UNESCO resource: World Library of Science

UNESCO Launches Online Science Education Resource

By Africa S. Hands

From UNESCO:

UNESCO launched the UNESCO World Library of Science (WLoS), a newly created, free online science education resource for a global community of users. Developed through the joint efforts of UNESCO, Nature Education and Roche, the WLoS was created to give students around the world, especially those in disadvantaged regions, access to the latest science information as well as the opportunity to share their experiences and learning through discussion with their peers in a shared learning environment.

Launched on the occasion of World Science Day for Peace and Development 2014, the WLoS is a science resource library stocked with over 300 top-quality articles, 25 eBooks, and over 70 videos from the publishers of Nature, the most cited scientific journal in the world. It is also a state-of-the-art digital platform that provides a community hub for learning. Users can join classes, build groups and connect with other learners.

UNESCO launched the UNESCO World Library of Science (WLoS), a newly created, free online science education resource for a global community of users. Developed through the joint efforts of UNESCO, Nature Education and Roche, the WLoS was created to give students around the world, especially those in disadvantaged regions, access to the latest science information as well as the opportunity to share their experiences and learning through discussion with their peers in a shared learning environment. – See more at: http://www.unesco.org/new/en/natural-sciences/about-us/single-view/news/unesco_partners_with_nature_education_and_roche_to_launch_the_world_library_of_science_a_free_online_science_education_resource/#.VHSNdclDXjV

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Source: [ResourceShelf] Newsletter 624, Dec. 9, 2014

HHMI Cool Science

 
www.hhmi.org/coolscience
  • 4 stars (excellent)
  • Beautifully designed site, content for many age groups
  • Limited resources for children

“Are you ready for some COOL SCIENCE? (Yeah, I thought so.) The Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Cool Science website is an entertaining and informative site that certainly lives up to its name and its mission of “sharing the facts and fun about science with all ages.” There really is something for everyone on this site. For instance, the “For Educators” page includes a number of teaching resources for all grade levels, from kindergarten to graduate education. These resources include books, animations, games and videos, among others. At the other end of the age spectrum, the “Curious Kids” page features a small number of activities that address such questions as “Why are snakes like lizards?” The “Becoming a Scientist” page includes interviews with a number of scientists who give their opinions regarding what it takes to succeed as a scientist, and the “Ask a Scientist” page gives site visitors the opportunity to have their own scientific questions answered.”

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“In each print issue of Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, our Best of the Web columnist Taralyn Tan reviews websites of interest. Taralyn Tan is a web-savvy graduate student in Harvard University’s program in neuroscience.”

*The opinions expressed are solely those of the author(s) and should not be construed as reflecting the viewpoints of the publisher, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., the publishing house, or employees and affiliates thereof.

The Nature of Science and the Scientific Method

The Nature of Science and the Scientific Method [pdf]

http://www.geosociety.org/educate/NatureOfScience.htm

For those who haven’t been in science class for some time, the scientific method may be a bit of a hazy memory. Those people (educators and others included) who need a bit of a refresher, along with a nice guide to talking about the scientific method, will find this resource from The Geological Society of America most efficacious. Authored by scientist Christine V. McLelland, this 9-page document “promotes understanding of the nature of science and how the scientific method is used to advance science, focusing in particular on the Earth sciences.” The document covers topics like “What is Science?” and breaks the scientific method down into its five primary parts. It also offers some brief talking points about the nature of science, and a nice bibliography.”

Source:  Scout Report, Univ. of Wisconsin, Apr. 13, 2012

Boosting STEM research, proposals by McGraw-Hill Research Foundation

McGraw-Hill Research Foundation releases paper on strategies to boost STEM research – 27 Sep 2011

The McGraw-Hill Research Foundation has released a new policy paper by Dr. Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, that seeks to offer practical and scalable solutions to the problem of inadequate supply of college graduates excelling in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Dr. Hrabowski is President of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). He says research in STEM is critical as the US addresses key challenges in healthcare, the environment, national security and the economy.

In the paper, Institutional Change in Higher Education: Innovation and Collaboration, Dr. Hrabowski discusses how his institution has addressed the shortage of STEM graduates, particularly among groups that have been underrepresented in these fields, including minorities, women and students from low-income backgrounds. UMBC has been recognised widely as a leader in higher education innovation, according to him. For three years in a row, the US News and World Report America’s Best Colleges Guide has ranked the university number one among ‘Up-and-Coming’ national universities.

To help meet the growing demand for STEM experts nationwide and encourage institutional change, Dr. Hrabowski urges colleges and universities to establish priorities, focus on strategic planning, and emphasise effectiveness and efficiency in the use of resources; reflect on their institution’s culture, taking into account school values, practices, habits and even the relationships among faculty, staff, and students; encourage the involvement of the entire campus, including faculty, administration, and students, in understanding and addressing broad retention issues and general academic performance; focus on the importance of group study and other approaches that inform redesign for first-year STEM courses; increase support for minority groups by providing knowledge and skill development, academic and social integration, support and motivation, and advising and monitoring; and develop distinct programmes and initiatives that address change needed in graduate programmes.

Dr. Hrabowski shows that the framework developed through the Meyerhoff Scholars Program underlies other important programmes and initiatives at UMBC that have helped create a campus climate of inclusive excellence. He will discuss the paper’s themes as a featured speaker at the third annual Innovation in Education Summit in New York City on September 28, 2011. Sponsored by The McGraw-Hill Research Foundation, the event brings together experts to discuss critical issues and trends and their impact on today’s education environment.”

Source: Knowledgespeak Newsletter

Distinctive Voices: lectures in Science & Technology at Irvine’s Beckman Center

“About Distinctive Voices  
Distinctive Voices highlights innovations, discoveries, and emerging issues in an exciting and engaging public forum. Do you wonder how things work? What the future holds? If you are curious about the science and technology behind today’s hot topics, Distinctive Voices is for you!
Distinctive Voices was created in 2006 as a program of the National Academy of Sciences Communication Initiative to increase science literacy. The live programming hosted at the Beckman Center in Irvine, CA received major funding from the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Fund of the National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering. Additional support is provided by The Edward Lifesciences Fund and Pacific Life Foundation. The program at the Jonsson Center in Woods Hole, MA is supported by the Frank Press Fund of The National Academy of Sciences, the Thomas Lincoln Casey Fund of The National Academy of Sciences, the Arthur L. Day Fund of The National Academy of Sciences, and the Kellogg Fund of the Institute of Medicine.”
From their homepage.  Check out the wealth of programs…mainly ~1 hour in duration.

“Change the Equation” new government mandated non-profit led by CEOs to improve STEM education

White House Announces Launch of New Nonprofit to Strengthen STEM Education
The President at MLK Charter School in New Orleans, White House Photo, Pete Souza, 11/15/09.

The Obama administration announced today the launch of “Change the Equation,” a new nonprofit corporation led by CEOs in an effort to improve education in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). According to the White House, the initiative is a response to the president’s speech at the National Academy of Sciences in April 2009 in which he urged Americans to elevate STEM education as a national priority. The National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and National Research Council have a long history of efforts to improve STEM education, including the influential 2005 report Rising Above the Gathering Storm: Energizing and Employing America for a Brighter Economic Future, which urged improvements in K-12 STEM education to keep the U.S. economically competitive.

Scitopia now with streamlined links to RefWorks

"Federated search services provider Deep Web Technologies, US, has announced that its federated search product, Explorit Research Accelerator, now includes seamless integration with RefWorks, a web-based solution for citations management."

source: Knowledgespeak Newsletter, July 30, 2009

Scitopia was developed by 21 top technological and scientific societies.  It is a freely available database mainly in physics and engineering.  Component societies are listed on a webpage off www.scitopia.org.  It lists papers going back as early as 1665, some of which are digitized.

Full text is offered on a pay-per-view basis, so currently it is better to search Princeton’s subscription databases which have links to our full-text subscription resources.  INSPEC  and Compendex  cover even more resources than Scitopia.  IEEE  — Xplore & IEL — are other overlapping subscription databases we have, and they are completely full-text.

Science — the “Moon Issue” — January 30, 1970

In commemoration of the 40th anniversary of the "moon walk", AAAS and Science has made this issue available to everyone.  Princeton University has had access via JSTOR for some time:  http://www.jstor.org/stable/i299517

At the AAAS link, you’ll see the link to the special "Moon issue"