

“PubMed hit the milestone of 26 million citations; over one million citations are added every year.”

 

 

Viral Zone Best of the Web, Genetic Engng & Biotech News

BestWeb_ViralZoneSource: | Best of the Web | GEN ViralZone |

Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News//

Jun 15, 2016 (Vol. 36, No. 12)

“Do you know your DNA viruses from your RNA viruses, and can you spot a retrotranscribing virus when you see one? If not, the ViralZone from the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics is a fantastic web resource for virologists and other scientists who use viral tools in their research. ViralZone includes description pages for over 500 viruses, and site visitors can access these pages either by a targeted search for a specific virus or by browsing the virus pages by a virus’ Baltimore classification, host, or virion. The website also includes a great deal of general information about viral molecular biology, including topics such as virus entry/exit, replication, and genome evolution. On the homepage, site visitors will find a news section (including a weekly podcast) so that they can keep up to date on the latest viral happenings.”

 

 

Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

Source:  The Scout Report — Volume 22, Number 16

scout@scout.wisc.edu

 
climate.nas= a.gov/climate_resource_center/interactives
“NASA’ s Global Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet website features a diverse set of resources related to the measurement, analysis, and dangers of global climate change. Here readers will find a collection of Interactive Features all designed to bring to life the sometimes abstract conclusions of scientific articles on climate and its effects on human and other life on Earth. For example, the Climate Time Machine allows readers to go backward and forward through four different key climate indicators, including Sea Ice, Sea Level, Carbon Dioxide, and Global Temperature. Perfect for educators who are looking for impactful visual representations of the rising temperatures on the planet, the interactive makes these measurements visceral in a way that charts and graphs are seldom able to do. Other interactives on the page include the Global Ice Viewer, Quizzes, The Sun: A Virtual Tour, The Water Cycle, and others. [CNH]”

Data USA — Visualization of free public data — MIT

Website makes government data easier to find

Steve Lohr writes: “For years, the federal government, states, and some cities have enthusiastically made vast troves of data open to the public. A project coming out of the MIT Media Lab seeks to harness that data and make it available to a wider audience. The project, called Data USA, bills itself as ‘the most comprehensive visualization of US public data.’ It is free, and its software code is open source, meaning that developers can build custom applications by adding other data.”…

New York Times, Apr. 4DATA USA

Climate Change and Extreme Events

Attributing Extreme Events to Climate Change

It is now possible to estimate the influence of climate change on some types of extreme events, such as heat waves, drought, and heavy precipitation, says a new Academies report.

From What’s New at the National Academies, March 11, 2016