Author Archives: Hillary Dodyk

Men’s Soccer Tries To Regain Home Field Advantage

Home field advantage is an expression for a reason—familiar turf comes with knowledge, comfort, and an atmosphere of success. At least it’s supposed to. But for Princeton men’s soccer, the pressure of playing on the road, away from the supposed advantages of home, has brought them more victories this season.

Cameron Porter ’15 (Office of Athletic Communications)

Cameron Porter ’15 (Office of Athletic Communications)

A tough 2-1 overtime loss to Dartmouth on Saturday was the Tigers’ second loss at Roberts Stadium this season, bringing their home record to 1-2-1, while their away record sits at 2-1-1. The loss to Dartmouth also was the Tigers’ first Ivy League match of the season.

“It’s a tough loss because when you look at the teams who end up winning the Ivy League and getting the bid into the [NCAA] tournament it generally takes six wins, and so losing your first game means you have a lot to do,” senior forward and co-captain Cameron Porter said. “Going into the rest of the season it really puts the pressure on you because its also kind of out of your hands. Dartmouth is a good team, [so if] they go win out, you’re kind of out of luck no matter what.” Continue reading

Defensive Lineman Reid ’14 Prepares for the NFL Draft (and Sings Sam Cooke)

Caraun Reid ’14, left, made an impression on Ivy League quarterbacks. He’s hoping to do the same in the NFL. (Beverly Schaefer)

Caraun Reid ’14, left, made an impression on Ivy League quarterbacks. He hopes to do the same in the NFL. (Beverly Schaefer)

Always respected by the football community for his skills, defensive lineman Caraun Reid ’14 has used his fifth year as a Tiger to develop as a vocal leader on and off the field, as well as thrive as a leader among the campus Christian and arts communities. Known for his faith and his singing voice (see below) in addition to his ability to put pressure on the quarterback, the pro-football hopeful will be waiting to hear his name called during this week’s NFL draft, which begins May 8.

Reid credits his work ethic for allowing him the opportunity to take on his initial leadership role on the football team; those leadership responsibilities, he said, were heightened over the past year.

“I definitely stepped up more in terms of vocal leadership.  Granted I was one of the better players on the team so everyone always saw my work ethic and being able to make plays on the field as leadership, but I took more responsibility over the lives of my teammates and how they developed,” Reid said.  “I think more and more it just drove me to work harder knowing, if I’m doing a lot of talking then I have to be at the level where no one can question my work ethic. … That’s what I want to bring to the pros, just being one of those guys that always stands out, on and off the field.” Continue reading

Men’s Golf Falls Short in Bid to Win Home Tourney

Yale had taken home the title from the Princeton Invitational in four consecutive years, but this year, that streak came to an end as another Ivy rival, Harvard, finished three shots ahead of the Bulldogs to claim the top spot.  Meanwhile, the host Tigers ended the weekend ninth out of the 15 teams in the three-round event at Springdale Golf Club.

Greg Jarmas ’14 (Office of Athletic Communications)

Greg Jarmas ’14 (Office of Athletic Communications)

Led by senior Greg Jarmas, the Tigers completed round one on Saturday with Jarmas and senior Nick Ricci sitting among the top 15 in the standings.  Jarmas would cut four shots off of his first-round score to shoot a 66 in the second round on Saturday, tying for the lowest score of the day and placing him in a tie for second place and three shots back of the lead going into Sunday’s final round. He would ultimately finish 12th.

“The difference between who moves up and who moves back in a tight race almost always comes down to putting, especially at Springdale,” Jarmas said.  “The guys who make just a couple more makeable putts will come out on top.”

Jarmas was named All-Ivy League in 2013 after becoming Princeton’s first Ivy individual champion since 2005.  Jarmas also was the Tigers’ highest finisher at NCAA Regionals. The Princeton Invitational was the first — and only — home event of the spring for men’s golf. Continue reading

Women’s Water Polo Continues Success in California

Ashleigh Johnson ’16 (Office of Athletic Communications)

Ashleigh Johnson ’16 (Office of Athletic Communications)

Katie Rigler ’14 (Office of Athletic Communications)

Katie Rigler ’14 (Office of Athletic Communications)

For most teams, a trip to California would be a trip across the country to train, compete, and bond with teammates, but for many on the women’s water polo team, it is also a trip home.  With a schedule that affords them only six home games at DeNunzio Pool all season, the trip provides an additional opportunity for friends and family of 11 of the 15 women to see them play.

“We are luckily to get to stay with teammates’ families while we are in California,” junior Kelly Gross said of the visit home.  “It’s really nice to be in a home instead of a hotel for the whole week and get some home-cooked meals, too. My mom even brought our new puppy to our tournament, which was definitely a highlight!”

The two-time reigning CWPA champion Tigers continued what has been a strong start to their season as they headed to the West Coast on an eight game trip that left them with a 21-1 mark and a six-game winning streak.  The Tigers started off the week with a triple-overtime 14-13 win over No. 13 UC San Diego, but lost 10-6 the next day to No. 14 San Jose State, giving them their first loss of the season.  However, they would win the remaining six games of the trip, including a decisive 9-3 victory over No. 8 Loyola Marymount during the second weekend. Continue reading

Princeton Men’s Basketball Falls to Harvard Despite Freshmen’s Best Efforts

T.J. Bray '14 led Princeton with 17 points in his final game against Harvard. The Tigers' freshmen combined to score 25 points in the 59-47 loss. (Photo: Beverly Schaefer)

T.J. Bray ’14 led Princeton with 17 points in his final game against Harvard. The Tigers’ freshmen combined to score 25 points in the 59-47 loss. (Photo: Beverly Schaefer)

While individually none of them led the scoring for Princeton, collectively the men’s basketball freshmen accounted for more than half of the offensive production in the Tigers’ 59-47 loss to Harvard on Saturday night, a positive sign in an otherwise disappointing Ivy League season. Princeton, which was 12-2 in nonconference play, dropped to 3-6 in Ivy games.

The Harvard loss was a classic tale of two halves, as the Tigers won the first half but ultimately could not compete following halftime and fell to the Crimson in their home gym for the first time since 1989.

Senior guard T.J. Bray is had another big game offensively (17 points), which has become the norm — he has scored in double figures 17 times in 19 games played. But the freshmen also played key roles in the most anticipated match up on Princeton’s schedule.

The home Harvard game has consistently attracted more fans than any other for the past several years, and Saturday night was no different. “They’re always great for this game,” Bray said. “They really get up for it.”

Despite Princeton’s 3-5 Ivy record coming into the game, tip off saw a packed student section and the Tigers gave the fans a much closer than anticipated competition, coming out stronger than they have in previous games and opening up a 12-point lead midway through the first half. After closing out the half with a buzzer beater from freshman forward Spencer Weisz, the Tigers went into the locker room with a 29-24 lead.

But in contrast to the first half, they came out slow in the second half and watched the lead they had built up slowly start to slip away. After Hans Brase ’16 missed a dunk attempt with 8 minutes left that would have reclaimed the lead for the Tigers, Harvard opened up a 44-40 lead, made a defensive stop and another field goal, squelching the Tigers’ momentum. Continue reading

Men’s Swimming Splits H-Y-P Meet, Eyes Ivy Rematch

With Ivy League Championships less than a month away, the Princeton swimming and diving teams began the final stretch of their season, traveling to New Haven for the annual Harvard-Yale-Princeton weekend. The men began the weekend on Saturday, placing second in the meet with a 213-140 loss to Harvard and a 194-159 win over Yale. The women took their turn in the rivalry on Sunday, coming in second with a 189-111 loss to Harvard and a 171-129 win over Yale.

23520-maher_hed_OAC-thumb-160x240-23519.jpg
Connor Maher ’15 (Photo: Office of Athletic Communications)

Front and center for the Tiger men’s hopes during the annual classic were juniors Michael Strand and Connor Maher, reigning Ivy League champions in the 100-yard and 200-yard backstroke, respectively. The 100 back proved to be the Tigers’ most successful event, as the Tigers claimed the top three spots. However, Strand finished second in the event with a time of 48.51. He was beaten by teammate and sophomore En-Wei Hu-Van Wright, who won the event with a time of 48.21, giving the Tigers their only first place finish in the 19-event meet; Maher finished third in the sprint event with a time of 48.53. 

“The 100 back has been a very strong event for us in the past and being able to finish 1-2-3 in such an early event was huge momentum swing,” Maher said. “The race strategies are very different [swimming the 100 and the 200]. The 200 you definitely have to strategize more about how hard you are going to go, but the 100 is much more of a dead sprint from the beginning.”

Despite strong swims throughout the meet, the Tigers were unable to capture any additional first place finishes. Maher led off the 200-yard freestyle relay team that ultimately finished in second place with a time of 1.19.86, less than a second off of the winning time from Harvard’s top finisher. He was followed by junior Harrison Wagner, freshman Julian Mackrel, and sophomore Jeremy Wong.

Continue reading