Scopus has added 5 million pre-1996 articles and over 93 million references

“Scopus has added 5 million pre-1996 articles and over 93 million references – and we’re not even half-way

on Thu, 11/26/2015 – 16:06

As of this week, Scopus has added 5 million pre-1996 records including over 93 million references to the database. This has been done in two ways: by adding pre-1996 cited references to existing articles in Scopus and by adding article back files, including their cited references, coming from archives from various publishers, going back to 1970.

This milestone is the result of the ongoing Scopus Cited Reference Expansion Program initiated in March 2014 that aims to include cited references in Scopus going back to 1970 for pre-1996 content. The goal of this expansion program is to further enhance the ability for Scopus users to perform long-term, extensive bibliometric and historic trend analyses – and to enhance and further complete the h-index for researchers who published pre-1996.

Archives already completed include the following publishers: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). American Physical Society (APS), Karger Publishers, Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC), Springer, American Medical Association (AMA), Inderscience and Elsevier.

Additional archives currently in process include: Wiley Blackwell, BioMedCentral (BMC), Taylor & Francis, Oxford University Press, Society of Automotive Engineers International, (SAE), Walter de Gruyter, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), Institute of Physics (IoP), Brill Publishers, Sage, Emerald Group Publishing, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and the American Geophysical Union (AGU).

We will keep you updated on the progress of this Expansion Program, and make sure to follow this blog or our Twitter account to stay up to date.”

Release Date:
November 26 2015

SCOPUS reviewed in Choice, January, 2015

Scopus. Elsevier.

A very complimentary review by –J. N. Jeffryes, University of Minnesota

“Scopus’s nearest competitor is Web of Science (CH, Jan’11, 48-2436), and the two tools remain somewhat complementary.  For post-1996 information, Scopus comes off as the more impressive of the two with its advanced citation analysis visualizations, wider inclusion of conference papers, and adoption of alternative impact metrics.  Because the citation counts and h index calculations go back only to 1996, Web of Science has the historical edge.  In the areas of interface design and record readability, Scopus is the stronger tool.  It provides an intuitive search format to explore an impressively broad base of research; if the depth of coverage were expanded (or as 1996 becomes more distant), this tool would become even more valuable.  Even as it is today, it is a very valuable resource for academic and professional libraries. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above”

The complete review is here:



SCOPUS launches iPhone app — as of May 12th

Today SCOPUS has launched their new mobile application for the iPhone.  If you have an iPhone, and since Princeton subscribes to SCOPUS, you are free to download it.

SCOPUS webpage announcement:

SCOPUS — large Science, Technology & Medicine subscription database from Elsevier, 1996+

Citation alerts for authors

Elsevier is now offering an automatic, free service to authors:  By publishing in an Elsevier journal, the author will be notified, when his/her article has been cited when the citing articles have been indexed in Scopus. (Self-citations are not included.)

The service is called CiteAlert.  Here is the press release:

A broader, similar service is been available to all Scopus subscribers, of which Princeton is one.  On every page that displays an article’s bibliographic data and abstract, there is a link at the right that allows for subscribing to a citation alert.

Notice came via Knowledgespeak Newsletter, Jan. 30, 2009.

Scopus adds pre-print research abstracts from publishers

"Netherland Scopus adds pre-print research abstracts from publishers29 Jul 2008

Abstracting and indexing database Scopus, part of STM publisher Elsevier, Netherlands, has announced that it has added ‘Articles-in-Press’ (AiP), abstracts of accepted research papers published prior to being printed, from journals produced by Karger Medical and Scientific Publishers, and Nature Publishing Group (NPG). Later this year, AiPs from BioMed Central and IEEE will also be available. Scopus previously offered access to AiPs from Elsevier and Springer that included 2500 titles. This number will now rise to about 3000.

Scopus AiP abstracts are citable and precede the final published, printed version by up-to-four months, significantly accelerating the knowledge discovery process for researchers. Researchers will gain access to the full-text by linking from Scopus to the publishers’ digital library. This early access provides greater connectivity to the current state of research in a range of fields, as well as a more timely method for evaluating the output of authors and institutions.

Since AiPs are posted online either as an accepted manuscript or online publication (according to each publisher’s release policy), they may still be subject to changes and/or corrections by the author or publisher. Scopus clearly labels AiPs as such so researchers are aware that an updated abstract will be made available once the papers are in print."

Source:  Knowledgespeak Newsletter, July 29th.