Science Advances — new OA journal from AAAS

US AAAS launches new title – Science Advances - 14 Feb 2014

“The non-profit American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), publisher of the Science family of journals, plans an expansion of its scientific communication efforts with the launch of a new title, Science Advances, as an extended forum for high-quality, peer-reviewed research.

Spanning science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and the social sciences, the new digital publication will leverage Science’s uniquely broad scope to help speed scientific progress by promoting the rapid communication of current research. Science Advances will be published online – on an open-access basis, with articles freely available to the public – through the payment, by authors, of an article processing fee.”

Click here

Source:  Knowledgespeak Newsletter, 2/14/14

Search Engines, etc. for finding Free Online STEM Resources

“Search Engines and Beyond: A Toolkit for Find­ing Free Online Resources for Sci­ence, Tech­nol­ogy and Engi­neer­ing“
By Nedelina Tchangalova and Francy Stil­well, Uni­ver­sity of Maryland

in the Spring, 2012 issue of Sci­ence and Tech­nol­ogy Librar­i­an­ship  [ http://www.istl.org/ ]

Boosting STEM research, proposals by McGraw-Hill Research Foundation

McGraw-Hill Research Foundation releases paper on strategies to boost STEM research – 27 Sep 2011

The McGraw-Hill Research Foundation has released a new policy paper by Dr. Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, that seeks to offer practical and scalable solutions to the problem of inadequate supply of college graduates excelling in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Dr. Hrabowski is President of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). He says research in STEM is critical as the US addresses key challenges in healthcare, the environment, national security and the economy.

In the paper, Institutional Change in Higher Education: Innovation and Collaboration, Dr. Hrabowski discusses how his institution has addressed the shortage of STEM graduates, particularly among groups that have been underrepresented in these fields, including minorities, women and students from low-income backgrounds. UMBC has been recognised widely as a leader in higher education innovation, according to him. For three years in a row, the US News and World Report America’s Best Colleges Guide has ranked the university number one among ‘Up-and-Coming’ national universities.

To help meet the growing demand for STEM experts nationwide and encourage institutional change, Dr. Hrabowski urges colleges and universities to establish priorities, focus on strategic planning, and emphasise effectiveness and efficiency in the use of resources; reflect on their institution’s culture, taking into account school values, practices, habits and even the relationships among faculty, staff, and students; encourage the involvement of the entire campus, including faculty, administration, and students, in understanding and addressing broad retention issues and general academic performance; focus on the importance of group study and other approaches that inform redesign for first-year STEM courses; increase support for minority groups by providing knowledge and skill development, academic and social integration, support and motivation, and advising and monitoring; and develop distinct programmes and initiatives that address change needed in graduate programmes.

Dr. Hrabowski shows that the framework developed through the Meyerhoff Scholars Program underlies other important programmes and initiatives at UMBC that have helped create a campus climate of inclusive excellence. He will discuss the paper’s themes as a featured speaker at the third annual Innovation in Education Summit in New York City on September 28, 2011. Sponsored by The McGraw-Hill Research Foundation, the event brings together experts to discuss critical issues and trends and their impact on today’s education environment.”

Source: Knowledgespeak Newsletter

Stanford and UC Berkeley create massively collaborative math

MathOverflow

“In a stunning example of the power of the Internet to attract and connect the smartest minds on earth around the most difficult problems, scholars at UC Berkeley and Stanford have created a free website, called MathOverflow, which is transforming math research.”

Article from the Mercury News 8-8-10

Cornell University Library Historical Math Monographs Collection

Cornell University Library Historical Math Monographs Collection

http://digital.library.cornell.edu/m/math/

"The Cornell University Library Historical Math Monographs Collection has a rather interesting history. The collection began when a number of brittle and decaying math monographs were digitally scanned using equipment developed by Cornell and the Xerox Corporation. This collection brings together all of those documents, including a selection of other relevant papers and scholarly works. All told, there are over 1,000 works here, and visitors can use the "Browse" section to look over the offerings by title or author. Additionally, visitors can perform detailed searches across the entire collection. Visitors should also take a look at the "Selected Titles" on the homepage to get a sense of what lies within this rather compelling collection. Finally, there is a "Help" section that provides some hints on making the best use of the site."

Source:  The Scout Report from the University of Wisconsin, 27 Feb, 2009