JISC announces support for govt. recommendations for peer review process changes

JISC  (Joint Information Systems Committee) in the U.K. is supporting an open peer review process.  It should be more transparent and reviewers should be trained.  JISC also recommends the sharing of data in the scientific community, and there is mention in this brief of the Dryad project to facilitate this sharing of data in a repository.
“The recommendations came out of a House of Commons Science and Technology
Committee report that also urged that researchers make their scientific data
publicly available, and that reviewers have formal training.”

Source: Knowledgespeak Newsletter, Aug. 2, 2011.

‘Open Science’ report — part of the UK’s “Research 3.0″

JISC releases ‘Open Science’ report – 13 Nov 2009

"The Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC), UK, has released a report as part of its ‘Research 3.0 – driving the knowledge economy’ activity, which launches at the end of November. The new ‘Open Science’ report trails key research trends that could purportedly have far-reaching implications for science, universities and the UK society."

"The report looks at how technologies can support the open movement to share data, workflows, methods and research outputs. It also illustrates the vital role librarians could have in supporting these new trends and the recognised need to build relationships between researchers and librarians to support the research of the future."

"Open Science — the future for research?"  Link to this press release:

http://www.jisc.ac.uk/news/stories/2009/11/openscience.aspx

From KnowledgeSpeak Newsletter

Open Access Repositories joined by the UK’s JISC

UK JISC becomes founding member of the Confederation of Open Access Repositories26 Oct 2009

"The UK’s Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) has become a founding member of the Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR). COAR is an international not-for-profit association that aims to promote greater visibility and application of research outputs through global networks of Open Access (OA) digital repositories.

Inspired from the European DRIVER repositories project, which helps to enhance repository development, COAR takes this vision to an international scale. Founding members of the Confederation include members from North America, China, Japan and Europe. Joining COAR at the early stage of its development means members will be able to contribute to shaping the organisation’s objectives which will look at interoperability, raising awareness and promoting OA repositories, supporting the repository community and working with partners in closely related fields such as research management and publishing.

Open Access repositories seek to offer researchers and universities the chance to significantly increase the impact of their research outputs, with the potential for significant benefits for UK higher education and the economy and society more widely. The aim of COAR is to enhance and progress the provision, visibility and application of research outputs through global networks of Open Access repositories."
 

Source:  Knowledgespeak Newsletter, Oct. 26, 2009

Open Access publishing could generate savings — a UK study

 Open access publishing offers economic benefits, says UK research – 29 Jan 2009

The UK’s Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) has commissioned a new research project to study the economic and social implications of new models for scholarly publishing. According to the findings of the research, sharing research information via a more open access (OA) publishing model would bring millions of pounds worth of savings to the higher education sector apart from benefiting corporate UK. Prof. John Houghton from the Centre of Strategic Economic Studies at Melbourne’s Victoria University and Prof. Charles Oppenheim at Loughborough University were asked to lead the research.

The research centred on three models – subscription or toll access publishing which involves reader charges and use restrictions; OA publishing where access is free and publication is funded from the authors’ side; and OA self-archiving where academic authors post their work in online repositories, making it freely available to all Internet users.

The research and findings reveal that core scholarly publishing system activities cost the UK higher education sector around £5 billion in 2007. Using the different models, the report shows what the estimated cost would have been. When considering costs per journal article, the researchers believe that the UK higher education sector could have saved around £80 million a year by shifting from toll access to OA publishing. They also claim that £115 million could be saved by moving from toll access to OA self-archiving.

In addition to that, the financial return to the UK industry from greater accessibility to research might result in an additional £172 million per annum worth of benefits from government and higher education sector research alone.

Click here

Source:  Knowledgespeak Newsletter, Jan. 29, 2009

Free service collects tables of content

 

RI Newsline – Issue 24 – December 2008

Research Information [mail@europascience.com]

17 December 2008

"A new free service makes it easier to keep up-to-date with scholarly journals.ticTOCs  – Journal Tables of Contents Service provides access to the most recent tables of contents of over 11,000 scholarly journals from more than 400 publishers.  It helps scholars, researchers, academics and anyone else keep up-to-date with what’s being published in the most recent issues of journals on almost any subject. "

This is funded and developed by a coalition of academic institutions,organizations, and publishers.

For more information:  http://www.researchinformation.info/news/news_story.php?news_id=418