bioRxiv — the Preprint Server for Biology

bioRxiv is in beta.  This is from their “about” page:

bioRxiv (pronounced “bio-archive”) is a free online archive and distribution service for unpublished preprints in the life sciences. It is operated by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, a not-for-profit research and educational institution. By posting preprints on bioRxiv, authors are able to make their findings immediately available to the scientific community and receive feedback on draft manuscripts before they are submitted to journals.

Articles are not peer-reviewed, edited, or typeset before being posted online. However, all articles undergo a basic screening process for offensive and/or non-scientific content. No endorsement of an article’s methods, assumptions, conclusions, or scientific quality by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is implied by its appearance in bioRxiv. An article may be posted prior to, or concurrently with, submission to a journal but should not be posted if it has already been published.

Authors may submit a revised version of an article to bioRxiv at any time and can update the bioRxiv record with a link to a version of an article that has been published in a journal. Once posted on bioRxiv, articles are citable and therefore cannot be removed.”

From an email/ad from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press

Microbe World

URL:www.microbeworld.org
  • Lots of information over a variety of topics
    • Poor site organization—two separate navigational toolbars
    • Source: GEN “Best of the Web”, Sep 15, 2013 (Vol. 33, No. 16)
    • Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News
    • From American Society for Microbiology

International Year of Crystallography – 2014, IYCr 2014

International Year of Crystallography (IYCr 2014)

  • Author: ChemistryViews.org
  • Published: 01 January 2014
  • Copyright: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany

thumbnail image: International Year of Crystallography (IYCr 2014)

The International Year of Crystallography 2014 (IYCr 2014) highlights the continuing importance of crystallography.
It celebrates the centennial of X-ray diffraction. William Henry and William Lawrence Bragg showed that diffracted X-rays can be used to map the positions of atoms within a crystal. This allowed the detailed study of crystalline material.

Additionally, it commemorates the 400th anniversary of Kepler’s first studies which lead in 1611 to the observation of the symmetrical form of ice crystals. This was the beginning of the wider study of the role of symmetry in matter.


Article Views: 152

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From Wendy Warr, PhD, CHMINF-L, Jan. 2, 2014

Brain Facts — Website

This excellent website is divided into 6 parts:  Neuroscience, Brain Basics, Sensing/Thinking/Behaving, Diseases and Disorders, Across the Lifespan, and In Society

http://www.genengnews.com/best-of-the-web/brainfacts-org/2853/

Reviewed by GEN, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Dec. 2013

Open Access week is here — October 21-27 (2013)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L5rVH1KGBCY

Open access explained – 8 min video (PhD cartoon)

“Quite good”, writes

Anne Langley
Head Librarian, Science and Technology Libraries

Director of Scholarly Communications 

Chemistry Liaison 
Princeton University

P.S. More information about OA can be found at http://www.openaccessweek.org/

Science Matters, newsletter published by the EPA

Science Matters

http://epa.gov/research/sciencematters/

“The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) publishes the “Science Matters” newsletter to inform the general public about its research and advocacy activities on behalf of the American public. The newsletter was first published in 2010, and is a terrific source of information on everything from green chemistry to renewable energy. In the About this Issue area, visitors can learn about the topical focus of each issue. In the Science Features, visitors can read articles such as “Nanomaterials: Harnessing the Potential, Understanding the Risks” and “Partnerships for a Safer Chemical Future.” Users shouldn’t miss the Ask a Scientist feature, which profiles a different EPA scientist in each issue. The In the News area brings together updates about new partnerships with colleges, universities, and international collaborators. [KMG]

Source:  The Scout Report (Univ. of Wisconsin)  – May 3, 2013

Video Portal from Science, the journal

Science: Video Portal

http://video.sciencemag.org/

“The folks at Science magazine craft a wide palette of audio visual materials, many of which can be accessed through their video portal. In the Featured Videos, visitors can learn about some recent explorations into education reform, deep sea explorations, and the Higgs boson. Scrolling down the site, visitors will notice that the videos are divided into seven sections, including Engineering, Environment, and Medicine. It’s easy to see how these videos could be effectively used in a number of classroom situations to complement existing lectures and presentations. New users might do well to start with the “Alya Red: A Computational Heart” video and the rather thoughtful “California Meteorite Rush.” ”

Source:  The Scout Report (Univ. of Wisconsin)  – May 3, 2013

ResearchGate – LinkedIn for Scientists

“Most social network founders want to make money. Ijad Madisch, the scientist-CEO behind ResearchGate, has a higher goal: He wants to win a Nobel Prize for the network. 

Five years after its founding, Madisch’s plan doesn’t seem so far-fetched. ResearchGate, which has been described as “LinkedIn for scientists,” has 2.9 million users — about half of the international scientific community. Madisch has built a list of success stories in which scientists used ResearchGate to speed up their work. And as of now, he’s got a formidable supporter you may have heard of: Bill Gates.”

Source: ReadWrite [support=readwriteweb.com@mail320.us3.mcdlv.net]

Full article is here, complete with photo of a freckled Bill Gates:

http://readwrite.com/2013/06/04/bill-gates-researchgate?utm_source=ReadWrite+Newsletters&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=b883d1cdd5-RWWDailyNewsletter&utm_term=0_9fbeb5d667-b883d1cdd5-201299837