Science Advances — new OA journal from AAAS

US AAAS launches new title – Science Advances - 14 Feb 2014

“The non-profit American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), publisher of the Science family of journals, plans an expansion of its scientific communication efforts with the launch of a new title, Science Advances, as an extended forum for high-quality, peer-reviewed research.

Spanning science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and the social sciences, the new digital publication will leverage Science’s uniquely broad scope to help speed scientific progress by promoting the rapid communication of current research. Science Advances will be published online – on an open-access basis, with articles freely available to the public – through the payment, by authors, of an article processing fee.”

Click here

Source:  Knowledgespeak Newsletter, 2/14/14

Video Portal from Science, the journal

Science: Video Portal

http://video.sciencemag.org/

“The folks at Science magazine craft a wide palette of audio visual materials, many of which can be accessed through their video portal. In the Featured Videos, visitors can learn about some recent explorations into education reform, deep sea explorations, and the Higgs boson. Scrolling down the site, visitors will notice that the videos are divided into seven sections, including Engineering, Environment, and Medicine. It’s easy to see how these videos could be effectively used in a number of classroom situations to complement existing lectures and presentations. New users might do well to start with the “Alya Red: A Computational Heart” video and the rather thoughtful “California Meteorite Rush.” ”

Source:  The Scout Report (Univ. of Wisconsin)  – May 3, 2013

Search Engines, etc. for finding Free Online STEM Resources

“Search Engines and Beyond: A Toolkit for Find­ing Free Online Resources for Sci­ence, Tech­nol­ogy and Engi­neer­ing“
By Nedelina Tchangalova and Francy Stil­well, Uni­ver­sity of Maryland

in the Spring, 2012 issue of Sci­ence and Tech­nol­ogy Librar­i­an­ship  [ http://www.istl.org/ ]

Boosting STEM research, proposals by McGraw-Hill Research Foundation

McGraw-Hill Research Foundation releases paper on strategies to boost STEM research – 27 Sep 2011

The McGraw-Hill Research Foundation has released a new policy paper by Dr. Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, that seeks to offer practical and scalable solutions to the problem of inadequate supply of college graduates excelling in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Dr. Hrabowski is President of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). He says research in STEM is critical as the US addresses key challenges in healthcare, the environment, national security and the economy.

In the paper, Institutional Change in Higher Education: Innovation and Collaboration, Dr. Hrabowski discusses how his institution has addressed the shortage of STEM graduates, particularly among groups that have been underrepresented in these fields, including minorities, women and students from low-income backgrounds. UMBC has been recognised widely as a leader in higher education innovation, according to him. For three years in a row, the US News and World Report America’s Best Colleges Guide has ranked the university number one among ‘Up-and-Coming’ national universities.

To help meet the growing demand for STEM experts nationwide and encourage institutional change, Dr. Hrabowski urges colleges and universities to establish priorities, focus on strategic planning, and emphasise effectiveness and efficiency in the use of resources; reflect on their institution’s culture, taking into account school values, practices, habits and even the relationships among faculty, staff, and students; encourage the involvement of the entire campus, including faculty, administration, and students, in understanding and addressing broad retention issues and general academic performance; focus on the importance of group study and other approaches that inform redesign for first-year STEM courses; increase support for minority groups by providing knowledge and skill development, academic and social integration, support and motivation, and advising and monitoring; and develop distinct programmes and initiatives that address change needed in graduate programmes.

Dr. Hrabowski shows that the framework developed through the Meyerhoff Scholars Program underlies other important programmes and initiatives at UMBC that have helped create a campus climate of inclusive excellence. He will discuss the paper’s themes as a featured speaker at the third annual Innovation in Education Summit in New York City on September 28, 2011. Sponsored by The McGraw-Hill Research Foundation, the event brings together experts to discuss critical issues and trends and their impact on today’s education environment.”

Source: Knowledgespeak Newsletter

“Change the Equation” new government mandated non-profit led by CEOs to improve STEM education

White House Announces Launch of New Nonprofit to Strengthen STEM Education
The President at MLK Charter School in New Orleans, White House Photo, Pete Souza, 11/15/09.

The Obama administration announced today the launch of “Change the Equation,” a new nonprofit corporation led by CEOs in an effort to improve education in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). According to the White House, the initiative is a response to the president’s speech at the National Academy of Sciences in April 2009 in which he urged Americans to elevate STEM education as a national priority. The National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and National Research Council have a long history of efforts to improve STEM education, including the influential 2005 report Rising Above the Gathering Storm: Energizing and Employing America for a Brighter Economic Future, which urged improvements in K-12 STEM education to keep the U.S. economically competitive.

NTRL — an expanded version of NTIS Government Reports Index

Besides NTIS, available via Engineering Village/Elsevier, Princeton University now has access to NTRL (National Technical Reports Library) (1800+) from the U.S. Government.

It provides indexing and access to a collection of more than 2,000,000 historical and current unclassified government technical reports archived by the National Technical Information Service.  Over 500,000 documents are available in full-text from departments such as Department of Energy, NASA, and the Environmental Protection Agency.

NTRS differs from NTIS in that it covers more years, mainly from 1960, but as far back as 1800.  The database is updated daily and there is full text for about 25% of the reports. 

Source:  P.U.’s Engineering Library and  Database Management Group

Knovel launches Nanotechnology collection

"Knovel launches Nanotechnology collection – 02 Dec 2009

Knovel, an online resource for engineers, has announced the availability of the Nanotechnology collection. The new collection seeks to help engineers expand their knowledge base and build expertise in this rapidly-growing multi-disciplinary area.

The Nanotechnology collection features content from leading publishers including Elsevier, McGraw-Hill, Springer, Smithers Rapra, Royal Society of Chemistry, World Scientific and Wiley. It focusses on nanoscale materials, nanostructure-dependent properties and phenomena data as well as fabrication and manufacturing techniques. Subtopics within the collection include Nanostructures and Micro/Nanodevices; Micro/Nanofabrication and Manufacturing Techniques; Nanobiotechnology; Environmental Nanotechnology and Environmental Safety; and Nanocomposites.

Knovel is an online resource that helps engineers find reliable technical information. Knovel’s reliable content, optimised search and interactive tools, help engineers solve problems faster by providing answers at the point of need, in turn helping organisations increase the productivity of their engineering staff."
 

From Knowledgespeak Newsletter.

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From PUL’s Articles and Databases listing:

Collection of the latest leading technical and engineering reference books.

Scitopia now with streamlined links to RefWorks

"Federated search services provider Deep Web Technologies, US, has announced that its federated search product, Explorit Research Accelerator, now includes seamless integration with RefWorks, a web-based solution for citations management."

source: Knowledgespeak Newsletter, July 30, 2009

Scitopia was developed by 21 top technological and scientific societies.  It is a freely available database mainly in physics and engineering.  Component societies are listed on a webpage off www.scitopia.org.  It lists papers going back as early as 1665, some of which are digitized.

Full text is offered on a pay-per-view basis, so currently it is better to search Princeton’s subscription databases which have links to our full-text subscription resources.  INSPEC  and Compendex  cover even more resources than Scitopia.  IEEE  — Xplore & IEL – are other overlapping subscription databases we have, and they are completely full-text.

NTIS – National Technical Information Services — RSS Feeds

 The Nation’s Source for Scientific Information

"NTIS undergoes a rigorous process to ensure that all the information we offer is authentic and credible. This integrity, along with the breadth and depth of our collection, is why NTIS is regarded as the nation’s preeminent source of government information." 

NTIS is now offering RSS feeds to any of its 39 major subject categories.  One may subscribe to receive the latest titles, weekly.   For a listing of Scope Notes that defines the specific topical content for each, go to  http://www.ntis.gov/pdf/scopenotes.pdf

To subscribe to the Newsletter, write to: ntrnews@ntis.gov

 "The National Technical Information Service (NTIS), is the nation’s largest and most comprehensive source of government-funded scientific, technical, engineering and business-related information."

 

Source: NTIS Technical Reports Newsletter, Vol. 1(4), October 15, 2008