Video Portal from Science, the journal

Science: Video Portal

http://video.sciencemag.org/

“The folks at Science magazine craft a wide palette of audio visual materials, many of which can be accessed through their video portal. In the Featured Videos, visitors can learn about some recent explorations into education reform, deep sea explorations, and the Higgs boson. Scrolling down the site, visitors will notice that the videos are divided into seven sections, including Engineering, Environment, and Medicine. It’s easy to see how these videos could be effectively used in a number of classroom situations to complement existing lectures and presentations. New users might do well to start with the “Alya Red: A Computational Heart” video and the rather thoughtful “California Meteorite Rush.” ”

Source:  The Scout Report (Univ. of Wisconsin)  — May 3, 2013

PubMed Health — A comprehensive online resource about “what works”

“NLM Announces Expansion of PubMed Health

New Resources Create a Comprehensive Online Resource for Clinical Effectiveness Reviews

 

The National Library of Medicine (NLM), the world’s largest medical library and a component of the National Institutes of Health, announces the expansion of the information available from PubMed Health (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/), which provides integrated access to clinical effectiveness reviews.  

NLM’s National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), in partnership with England’s national Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, the Cochrane Collaboration, the US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and other agencies in the US and abroad, now makes available more than 18,000 clinical effectiveness reviews via PubMed Health. PubMed Health organizes these clinical effectiveness research results, including full texts as well as summary information, for consumers and clinicians.

Effectiveness studies are essential for informed clinical and consumer decision making. Multiple studies are necessary over time, and interpreting their complex and often conflicting results is a challenge.

Systematic reviews of clinical effectiveness studies address this need with rigorous scientific methodology. However, they are scattered across the biomedical literature and the Web sites of public health agencies around the world that produce many of them. The National Library of Medicine is uniquely positioned to gather these critical clinical resources in one place.

Users of PubMed Health can: 

  • Access the whole comprehensive collection of resources in a single search, including cancer information for consumers and clinicians from the National Cancer Institute
  • See the results of a simultaneous search for reviews in PubMed
  • Refer to consumer medical encyclopedia search results also delivered simultaneously
  • Follow RSS feeds of featured reviews and “Behind Headlines,” which looks at the research behind news stories
  • Learn to make sense of research results in its “Understand clinical effectiveness” and “Behind Headlines” sections
  • Share resources via e-mail and social media with “Add this”

NLM invites you to visit PubMed Health, learn more about the Web site (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/about/) or follow the project on Twitter @PubMedHealth (https://twitter.com/PubMedHealth) to help you keep up with the evidence on healthcare effectiveness.”

Source: NLM New files for the week of Dec 12, 2011 (NLM Announces)

NTRL — an expanded version of NTIS Government Reports Index

Besides NTIS, available via Engineering Village/Elsevier, Princeton University now has access to NTRL (National Technical Reports Library) (1800+) from the U.S. Government.

It provides indexing and access to a collection of more than 2,000,000 historical and current unclassified government technical reports archived by the National Technical Information Service.  Over 500,000 documents are available in full-text from departments such as Department of Energy, NASA, and the Environmental Protection Agency.

NTRS differs from NTIS in that it covers more years, mainly from 1960, but as far back as 1800.  The database is updated daily and there is full text for about 25% of the reports. 

Source:  P.U.’s Engineering Library and  Database Management Group

New Portuguese scientific OA repository launched

Portugal New Portuguese scientific OA repository launched19 Dec 2008

Portugal’s publicly-funded Repositório Científico de Acesso Aberto de Portugal (RCAAP) was recently launched at the 3rd Open Access conference that took place at University of Minho on December 15 – 16, 2008. RCAAP gathers content from 10 institutional repositories from across the country.

The new open access repository currently indexes more than 13091 documents from 10 repositories. The project is funded by the Knowledge Society Agency (UMIC) and will be technically maintained by the National Scientific Computations Foundation (FCCN).

The 10 repositories that are currently contributing to this main centralised repository are mainly university DSpace-based repositories or similar.

Approximately 10% are in English.  Topics appear to be mainly biomedical.

Source: Knowledgespeak Newsletter, Dec. 19, 2008.