Sense About Science: Interpreting peer review to the public

 ”Sense About Science releases guide for public to comprehend peer review – 04 Mar 2013

Sense About Science, a partner of Taylor & Francis, has released a new guide to peer review to help the public make sense of research claims. The guide is titled I Don’t Know What to Believe: Making Sense of Science Stories.

The guide addresses questions such as how we can trust the claims made in the media about scientific studies; and how we can decipher false claims form the ones we can trust when a new drug appears or a study claims that we are at risk. It has been observed that understanding peer review and asking about the status of claims is important to society because it helps people make decisions.

The guide explains the peer review process – the system researchers use to assess the validity, significance and originality of papers. It captures experiences and insights from editors and scientists and encourages people to ask ‘Is it peer reviewed?’ when reading science and health stories.

Following the success of a UK peer review guide, Sense About Science has now created a US version providing the tools to talk directly to the public and how to address their issues.

Sense About Science is an international non-profit organisation that equips people to make sense of science and evidence on issues that matter to society. With a network of more than 5,000 scientists, the organisation works with scientific bodies, research publishers, policymakers, the public and the media to lead public discussions about science and evidence.”

Source:  Knowledgespeak Newsletter, 3/4/13

Link from Neil Nero:
http://www.senseaboutscience.org/resources.php/116/i-dont-know-what-to-believe-us-version

Public Reaction to Science Research @ FAS website

The FAS, the Federation of American Scientists has created a new tool to examine  Public Reaction to Science Research, on their website.  It will help to measure  public understanding of science and the importance of communicating science to the public.

"The module is the latest addition to the FAS Case Studies in Dual Use Biological Research multimedia online education material. The series illustrates the implications of dual-use biological research through case studies of researchers and provides a historical background on bioterrorism, bioweapons and the current laws, regulations and treaties that apply to biodefense research. Continuing development and expansion of the case studies is funded in part through a grant by the Carnegie Corporation of New York."

From Knowledgespeak Newsletter, Mar. 23, 2009.