Bioinformatics Organization

From GEN’s “Best of the Web”, Jan. 15, 2014, there is a glowing review of http://www.bioinformatics.org  which makes available an assortment of resources for everyone, from beginners to experts.  There is introductory information, databases, software development projects, and analytical tools, such as PrimerX, which automate the design of mutagenic PCR primers.

GenEngNews – http://gen.epubxp.com/t/13060/2

Silence of the Genome

Cold Spring Harbor has provided a website with complete lab protocols for classroom experiments exploring the use of RNA interference in Caenorhabditis elegans,  RNAi in C. elegans  http://www.silencinggenomes.org

 There are 7 modules as part of the process for manipulating genes of C. elegans.

From GENENGNEWS, Jan. 15, 2014, “Best of the Web”

 

bioRxiv — the Preprint Server for Biology

bioRxiv is in beta.  This is from their “about” page:

bioRxiv (pronounced “bio-archive”) is a free online archive and distribution service for unpublished preprints in the life sciences. It is operated by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, a not-for-profit research and educational institution. By posting preprints on bioRxiv, authors are able to make their findings immediately available to the scientific community and receive feedback on draft manuscripts before they are submitted to journals.

Articles are not peer-reviewed, edited, or typeset before being posted online. However, all articles undergo a basic screening process for offensive and/or non-scientific content. No endorsement of an article’s methods, assumptions, conclusions, or scientific quality by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is implied by its appearance in bioRxiv. An article may be posted prior to, or concurrently with, submission to a journal but should not be posted if it has already been published.

Authors may submit a revised version of an article to bioRxiv at any time and can update the bioRxiv record with a link to a version of an article that has been published in a journal. Once posted on bioRxiv, articles are citable and therefore cannot be removed.”

From an email/ad from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press

Microbe World

URL:www.microbeworld.org
  • Lots of information over a variety of topics
    • Poor site organization—two separate navigational toolbars
    • Source: GEN “Best of the Web”, Sep 15, 2013 (Vol. 33, No. 16)
    • Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News
    • From American Society for Microbiology

International Year of Crystallography – 2014, IYCr 2014

International Year of Crystallography (IYCr 2014)

  • Author: ChemistryViews.org
  • Published: 01 January 2014
  • Copyright: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany

thumbnail image: International Year of Crystallography (IYCr 2014)

The International Year of Crystallography 2014 (IYCr 2014) highlights the continuing importance of crystallography.
It celebrates the centennial of X-ray diffraction. William Henry and William Lawrence Bragg showed that diffracted X-rays can be used to map the positions of atoms within a crystal. This allowed the detailed study of crystalline material.

Additionally, it commemorates the 400th anniversary of Kepler’s first studies which lead in 1611 to the observation of the symmetrical form of ice crystals. This was the beginning of the wider study of the role of symmetry in matter.


Article Views: 152

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From Wendy Warr, PhD, CHMINF-L, Jan. 2, 2014

Brain Facts — Website

This excellent website is divided into 6 parts:  Neuroscience, Brain Basics, Sensing/Thinking/Behaving, Diseases and Disorders, Across the Lifespan, and In Society

http://www.genengnews.com/best-of-the-web/brainfacts-org/2853/

Reviewed by GEN, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Dec. 2013

Open Access week is here — October 21-27 (2013)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L5rVH1KGBCY

Open access explained – 8 min video (PhD cartoon)

“Quite good”, writes

Anne Langley
Head Librarian, Science and Technology Libraries

Director of Scholarly Communications 

Chemistry Liaison 
Princeton University

P.S. More information about OA can be found at http://www.openaccessweek.org/

Sharing Research Data: When, in What Form, with Whom, and at What Cost?

MichaelCarroll2Sharing Research Data: When, in What Form, with Whom, and at What Cost?
Thursday, November 14, 2013, 4:30 p.m., McDonnell Hall Auditorium, room A02
Free and Open to the Public

Michael Carroll, Professor of Law and Director, Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property, American University Washington College of Law, Founding Member of Creative Commons

A talk sponsored jointly by Princeton University Library, the office of the Dean for Research, and OIT.

Should researchers share their data? If so, when, in what form, with whom, and at what cost are among the issues researchers, their funders and their employing institutions wrestle with on a daily basis. While these issues have been traditionally resolved by researchers on an ad hoc or discipline-wide basis, they are now becoming the subject of more formal understandings and policies under the rubric of “data management.” The National Science Foundation requires grantees plan for data management when seeking funding, and this expectation is likely to spread to other funding bodies that have come to appreciate the importance of data sharing and data reuse in science.

This talk focuses on the emerging policy framework for data management, with particular attention to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy’s directive concerning data arising from federal support agreements, and on other legal considerations for data sharing including intellectual property, privacy, and contractual terms of use. In most cases, data may readily be shared, with the notable exceptions of clinical and patient data. The principal legal and policy issues center primarily on providing researchers with incentives and infrastructure to meaningfully share data by ensuring that datasets are comprehensible and reusable by other researchers.

Professor Michael W. Carroll

Michael Carroll is a Professor of Law and Director of the Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property at American University Washington College of Law. His research and teaching specialties are intellectual property law and cyberlaw, focusing on the search for balance over time in the face of challenges posed by new technologies. He is a founding member of Creative Commons, Inc., a global organization that provides standardized legal and technical tools that enable legal sharing of cultural, educational, scientific and other copyrighted works.

Professor Carroll is recognized as a leading advocate for open access over the Internet to the research that appears in scholarly and scientific journals. He has written white papers and has given numerous presentations to university faculty, administrators, and staff around the country on this issue. In addition, he serves on the Board of Directors of the Public Library of Science and recently completed service on the National Research Council’s Board on Research Data and Information. He also is an Academic Fellow of the Center for Democracy and Technology and is a member of the Advisory Board to Public Knowledge.

Prior to entering law teaching, Professor Carroll practiced law at Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering in Washington, D.C. and served as a law clerk to Judith W. Rogers, U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit and to Judge Joyce Hens Green, U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. He received his A.B. (Anthropology), with general honors, from the University of Chicago and his J.D. magna cum laude, from the Georgetown University Law Center.

Questions or comments, contact: rdmteam@princeton.e
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