SCOPUS launches iPhone app — as of May 12th

Today SCOPUS has launched their new mobile application for the iPhone.  If you have an iPhone, and since Princeton subscribes to SCOPUS, you are free to download it.

SCOPUS webpage announcement:

http://mail.elsevier-alerts.com/go.asp?/bESC001/mSR4081F/uDF5Q4/xWHWI81F

SCOPUS — large Science, Technology & Medicine subscription database from Elsevier, 1996+

Citation alerts for authors

Elsevier is now offering an automatic, free service to authors:  By publishing in an Elsevier journal, the author will be notified, when his/her article has been cited when the citing articles have been indexed in Scopus. (Self-citations are not included.)

The service is called CiteAlert.  Here is the press release:  http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/authored_newsitem.cws_home/companynews05_01115

A broader, similar service is been available to all Scopus subscribers, of which Princeton is one.  On every page that displays an article’s bibliographic data and abstract, there is a link at the right that allows for subscribing to a citation alert.

Notice came via Knowledgespeak Newsletter, Jan. 30, 2009.

Scopus adds pre-print research abstracts from publishers

"Netherland Scopus adds pre-print research abstracts from publishers29 Jul 2008

Abstracting and indexing database Scopus, part of STM publisher Elsevier, Netherlands, has announced that it has added ‘Articles-in-Press’ (AiP), abstracts of accepted research papers published prior to being printed, from journals produced by Karger Medical and Scientific Publishers, and Nature Publishing Group (NPG). Later this year, AiPs from BioMed Central and IEEE will also be available. Scopus previously offered access to AiPs from Elsevier and Springer that included 2500 titles. This number will now rise to about 3000.

Scopus AiP abstracts are citable and precede the final published, printed version by up-to-four months, significantly accelerating the knowledge discovery process for researchers. Researchers will gain access to the full-text by linking from Scopus to the publishers’ digital library. This early access provides greater connectivity to the current state of research in a range of fields, as well as a more timely method for evaluating the output of authors and institutions.

Since AiPs are posted online either as an accepted manuscript or online publication (according to each publisher’s release policy), they may still be subject to changes and/or corrections by the author or publisher. Scopus clearly labels AiPs as such so researchers are aware that an updated abstract will be made available once the papers are in print."
 

Source:  Knowledgespeak Newsletter, July 29th.