March to the Moon — new digital archive from NASA & ASU

“Arizona State University announced last week the launch (no pun intended) of the new Project Gemini Online Digital Archive, an online archive of NASA’s Gemini spacecraft flights. (From the announcement: “Project Gemini (1964-1966) was the second United States human spaceflight program, after Project Mercury (1960-1963). The overarching goal was to test systems and operations critical to the Apollo program (1961-1975), conceived with the purpose of ‘landing a man on the Moon and returning him safely to the Earth’.” The archive is available at http://tothemoon.ser.asu.edu/. “

Source:  Tara Calishain’s ResearchBuzz Jan. 19, 2012

Microbe World — Website with news, videos, images…

Microbe World (Last reviewed in the Scout Report on November 19, 1999)

http://www.microbeworld.org/

“Microbe World has grown by leaps and bounds since the Scout Report last reviewed the site. First-time visitors will notice that the homepage contains a featured image and a featured video, which usually features a science expert speaking on microbes via an archived webcast. Moving on, the right-hand side of the homepage contains informational videos that cover how to get started with using Microbe World. The “Videos” tab will allow users to learn from dozens of videos that cover a gamut of topics, such as genetically engineered bacteria and an investigation into the origins of the Black Plague. Visitors can also use the “Images” tab to view high quality images of microbes taken from various research laboratories, science organizations, and so on. Finally, users can use the “Resources” area to view laboratory demonstrations and find out about new microbe-related apps that are under development.”

Source: University of Wisconsin’s Scout Report 10/21/11 

Image Search comes to Science.gov

“Science.gov introduces Image Search link – 21 Dec 2010

Science.gov, a gateway to government science information provided by US Government science agencies, has introduced an Image Search link under Special Collections to enable users to quickly find science images, including animal and plant, weather and space, and earth and sun images and more. The information is free and no registration is required.

To begin with, three databases are being searched from one search box. These include: The National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII) Library of Images from the Environment (LIFE), The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Image eXchange (NIX) and The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Photo Library. More image databases will be added in the coming months.

In addition to the image search, Science.gov has undergone significant software upgrade for quicker performance. It has included both the Federal Register and Code of Federal Regulations in the basic search and also provides an author cluster on the results page. The alerts service has also been upgraded so that users can manage their Science.gov alerts directly from their alerts email and get daily alerts rather than weekly.

Science.gov is hosted by the Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information, within the Office of Science, and is supported by CENDI, an interagency working group of senior scientific and technical information managers. Currently in its fifth generation, Science.gov provides a search of over 42 scientific databases and 200 million pages of science information with just one query.”
Source:  Knowledgespeak Newsletter, 12/21/10

PubMed bibliographic records are enhanced by Images from NCBI

“The PubMed Abstract display for PubMed Central® articles will be enhanced to include an image strip generated from the soon-to-be-released National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Images database.”  To see an example, click on the linked article below:

 

Canese K. PubMed® Display Enhanced with Images from the New NCBI Images Database. NLM Tech Bull. 2010 Sep-Oct;(376):e14.

Geological resources from the Scout Report

Today’s Scout Report from the University of Wisconsin highlights a couple of websites/resources of interest:

The Perkins Geology Museum at the University of Vermont
http://www.uvm.edu/perkins/index.html  — The "Perkins Digital Archive" contains >1000 images of minerals, fossils and rocks. Their collection of  > 24,000 photos documenting Vermont’s "Landscape Change Program" dates from 1690.  These collections are searchable.
 
The Barren Lands

The area west of Hudson Bay in northern Manitoba and Saskatchewan was thoroughly documented and explored by Canadian geologist, J.B. Tyrrell in 1893 and 1894.  There are >5000 images in this collection at the University of Toronto.

DOE Data Explorer — online scientific research data portal

" US Department of Energy launches open data repository - 04 Jul 2008

The US Department of Energy has launched the DOE Data Explorer (DDE), a tool to find scientific research data generated in the course of DOE-sponsored research in various science disciplines. The data that can be found include computer simulations, numeric data files, figures and plots, interactive maps, multimedia and scientific images.

The DOE Data Explorer includes a database of citations prepared by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) based on the information found at data-hosting web sites. It is intended to be particularly useful to students, the public, and to researchers who are new to a field or looking for experimental or observational data outside their normal field of expertise.

One can browse or search the database, then link to a data collection where it resides. Users will often find specialised search interfaces and software toolkits developed by the data owners. These allow the users to search deeper into the data files and help them understand, analyse and use the data within the context of their own research interests.

The publicly available data collections support DOE research results that are well documented in journal articles, conference literature and technical reports. Key DOE databases of R&D information are searchable through the Science Accelerator. The DOE Data Explorer will include enhanced search capabilities across specialised web sites as it continues to grow."

Source: Knowledgespeak Newsletter, July 4, 2008