Category Archives: Campus News

Bock GS Curates Flash Photography Exhibition

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Amanda Bock GS


The Showing: “Artificial Light: Flash Photography in the Twentieth Century,” an exhibit curated by Amanda Bock GS.
Dates and Location: May 24 – Aug. 3, 2014, at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Main Building, the Lynne and Harold Honickman Gallery. The gallery is open Tuesday through Sunday, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., and until 8:45 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays.

The Curator: Bock was a Goldsmiths Fellow at the Philadelphia Museum of Art for three years and today is project assistant curator in the department of prints, drawings, and photographs. She also is a Ph.D. student at Princeton working on her dissertation in art history. Continue reading

Summer Strings: Physicists Debate Theories, Evidence at Annual Conference

By Mark Alpert ’82

Where do scientists go on their summer vacations? While many fled to the beach or some other getaway last month, several hundred physicists came to Princeton to discuss string theory, which is a topic you won’t find on most beach-reading lists. For the five days of Strings 2014, the latest in a series of annual conferences, the theorists eschewed sun and sand in favor of exploring the weightiest of questions: Can we construct a mathematical framework that explains the fundamental nature of the universe?

Participants at the Strings 2014 conference. (Amaris Hardy, Office of Communications)

Participants at the Strings 2014 conference. (Amaris Hardy, Office of Communications)

Princeton was the perfect venue for this year’s conference because so many string theorists work in the University’s physics department and at the Institute for Advanced Study. “No other institution is as closely associated with string theory,” said Nima Arkani-Hamed, a physicist at the Institute (and one of the stars of the recent documentary Particle Fever). “Princeton was the incubator for the field for many years.” Continue reading

For Some Tech-Minded Students, Startups Provide an Alternative Path

Today’s exploding tech industry, with its 20-something-year-old CEOs and millionaire college dropouts, thrives on a philosophy of learning from real-world successes and failures, not textbooks. This raises an important question: Is an undergraduate degree necessary for professional success?

Even at Princeton, some students are itching to ditch coursework for hands-on work experience. Just ask Alice Zheng, originally a computer science major in the Class of 2013, who is taking time off to work at The Dentboard, a Princeton-based start-up.

“The way I see it, Princeton will always be waiting for me, and I have opportunities in front of me now that I want to grasp while I can,” Zheng said.

Those opportunities include working for a company that, according to Dentboard founder Caleb Bastian, plans to offer “a new IT infrastructure for the entire dental industry.” That goal is ambitious for a company with five employees, three of whom are Princeton undergraduates taking time off from school. Continue reading

Princeton Students Create Climate-Themed Hackathon in the Philippines

Participants gathered for a photo after the Hack the Climate awards ceremony. (Courtesy Hack the Climate, Manila/Elaine Cedillo)

Participants gathered for a photo after the Hack the Climate awards ceremony. (Courtesy Hack the Climate, Manila/Elaine Cedillo)

When Princeton students Michael Lachanski ’15 and Jacob Scheer ’15 began planning an international hackathon to address climate change, the Philippines seemed like a natural host site. The country has exceptional biodiversity as well as vulnerability to weather events related to climate change. And its capital, Manila, is home to a budding tech community.

Lachanski and Scheer made their pitch to the Pace Center for Civic Engagement and earned a grant from the Center’s Davis Projects for Peace. In late May, after finishing their exams, the two flew to Manila to finish their planning. Last week, in a 60-hour marathon competition held at Manila’s De La Salle-College of Saint Benilde, teams of computer programmers used their skills to build a range of new applications. Continue reading

Introducing PAW’s 2014 Reunions Guide

Click on the cover to download a PDF of the 2014 Reunions Guide. (Illustration by Michael Witte ’66)

Click on the cover to download a PDF of the 2014 Reunions Guide. (Illustration by Michael Witte ’66)

PAW’s 2014 Reunions Guide will be available at all class registration sites and selected locations on campus. It features plans for the major-reunion classes, news about art exhibitions, interviews with Teach For America founder Wendy Kopp ’89 and rising opera star Anthony Roth Costanzo ’04, and more.

To download a PDF of the guide, click on the cover photo.

As 75th Anniversary Approaches, WPRB Collects Station Memorabilia

H. Grant Theis ’42, founder of WPRU, which later became WPRB. (PAW Archives, Feb. 24, 1941)

H. Grant Theis ’42, founder of WPRU, which later became WPRB. (PAW Archives, Feb. 24, 1941)

From its first broadcast in 1940, in the Pyne Hall dorm room of an ambitious and tech-savvy undergrad, to its current incarnation as a leading regional music source for indie rock, classical, jazz, and more, WPRB has followed a remarkable path.

As the station approaches its 75th anniversary, former DJ and station manager Dipika Sen ’13 is leading a push to collect pieces of WPRB history for display in a 2015 exhibition. The station will kick off its 75th-anniversary efforts at Reunions with a reception May 31 at 4:15 p.m. in its home in Bloomberg Hall (near the P-rade’s terminus). Sen and her colleagues are asking for alumni to lend or donate “relics from WPRB’s illustrious past” — T-shirts, photos, listener letters, and audio content. (Those who are not returning for Reunions can learn more about submitting memorabilia online.)

“It’s a perfect opportunity to see how the station has evolved,” Sen said. “We’ve had an enthusiastic response from alumni so far.”

READ MORE: A WPRB timeline, from the Dec. 8, 2010, issue of PAW