NBII To Be Taken Offline Permanently January 15, 2012

“In recent years, however, the NBII–like so many other important federal programs–was plagued with budget cuts. The FY 2012 budget mandated its termination. The main Web site, www.nbii.gov, will be taken offline on January 15, 2012, along with all of its associated node sites.

The NBII provided three main benefits to the biological resource community. First, its design as a federation of partners allowed it to assist data owners in maintaining critical assets that might not otherwise be made broadly available; second, scientists, managers, and others searching for data on a particular subject could do so from a single, Web-based source rather than having to go to the sites of numerous organizations to compile the results they sought; and third, the NBII provided users with direct access to many data resources that are deeply embedded in structured databases on the Web and that are relevant to biology–resources that would not be revealed to them using a standard search engine such as Google.

USGS staff now are working with partners to identify ways that–to the extent possible–will help to fill the gap in data access that will be created when the NBII goes offline.”

To read more about the National Biological Information Infrastructure, here’s a link from which the above quote was taken:

http://www.usgs.gov/core_science_systems/Access/p1111-1.html

A Postscript:

“The Library of Congress is a part of a collaborative web archive project to archive U.S. Federal Government Websites, and this site has been crawled by the Internet Archive as a part of that project. It is not publicly accessible yet but it has been preserved.

 

Since we’re a part of the collaborative project, we’ll eventually get a copy of that capture for the Library of Congress archives.”

 

/mrc (Margaret Clifton, mcli@loc.gov)

 

Cloud data storage for medical records — bad idea

Top 10 list rejects cloud for clinical data

By George Miller

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The debate continues over whether cloud platforms can secure highly sensitive clinical trial data and health records. But eWeek makes no bones about its position in a top 10 list of why it’s a bad idea to store such records up there.

The 11-slide presentation encapsulates both well-known and less-well-known arguments for data storage via local services rather than an Internet-based, on-demand system. Among them: the highly sensitive nature of the data makes it a hacker target from the get-go.

Trust is a factor that runs throughout the list: trust in the cloud service provider that it can and will restrict access to the barest minimum, that it truly de-personalizes data, and even that it will still be in existence tomorrow.

A disclosure statement concerning source material explains the anti-cloud bias. But the list remains a useful one.

- here’s the slide show

Related Articles:
Experts: Beware of breaches in cloud computing
Cloud experts agree: choose carefully

Source: FierceBiotech IT [editors@fiercebiotechit.com] 8.23.10

NSF requests data sharing plans with grant applications

"National Science Foundation Sets Rules for Sharing Data

The National Science Foundation will soon begin requiring all grant applicants to submit a two-page plan describing how they will manage and share any data that is accumulated as part of their grant, in the latest example of a growing effort to ensure public access to findings financed with taxpayer dollars, Science magazine’s ScienceInsider blog reported."

Source:  Chronicle of Higher Education, May 7, 2010, via Jane Holmquist