Emerging trends and top innovators in science & technology — Thomson-Reuters

Follow the links to learn about some of the…


  • 2015 Top 100 Global Innovators
  • Predicting the World in 2025  (Emerging trends in Science & Technology)
  • Innovation — from Discovery to Delivery (video)  (Controlling the innovation life cycle)
  • US Thomson Reuters announces the world’s most influential scientific minds – 18 Jan 2016

    The Intellectual Property (IP) and Science business of Thomson Reuters, has announced the release of ‘The World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds,’ a citation analysis identifying the scientists – as determined by their fellow researchers – who have made the most significant global impact within their respective field of study.

    The two-part study includes an 11 year assessment of research paper citations to determine the leaders within 21 broad fields of science and a ranking of 2015’s top scientists or ‘hottest researchers,’ revealing significant growth in cancer genomics and improvements in converting solar cells into renewable energy.

    The report draws on data and analysis performed by Thomson Reuters IP & and Science bibliometric experts via InCites™ Essential Science Indicators℠, a leading web-based research analytics platform and a unique compilation of science performance metrics and trend data based on scholarly paper publication counts and citation data from the Web of Science™, the premier web-based environment for scientific and scholarly research.

    The longer-range study, widely known as the Highly Cited Researchers, recognises nearly 3,000 scientists who published the greatest number of articles ranking among the top one percent by citations received in their respective fields in each paper’s year of publication. Analysts assessed more than 120,000 papers indexed between 2003 and 2013 throughout each area of study.

    The 2015 hottest researchers ranking spotlights the scientific community’s emerging trends and 19 innovators, who recently published at least 14 papers with notably high levels of citations. The list was identified by tabulating citations within the Web of Science recorded during calendar year 2014 for papers published between 2012 and 2014.

    Stacey B. Gabriel of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard tops the list for the second consecutive year for her contributions to the Cancer Genome Atlas project, providing molecular portraits of tumors afflicting the breast, lung and other areas of the body. Her most recent papers examine the genetic underpinnings of schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s. She is followed by newcomer, Oxford University’s Henry J. Snaith, a physics and material scientist for his work on perovskite solar cells to advance solar energy technology. ”

    Brought to you by Scope e-Knowledge Center, a world-leading provider of abstraction, indexing, entity extraction and knowledge organisation models (Taxonomies, Thesauri and Ontologies).

    Click here  Jan. 18, 2016

70 million substances (CAS)

“CAS Registry registers 70 millionth substance – 07 Dec 2012

Chemical information provider Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS), a division of the American Chemical Society, has announced a major milestone for the CAS Registry, the largest collection of publicly disclosed chemical substance information. CAS scientists registered the 70 millionth substance from a patent application submitted to the Korean Intellectual Property Office (KIPO).

The 70 millionth substance is a potential T-type calcium channel blocker discovered at the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), a multidisciplinary research institute in Seoul, South Korea. Assigned CAS Registry Number® 1411769-41-9, the substance is one of several pyrazolyl-piperazine compounds disclosed in the patent application published by KIPO on November 14, 2012. This molecule may be useful in the treatment of epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, dementia and other conditions.

Similar to the 60 millionth substance registered in May 2011, the 70 millionth substance again reflects the value of patents as an important source of chemical information. In fact, more than 70 percent of new substances from the literature registered in 2012 originated from patents. To ensure the completeness and quality of the CAS premier substance collection, CAS scientists analyse, organise and curate chemistry in patents from 63 patent authorities around the world.

Click here

Source:  today’s Knowledgespeak Newsletter

Scitopia now with streamlined links to RefWorks

"Federated search services provider Deep Web Technologies, US, has announced that its federated search product, Explorit Research Accelerator, now includes seamless integration with RefWorks, a web-based solution for citations management."

source: Knowledgespeak Newsletter, July 30, 2009

Scitopia was developed by 21 top technological and scientific societies.  It is a freely available database mainly in physics and engineering.  Component societies are listed on a webpage off www.scitopia.org.  It lists papers going back as early as 1665, some of which are digitized.

Full text is offered on a pay-per-view basis, so currently it is better to search Princeton’s subscription databases which have links to our full-text subscription resources.  INSPEC  and Compendex  cover even more resources than Scitopia.  IEEE  — Xplore & IEL — are other overlapping subscription databases we have, and they are completely full-text.

Scitopia now offers an advanced alerts service

"Scitopia.org, designed for direct access to the best in science and technology research, provides a one-stop search interface to more than three and a half million peer-reviewed articles and conference proceedings, fifty million patents, and full-text documents from government websites. Founded in 2007, scitopia.org spans 350 years of data, federating the scholarly content from twenty-one societies, and six government information sources. Each search is run against all or selected digital collections. Results are then aggregated, de-duplicated and ranked for maximum search efficiency."  ( First mentioned in this blog, Oct. 23, 2008, as part of DTIC’s MultiSearch.)

Update: New alerting service

 "Deep Web Technologies launches advanced alerts service in Scitopia.org – 06 Mar 2009

Federated search services provider Deep Web Technologies, US, has launched their advanced alerts service in Scitopia.org, the free, federated search portal powered by Deep Web Technologies’ Explorit Research Accelerator. Scitopia.org Alerts delivers science and engineering content of interest to users through email and RSS feeds automatically, rather than forcing users to come to scitopia.org to perform searches themselves. The service makes it easy for users to stay current on research from the deep web libraries of major science and engineering societies, such as IEEE, Institute of Physics, American Physical Society as well as patent databases and government sources."

"Scitopia.org Alerts service automatically runs searches requested by users on the terms and those societies they choose to include in their search. The technology “remembers” which search results have already been delivered to the user and sends only new results, making it a powerful tool for researchers to identify new publications and articles in their areas of interest. Alerts can be created for any term or field, including author, abstracts, and affiliations. The technology also recognizes institutional subscriptions to society content and automatically authenticates those users, allowing them to click through to the full text from the Alert. Others can purchase full text on a pay-per-view basis."

Click here

Source: Knowledgespeak Newsletter 3/6/09

Free Patent Databases

In response to a question put to the Engineering Division of the Special Libraries Association, Mike White at Queen’s University in Ontario, writes:

"For teaching and research purposes, the public patent databases are excellent resources. The quality and currency of the data is as good as the commercial sites. The patent office databases are updated weekly and most of the independent databases (FreePatentsOnline, Patent Lens, etc.) are current or no more than a week behind. My favorite is the EPO’s esp@cenet system. It’s user friendly, has tremendous content (60 million patents from 72+ jurisdictions) and an excellent classification search tool. I understand that they will be rolling out major enhancements to it sometime this fall. You might be interested in a comparison of free patent databases I posted recently on my blog."

PUL’s Patent Resources guide is linkable from the "Articles and Databases" cluster, under "P" or "patent".  ("Articles and Databases") is on the Library’s homepage.

Mike also notes that Thomson Reuters is rumored to have a powerful new patent searching database coming — for professional patent searchers.