Earth Day videos — on Water & our Changing Planet

Celebrate Earth Day with Changing Planet and Sustainability: Water

In preparation for Earth Day on April 22, explore NBC Learn’s Original Collections Changing Planet and Sustainability: Water. These earth science series, produced in partnership with the National Science Foundation, cover headline issues from the future of California’s water supply to how butterflies are adapting to warmer temperatures. Use these videos to engage and involve your students in the environmental issues in the news today.

Changing Planet             Sustainability: Water

K-12 | HigherEd               K-12 | HigherEd

Source:  NBC Learn April 2014 Newsletter

One can sign up for a free trial.

Interactive Physics Simulations

“Interactive Physics Simulations [Flash]

http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulations/category/physics

At the top of this site’s homepage, visitors will see a banner that proclaims “Over 70 million simulations delivered.” Needless to say, the Interactive Physics Simulations site is quite popular, and the offerings here can be used in the classroom or by persons with a general curiosity about static electricity, alpha decay, and other related topics. The site is sponsored by a range of institutions, including the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and the National Science Foundation. The site includes three dozen different simulations, many of which are available in over a dozen languages, including French, Russian, Chinese, Italian, and Vietnamese. First-time visitors might want to start with the “Build an Atom” which affords visitors the opportunity to build an atom out of protons, neutrons, and electrons and then play a fun game after they’re done. Also, users can look at the simulations by topical headings, which include “Sound & Waves”, “Heat & Thermo”, and “Light & Radition”. ”

Source:  Scout Report, Univ. of Wisconsin, Apr. 13, 2012

NSF requests data sharing plans with grant applications

"National Science Foundation Sets Rules for Sharing Data

The National Science Foundation will soon begin requiring all grant applicants to submit a two-page plan describing how they will manage and share any data that is accumulated as part of their grant, in the latest example of a growing effort to ensure public access to findings financed with taxpayer dollars, Science magazine’s ScienceInsider blog reported."

Source:  Chronicle of Higher Education, May 7, 2010, via Jane Holmquist

Applied Math and Science Education Repository — AMSER

The Applied Math and Science Education Repository is aimed at providing web resources for community colleges, technical schools, and the general public.  The link takes you to the science — and technology — resources.

From their home page: "AMSER is a portal of educational resources and services built specifically for use by those in Community and Technical Colleges but free for anyone to use."

"AMSER is funded by the National Science Foundation as part of the National Science Digital Library, and is being created by a team of project partners led by Internet Scout."

Science & Engineering Statistics at NSF.gov

National Science Foundation: Science and Engineering Statistics

http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/

"Scholars, journalists and members of the general public will have a field day with the National Science Foundation’s Science and Engineering Statistics website. Visitors will note that the data contained within the site includes publications, working papers, data spreadsheets, and analyses divided into broad areas that include "Education", "Federal Government", "Industry", "International", and "Social Dimensions". Users can delve deeper into these broad areas and come up with related publications, policy briefs, and so on. Near the bottom of the page, visitors can look over the "New Releases" area for new reports on federal science and engineering support to universities, research expenditures, and the ethnicity and gender makeup of federal scientists and engineers. Finally, visitors can also sign up to receive their RSS feed."

Source:  University of Wisconsin’s Scout Report