Tag Archives: Princeton lacrosse

NCAA hopes on the line for Princeton men’s lacrosse at Ivy Tournament

i-09592708dd26a71c33a7b633249582ca-ivy_logo.jpg
By David Marcus ’92
 
The Princeton men’s lacrosse team has a challenging though unclear mission this weekend. If the Tigers are to go to the NCAA Tournament, they’ll at a minimum need to beat Cornell at 8 p.m. Friday in Ithaca, N.Y., in the semifinals of the Ivy League Tournament. Depending on what happens in the other six conference tournaments this weekend, Princeton may well need to win its own, which would entail a win over Cornell and a victory over either Yale or Penn in the Ivy final, which is slated for Sunday at 11 a.m. The Ivy Tournament winner gets an automatic bid to the NCAAs.

“We’re going into this weekend thinking we have to win two games,” said Chris Bates, Princeton’s head coach.

The Tigers went 8-5 this year, including wins over Johns Hopkins and Yale, but they dropped one-goal games to North Carolina, Penn, Syracuse, and Dartmouth before suffering a 17-11 loss to Cornell at MetLife Stadium April 27. Princeton has struggled defensively all year, allowing an average of 9.7 goals a game, and Bates replaced goalie Matt O’Connor ’16, who started the first 11 games of the year, with Eric Sanschagrin ’15 against Harvard on April 19. Sanschagrin played well against the Crimson, making 8 saves in a 14-6 win, and respectably against Cornell with 12 saves.

Despite performing in front of 19,875 people in an NFL Stadium, “Eric was very poised,” against Cornell, Bates said. “The shots he gave up were in tight. We thought he played fine.”

Princeton’s normally potent offense sputtered in the first half against Cornell before scoring eight goals in the second half. They’ll need that kind of production for a full 60 minutes to beat the Big Red, which pelted Princeton with shots from close range. Cornell’s Rob Pannell may be the best attackman in the college game, and he scored five goals and four assists on Saturday in a dominating performance. Cornell attackman Steve Mock and midfielder Connor Buczek each added four goals as the team upped its record to 12-2 and 6-0 in the Ivy League.

Continue reading

Ivy League Tournament preview: Princeton aims for automatic bid

Tournament schedule

Friday, May 4
Yale vs. Cornell, 5 p.m.
Brown at Princeton,
8 p.m.

Sunday, May 6
Championship, noon

TV: Semifinals – ESPN3, Championship – ESPNU

By David Marcus ’92
 
The men’s lacrosse team won the Ivy League championship on Saturday with a 14-9 win over Cornell, but Princeton may have to beat the Big Red again in this weekend’s Ivy League tournament to go to the NCAA playoffs. The victory gave Princeton its first undefeated Ivy campaign since 2001, when the Tigers went on to win the national title, and it broke a streak of nine straight years in which Cornell had either won or shared the crown. It also means Princeton will host the Ivy tournament this weekend.
 
The Ivy League likely will get only one NCAA bid this year, and it will go to the winner of this weekend’s tournament. “We feel that we need to win Friday and Sunday to ensure our spot” in the NCAAs, said Princeton head coach Chris Bates. 
 
Princeton beat Brown 13-2 on March 31 in Providence, a game in which Princeton goalie Tyler Fiorito ’12 made 16 saves while his Brown counterpart Will Round recorded only four. Bates says that the Bears are a “different and better team” than they were a month ago.
 

Continue reading

In another big game, women’s lacrosse tops the Big Green

i-fdd10fbe8d95f51ecc8678d3ce02d745-mcmunn.jpg i-d03385c08a8fc493596dd708308afa65-woehling.jpg
Freshmen Erin McMunn, left, and Annie Woehling played key roles in Princeton’s 12-9 win over Dartmouth. (Photos: Courtesy Athletic Communications)
The women’s lacrosse team has had its share of highs and lows in recent seasons. But the Tigers certainly do not back down from pressure – in several must-win situations over the last three years, Princeton has played its best games.
 
Entering the final game of the 2010 regular season, the Tigers had lost three straight games by a combined 16 goals, but they beat Dartmouth – which was ranked in the top 10 nationally – in overtime to qualify for the inaugural Ivy League Tournament. Last season, Princeton toppled Penn in Philadelphia before beating Harvard to win the conference tournament, snatching the automatic bid for NCAAs; the Tigers then extended their season once more with an 11-10 victory over James Madison in the first round.
 
And on Saturday, when a loss would have knocked Princeton out of postseason contention, the Tigers handed No. 8 Dartmouth its first Ivy League loss of the season with a 12-9 victory at Class of 1952 Stadium.
 
“We knew we had to win this game … but the one thing we didn’t want to do was to come in thinking that we had to win and focusing on the negative aspects of it,” said midfielder Cassie Pyle ’12, who scored four goals. “We wanted to think of how big an opportunity it was for us. I think that mindset was really what kept us so calm throughout the game.”
 

Continue reading

As Fiorito ’12 returns to form, men’s lacrosse follows

15696-fiorito-thumb-160x240-15695.jpg
Tyler Fiorito ’12 (Photo: Courtesy Athletic Communications)
By David Marcus ’92
 
Tyler Fiorito ’12 has been one of the best lacrosse goalies in the country since his freshman year, but he got off to a rocky start this season. He was shaky in a 10-8 loss to Johns Hopkins March 2, then missed Princeton’s 13-7 win over Manhattan because he violated an unspecified team rule – the first game in Fiorito’s Princeton career that he hasn’t started – and made only two saves in a 9-8 loss to the University of North Carolina at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore March 10.
 
Fiorito returned to form in a 14-8 win at Villanova on March 14 and an 11-4 victory over Penn four days later that left Princeton with a 4-2 record and a No. 13 ranking. He made 11 saves against the Wildcats and seven more against the Quakers. He also played well outside the cage by picking up several loose balls against Penn and making good decisions when clearing the ball. That’s encouraging news for Princeton, whose offense is good enough to compete with any team in the country if Fiorito and his defense are on their game.
 
The centerpiece of that offense is Tom Schreiber ’14, who generates more points per possession than any player in college lacrosse, according to one Web commentator. And that analysis came just after the UNC game, when Schreiber didn’t score on any of his seven shots, though he did notch three assists. Attackman Jeff Froccaro ’13 also shot 0-for-7 against UNC, whose goalie, Steven Rastivo, turned in his best effort of the year with 16 saves.
 

Continue reading

Men’s lacrosse struggles in close loss to No. 2 Johns Hopkins

15378-shreiber-thumb-160x240-15377.jpg
Tom Schreiber ’14 (Photo: Courtesy Athletic Communications)
By David Marcus ’92
 
The Princeton men’s lacrosse team fell to 2-1 with a 10-8 loss on March 2 to Johns Hopkins, currently the second-ranked team in the country, but the Tigers’ first three games suggest that they’re primed to overcome the offensive difficulties that plagued them last year in a difficult 4-8 season.
 
In 2011, the lone bright spot on an offense that averaged only 7.1 goals a game (55th among the 61 schools that play Division I lacrosse), was midfielder Tom Schreiber ’14, the Ivy League Rookie of the Year and Princeton’s leader in goals and assists. Schreiber is an exceptionally gifted passer, and head coach Chris Bates has made him the centerpiece of this year’s offense. Bates tries to keep him on the field as much as possible by playing him at attack rather than midfield.
 
Schreiber rewarded that confidence Feb. 25 with four goals and three assists in a 12-6 season-opening win over Hofstra. He added four more goals and an assist in a 13-7 win over Manhattan three days later. But Johns Hopkins defenseman Tucker Durkin, like Schreiber a preseason first-team All-American, held him to a goal and two assists.

Continue reading

Princeton women’s lacrosse falls to No. 1 Maryland in NCAA Tournament

By Jakob Engelke
 
COLLEGE PARK, Md.In the early minutes of Saturday’s NCAA Tournament quarterfinal matchup against top-seeded Maryland, the Princeton women’s lacrosse team seemed primed to pull off an improbable upset.
 
11006-pyle-thumb-140x210-11005.jpg
Cassie Pyle ’12 (Office of Athletic Communications)

The Tigers controlled possession early and with two quick goals from midfielder Cassie Pyle ’12 and one from attacker Jaci Gassaway ’13, Princeton found itself owning a 3-1 lead with 14:40 remaining in the first half.

 
But it was only a matter of time before Maryland’s offense, which averaged 15 goals per game heading into the contest, came to life.
 
After the No. 12 Tigers’ initial outburst, the No. 1 Terrapins went on to score seven unanswered goals and took a four-score lead into halftime en route to a dominant 15-6 victory at Maryland’s Field Hockey and Lacrosse Complex.
 
“We started out the game strong and feeling good,” Princeton head coach Chris Sailer said. “We were really giving them some difficulties with our one-on-ones, but Maryland’s a great team and they went on their runs. We never recovered from that.”
 
After Princeton took its early two-goal lead, Maryland head coach Cathy Reese called a timeout to settle down her players. The move worked to perfection, as the Terrapins outscored Princeton, 14-3, in the remaining 44 minutes of action.
 

Continue reading

Q&A with ‘Top Model’ contestant Jane Randall ’12

i-60b7d62ee38ec3d35c3748e31c3c5161-randall.jpg
Jane Randall ’12 (© Mathieu Young/The CW)
For many Princeton students, summer break is a great time to travel abroad, intern with a congressman, or work on particle accelerators in a lab. Jane Randall ’12, however, spent her summer quite differently: on reality TV. The lean 5-foot-9-inch history major and former varsity lacrosse player appears this month on Cycle 15 of America’s Next Top Model (ANTM), a reality show aimed at giving women a chance to start their career in the modeling industry. Randall, who plans to take a semester off to pursue modeling, spoke with The Weekly Blog’s Tara Thean ’13.
 
Why did you decide to audition for the show?
 
I was looking into modeling – I sent my picture to a couple of agencies. Then I was watching Gossip Girl and a little thing popped up about how to audition [for ANTM], so I sent in a picture I had taken in my dorm room.
 
Can you remember the moment when you got in?
 
I was really excited when I found out I got in, but it was during finals. Right after I made the show I had to go for a photo shoot in Los Angeles. [Deputy registrar] Robert Bromfield told me that the show’s auditions did not count as an excuse to miss finals, so I got really lucky that I finished all my papers. After the shoot, I went back to Princeton and took a history final at 9 a.m.
 
Was the show what you expected?
 
I can never look at reality TV the same way again. Just from knowing how the cameramen tell people to move around, how things can be edited to project any storyline … it’s definitely been frustrating, but it’s exciting to watch. Everything goes by very fast – it’s one of the most physically, immensely exhausting experiences ever. I took the rest of the summer off.
 

Continue reading

Sports shorts: International Tigers

i-045d2aae128aba9c24e80befc43639d5-striebel_matt.jpg i-9797e774db92bc56f46b8f78e5bee0be-boyle_ryan.jpg

Matt Striebel ’01, left, and Ryan Boyle ’04 (Photos courtesy U.S. Lacrosse)

MEN’S LACROSSE alumni Matt Striebel ’01 and Ryan Boyle ’04 are aiming to recapture the championship for the United States at the 2010 World Lacrosse Championships, beginning July 16 in Manchester, England. [US Lacrosse]

Todd Harrity ’12, the 2010 Ivy League Rookie of the Year in MEN’S SQUASH, won a bronze medal at the 2010 World University Games in Melbourne, Australia, July 13. Harrity lost to German Jens Schoor in the semifinals but topped Leo Au of Hong Kong in the third-place match. [College Squash Association]

Donn Cabral ’12 of the MEN’S TRACK AND FIELD team won the 3,000-meter steeplechase at the North America, Central America, and Caribbean Under-23 Championships in Miramar, Fla., July 10. Team USA dominated the medal count, earning more medals than the other 11 competing nations combined. [USA Track and Field]

Continue reading

Ivy League men’s lacrosse tournament preview

i-c20bdc730242183fa1a93fdbeec5f574-mlaxtourn.jpg

If there was any doubt about the parity and competitiveness of Ivy League men’s lacrosse, that was put to rest May 1. Each of the league’s three final games was decided by one goal, and when the dust settled, four teams were locked in a tie for first place — the first four-way championship tie in Ivy men’s lacrosse history.

While all four teams — Princeton, Brown, Cornell, and Yale — have earned the right to call themselves champions, only one will get the league’s automatic bid to the NCAA Championships. And, thanks to the new Ivy League tournament, the winner will be settled at Cornell’s Schoellkopf Field. No. 2 seed Princeton takes on No. 3 seed Yale May 7 at 5 p.m., and No. 1 seed Cornell plays No. 4 seed Brown at 8 p.m. The championship, to be televised on ESPNU, will be played May 9 at noon. Below, PAW provides brief sketches of the four champions.

2. Princeton (9-4, 4-2 Ivy)

National rank: No. 8 (Inside Lacrosse), No. 9 (USILA)

Top scorers: Jack McBride ’11 (27 goals, 12 assists), Mike Chanenchuk ’13 (27 goals, eight assists), Rob Engelke ’10 (12 goals, 19 assists), Chris McBride ’11 (15 goals, six assists), Jeff Froccaro ’13 (15 goals, six assists)

In net: Tyler Fiorito ’12 (8.8 goals-against average, 140 saves)

Latest news: After back-to-back losses to finish the Ivy season (at Harvard and vs. Cornell), the Tigers enter the tournament with something to prove. Princeton, which started the year with impressive wins against Hofstra and Johns Hopkins, has not beaten a ranked opponent since April 3.

Continue reading

How to confuse a lacrosse fan

As GoPrincetonTigers.com explained in a detailed post April 25, there are three games remaining in the Ivy League men’s lacrosse season, and each one will help to determine who plays in the league’s first postseason tournament May 7 and 9. Princeton (9-3, 4-1 Ivy) has clinched its spot in the tournament, and the Tigers will host the event if they can beat Cornell May 1. But Princeton’s first-round opponent is still an open question. Thanks to a remarkably competitive league season, tiebreakers will be needed to determine the four tournament teams and their seeds. Below, the eight Ivy tournament scenarios.

Princeton beats Cornell

Harvard beats Yale

Dartmouth beats Brown

i-1876ff48a33e08c10b13f314c4bca22a-arrow.jpg

Ivy tournament:

1. Princeton vs. 4.
Dartmouth

2. Harvard vs. 3.
Yale

Princeton beats Cornell

Harvard beats Yale

Brown beats Dartmouth

i-1876ff48a33e08c10b13f314c4bca22a-arrow.jpg

Ivy tournament:

1. Princeton vs. 4.
Harvard

2. Brown vs. 3.
Cornell

Princeton beats Cornell

Yale beats Harvard

Brown beats Dartmouth

i-1876ff48a33e08c10b13f314c4bca22a-arrow.jpg

Ivy tournament:

1. Princeton vs. 4.
Cornell

2. Yale vs. 3.
Brown

Princeton beats Cornell

Yale beats Harvard

Dartmouth beats Brown

i-1876ff48a33e08c10b13f314c4bca22a-arrow.jpg

Ivy tournament:

1. Princeton vs. 4.
Brown

2. Yale vs. 3.
Dartmouth

Cornell beats Princeton

Harvard beats Yale

Dartmouth beats Brown

i-1876ff48a33e08c10b13f314c4bca22a-arrow.jpg

Ivy tournament:

1. Cornell vs. 4.
Yale

2. Princeton vs. 3.
Harvard

Cornell beats Princeton

Harvard beats Yale

Brown beats Dartmouth

i-1876ff48a33e08c10b13f314c4bca22a-arrow.jpg

Ivy tournament:

1. Brown vs. 4.
Harvard

2. Cornell vs. 3.
Princeton

Cornell beats Princeton

Yale beats Harvard

Brown beats Dartmouth

i-1876ff48a33e08c10b13f314c4bca22a-arrow.jpg

Ivy tournament:

1. Cornell vs. 4.
Brown

2. Princeton vs. 3.
Yale

Cornell beats Princeton

Yale beats Harvard

Dartmouth beats Brown

i-1876ff48a33e08c10b13f314c4bca22a-arrow.jpg

Ivy tournament:

1. Cornell vs. 4.
Dartmouth

2. Princeton vs. 3.
Yale

Ivy League women’s lacrosse tournament preview

i-0193f8d7cfc6800d8c62f1136ae2bd57-wlaxtourn.jpg

An overtime goal by freshman Caroline Rehfuss pushed Princeton women’s lacrosse to an 11-10 win over Dartmouth April 25. The victory clinched Princeton’s spot in the first Ivy League women’s lacrosse tournament, April 30 and May 2. The fourth-seeded Tigers will play Penn, the No. 1 seed and tournament host, at 7 p.m. April 30 at Franklin Field. Below, PAW provides brief sketches of the four tournament teams.

4. Princeton (6-9, 4-3 Ivy)

National rank: not ranked

Top scorers: Lizzy Drumm ’11 (30 goals, nine assists), Kristin Morrison ’10 (23 goals, 13 assists), Barb Previ ’12 (14 goals, 12 assists), Cassie Pyle ’12 (16 goals, eight assists)

In net: Erin Tochihara ’11 (10.5 goals-against average, 127 saves)

Latest news: Tochihara had one of the best games of her career in Princeton’s season-ending win over Dartmouth, saving 14 shots against the high-scoring Big Green.

Continue reading

Sports shorts: Spring updates

i-afb992907ef41cf27734ed5266dccd95-wb_sports.jpg

Second baseman Noel Gonzales-Luna ’10’s 12th-inning single drove in two runs and gave BASEBALL a 4-3 win over Harvard April 3 in the Ivy League opener for both teams. The Tigers split their doubleheader with the Crimson and also split two games against Dartmouth the following day.

SOFTBALL senior Jamie Lettire hit her 36th and 37th career home runs in a doubleheader against Dartmouth April 3, tying the Princeton home-run record held by Melissa Finley ’05. But the Tigers dropped both games and opened Ivy play with four consecutive losses.

Tyler Fiorito ’12 made a career-high 17 saves as MEN’S LACROSSE beat Brown, 9-7, in Foxborough, Mass., April 3. The Tigers improved to 7-1 entering their much-anticipated matchup with Syracuse, the two-time defending national champion, at the new Meadowlands Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J., April 10.

Continue reading

Creative offense leads men’s lacrosse to 2-0 start

By David Marcus ’92

Under former head coach Bill Tierney, the Princeton men’s lacrosse team won games by confusing opponents with a unique defensive style. Tierney’s successor, Chris Bates, is doing the same thing with offense. The Tigers beat Johns Hopkins 11-10 in overtime at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore March 6, a week after opening their season with a 17-14 victory at home over Hofstra. Princeton’s impressive offensive production stems from Bates’s free-flowing system, and it comes despite the loss of three of the team’s top four scorers last year.

i-bfbd30bfc5d7b138d612fd6cc49f5e93-jmcbride.jpg

Jack McBride ’11 (Photo by Beverly Schaefer)

“They’re a challenging group to defend because of the way they play offense, a hybrid of box [indoor] lacrosse and basketball,” said Hopkins coach Dave Pietramala after Saturday’s game. “They try to confuse you and force you to jump in and out of a defense. They’re slick off the ball. They’re unselfish.”

The change is evident even in Princeton’s best offensive player, preseason first-team All-American Jack McBride ’11, who scored many of his 35 goals last year by beating defensemen one-on-one. This year, McBride is moving more without the ball, and he’s quicker to pass.

Continue reading

Princeton lacrosse, NCAA round two

Tigers fall to Ivy rival Cornell

By David Marcus ’92

Cornell defeated Princeton 6-4 in the NCAA Division I men’s lacrosse quarterfinals May 16. The game was only the third in the 39-year history of the NCAA tournament in which two opponents combined to score fewer than 11 goals.

i-6d594340ad3cf7886bfb65e97b64608d-mlax.jpg

“It was nothing short of a slugfest,” said Cornell head coach Jeff Tambroni. “I don’t think I’ve ever seen a game in which two teams with so many gifted offensive players got shut down like that.”

“Both teams knocked the ball to the ground a lot more than I’ve seen in a long while,” said Princeton head coach Bill Tierney. “I thought both defenses played extremely well.”

Both coaches signaled their anticipation of such a contest by calling timeouts in the first quarter. Tambroni used one to adjust his defense late in the period, and Tierney countered by setting up an extra-man play after Jack McBride ’11 scored to cut Cornell’s lead to 2-1 with 1:52 left. But Princeton was unable to capitalize on the opportunity, and Cornell answered by scoring a critical goal with eleven seconds left in the quarter. “To be honest, I thought it got away from us when they made it 3-1,” Tierney said.

Continue reading

Princeton lacrosse, NCAA round one

First midfield leads Princeton men to first-round win

i-e50e254f5d85ab58b8ad754acffd8537-kovler.jpgBy David Marcus ’92

Mark Kovler ’09 scored five goals and added an assist to lead Princeton University’s men’s lacrosse team to a 10-7 win over the University of Massachusetts in an opening round NCAA playoff game at Princeton May 10. With the win, the Tigers advance to play Ivy League rival Cornell at noon May 16 in a quarterfinal match at Hofstra University.

“It was a tough game for us,” Princeton head coach Bill Tierney said of his squad’s first playoff win since 2006. “It was a big mental hurdle. Now we know who’s waiting for us. We know them and what they do, and they know us and what we do.”

The game turned on a timeout by Tierney in the second quarter. Goalie Tyler Fiorito ’12 was struggling to clear the ball and heaved a pass from his own end of the field into the UMass half. Princeton’s Jack McBride ’11 came up with the ball, and Tierney immediately called timeout with 6:10 left and Princeton leading 3-1. Kovler scored on the ensuing possession and added another goal a minute later. He finished out the half by firing a shot past the Minutemen’s second-string goalie after starter Doc Schneider got an unnecessary roughness penalty. Schneider came into the game with the second-highest save percentage in Division I and made 13 saves against Princeton.

UMass never got closer than three goals in the second half. Fiorito made four of his 12 saves in the fourth quarter to preserve the lead before Rich Sgalardi ’09 scored the last of his three goals with two minutes left to give Princeton (13-2) a 10-6 lead.

Kovler and Sgalardi played in Princeton’s first midfield along with Scott McKenzie ’10, who added a goal and an assist against UMass. With temperatures in the mid-60s and UMass holding the ball for long stretches, Tierney was able to use his first midfield on most of his team’s possessions, a strategy that may become harder to implement in hot weather or a more up-tempo game.

UMass usually opted for a man-to-man defense, and Tierney and his offensive coordinator, Dave Metzbower, countered by initiating almost all of their offense from the midfield. Kovler, Sgalardi and McKenzie finished what they started by accounting for nine of Princeton’s 10 goals and all three of its assists. Attack Tommy Davis ’09 broke their stranglehold on the scoring column with a man-up goal late in the third quarter.

The victory sets up a rematch with Cornell, which defeated Princeton 10-7 in Ithaca April 18. The Big Red won 14 of 19 face-offs that day, allowing them to dominate time of possession. The two teams tied for the Ivy League title (each was 5-1 in Ivy games). The winner of the May 16 game will earn a trip to the Final Four at Gillette Stadium in Foxboro, Mass.

Women’s lacrosse stifles Hoyas in 15-9 win

By Eben Novy-Williams ’10

If there was one play that perfectly exemplified the Princeton women’s lacrosse team’s 15-9 dismantling of Georgetown in the first round of the NCAA tournament May 10, it came with 17:47 remaining in the second half.

Following a free-position save by sophomore goaltender Erin Tochihara, the Tigers pushed the ball up the field in a hurry. After crossing midfield, midfielder Holly McGarvie ’09 found attack Kristin Morrison ’10 streaking toward the goal and fed a perfect pass over the Georgetown defense. Morrison caught the ball in stride and stuffed it inside the Hoyas’ net to give Princeton an 11-7 lead.

Throughout the program’s second straight first-round victory, the Tigers (14-3) were proficient on both ends of the field. Senior midfielder Kristin Schwab had a team-high five goals, while Tochihara made eight saves and the Princeton defense held the Hoyas scoreless for the first 26:48 of the second half.

“This was a really big win for us against a very talented Georgetown team,” Princeton head coach Chris Sailer said. “We came out and really executed our game plan very well. … We’ve been united in a common mission all year long, and we saw that on the field today.”

The Hoyas opened the scoring just 1:44 into the game, but the Tigers responded with four straight goals — from Morrison, Schwab, Christine Casaceli ’09, and McGarvie — to build a lead they would never relinquish. Georgetown pulled within one with 18 seconds remaining in the first half, but the Tigers opened the second frame with five unanswered goals to put the game away.

As impressive as the Princeton offense was, however, the second half belonged to Tochihara, who led the defense in its domination of one of the nation’s most talented offenses.

“I came out in the second half a lot more relaxed,” Tochihara said. “I really just focused on playing my game.”

It may not have been the prettiest of games — the defensive struggles at the end of the first half were eerily reminiscent of Princeton’s loss to No. 2 Maryland two weeks ago — but the Tigers were best when it mattered most, especially in the second half, when they won nine of 10 draws and 11 of 16 ground balls. Schwab led the team with five goals, Morrison added four goals and an assist, and McGarvie, the Ivy League Player of the Year, recorded a team-high three ground balls.

The Tigers now advance to the second round of the NCAA tournament May 16, where they play a familiar opponent: undefeated defending-champion Northwestern.

“We have a lot of experience in the tournament now, and having lost to Northwestern last year, we have a lot of revenge that is motivating us,” Schwab said. “Having played them last year is going to really benefit us going into the game on Saturday.”

Front office

Shapiro ’89 talks about the business of baseball

More than 40 executives and athletes from professional and Olympic sports — including eight Princeton alumni — came to campus Dec. 5 for the third annual Princeton Sports Symposium, a six-hour event designed to bring students together with experts in the field.
Mark Shapiro ’89, executive vice president and general manager of the Cleveland Indians, headlined the opening session, a discussion with Shaprio and his father, sports agent and lawyer Ronald Shapiro, led by Sports Illustrated baseball writer Tom Verducci.
The panelists answered questions, including a few about the fate of pro sports in the current economy. All agreed that sports teams are not recession-proof, with declining ticket sales and sponsorships already affecting most franchises. The younger Shapiro, who is at Major League Baseball’s winter meetings this week, predicted shorter free-agent contracts this year, in response to the economy.
Each speaker talked about his path to the business of sport. Verducci broke in as a three-month intern at Newsday, while the elder Shapiro negotiated his first baseball contract for Hall of Famer Brooks Robinson a few months after helping Robinson navigate a sticky situation involving a tax shelter.
Mark Shapiro loved baseball, but did not know exactly how to turn it into a career. “My father counseled me not to get involved in the front office of baseball, so like a typical 22-year-old, I defied him,” he said. After sending letters to every team in baseball, he took a job with the only team that offered one — the last-place Indians — and over the last 18 years, he ascended the ranks, helping to build Cleveland into a playoff team and frequent contender.
As the session ended, Verducci jokingly urged Indians fans to come forward and suggest off-season trades. Shapiro smiled and replied, “I get a lot of free advice. I could always use a little more.”

Teams wrap toys for local kids

i-9712319180b70e9274b231a5717fc2be-wlax.jpg
What could bring hundreds of Princeton athletes together to sit Indian style on the Frist Campus Center floor? Group yoga class?
Think again. Dec. 3 marked Athletes in Action’s ninth annual Teams and Toys event. More than 50 campus groups, including all of Princeton’s varsity teams and several club teams, sororities, and dance groups, bought and wrapped holiday gifts for more than 180 underprivileged children who participate in Princeton’s Community House projects.
Katie Cox, a senior captain of the women’s lacrosse team, called the event a “great way to kick-off the holiday season as a team.” This year, the women’s lacrosse team was asked to buy gifts for a family of five girls. While shopping for their presents, the team “tried to imagine what we would have liked at their ages.” It seems that the men’s lacrosse team followed the same logic, buying armloads of basketballs, dartboards, movies, and DVDs.
The Teams and Toys event has become a vital part of Athletes in Action (AIA), one of Princeton’s Christian ministry groups. Farrell Harding ’10, who heads the group, explains that “AIA looks at this event as a way to serve God by giving back to our community and campus.” But AIA does not discriminate, Harding said. Whether moved by religious devotion or just the spirit of giving back, all are welcome to lend a hand. By Sarah Harrison ’09
Above, the women’s lacrosse team wraps toys Dec. 3. (Photo by Sarah Harrison ’09)

U.S. cannot let up on foreign aid, panelists say

The United States must continue to provide humanitarian aid to developing countries despite the economic crisis at home, four panelists argued Dec. 2 at Robertson Hall.
The panel, entitled “What are American Obligations to Financing Poverty Relief and Global Health in Economic Hard Times?,” featured Woodrow Wilson School professor and former World Bank researcher Jeff Hammer, ethicist and professor Peter Singer, politics professor Charles Beitz, and president and founder of Orphans International Worldwide (OIWW) Jim Luce.
Hammer admitted that he was “a little puzzled” by the panel’s title, as it gave the misguided impression that foreign aid is a major part of the current U.S. budget. In actuality, Hammer noted, the U.S. government budgeted only $16 billion — about 0.5 percent of the national budget — for humanitarian aid in 2008.
“We spent more on Citibank last weekend,” he added.
Singer stressed the potential impact of individuals on humanitarian aid, arguing that “we shouldn’t just be relying on governments to do something about these issues.” Luce, who founded OIWW after witnessing the dire conditions of orphaned children in Indonesia, spoke to Singer’s point, saying he felt he had a “personal obligation” to help.
While Beitz agreed with Singer and Luce, he stressed the role of the U.S. government, saying that “to neglect the potential of rich countries’ governments is a mistake.” By Sarah Harrison ’09

Digital dating

Art, from personal ads

i-d3cb1c79555c57601f6ff8563e798f77-wantyoutowantme.jpg“I Want You to Want Me,” an interactive installation by Jonathan Harris ’02 and Sep Kamvar ’99 that explores the search for love in the world of online dating, is on view at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, through May 12, as part of the museum’s exhibit Design and the Elastic Mind.
The installation, displayed on a 56-inch touch screen, periodically collects data from online dating sites. Hundreds of blue and pink balloons float on the interactive screen, and each balloon represents a dating profile. Viewers can touch any balloon, causing a sentence to appear. The sentences begin with phrases like “I am …” or “I am looking for ….”
On a Web site describing the work, Harris and Kamvar wrote that “‘I Want You to Want Me’ aims to be a mirror, in which people see reflections of themselves as they glimpse the lives of others.” By Katherine Federici Greenwood

Photo: An image of “Who I am,” the first movement of “I Want You to Want Me.” Each balloon is a real dating profile. Image courtesy of Jonathan Harris ’02 and Sep Kamvar ’99

Names in the News

In an interview published April 4, Michael Aron *70, senior political correspondent for the NJN radio and television network, told The Times of Trenton that New Jersey politicians often follow a pattern of good intentions and bad timing. … Ilya Shapiro ’99, a senior fellow in constitutional studies at the Cato Institute, critiqued the U.S. policy on H-1B visas – given to skilled workers – in a National Review column. … Composer Steven Gerber *71‘s new CD, Spirituals, features 10 brief compositions for string orchestra and draws on African influences. … In an NPR story about China’s public image abroad, human rights campaigner John Kamm ’72 said that Chinese officials are more concerned with the opinion of the Chinese people, which remains positive. … Woodrow Wilson School Dean Anne-Marie Slaughter ’80, who is living in Shanghai during a sabbatical year, described the contrast between Asian optimism and American pessimism in an April 14 NPR commentary. … In The Hill, Democratic pollster Mark Mellman ’78 dissected the mistakes of presidential hopeful Sen. Hillary Clinton. “Clinton did have a macro-message early on — experience,” Mellman wrote. “It was just the wrong message. Every poll for two years demonstrated that Democrats prefer change over experience by 2 to 1.”

Women’s lacrosse sprints to 10-0 start

With an impressive 18-9 win over Harvard April 12, Princeton women’s lacrosse improved to 10-0, its best start since 2004, when the Tigers were a perfect 16-0 in the regular season. Princeton, ranked No. 2 in the April 14 Inside Lacrosse poll, faces three top-10 teams in its final six games: No. 6 Penn (April 16 at 7 p.m. in Class of 1952 Stadium); No. 3 Maryland (April 30 at 7 p.m. in Class of 1952 Stadium); and No. 8 Georgetown (May 3 at 1 p.m. in Washington, D.C.).
The Tigers’ attack has shown remarkable balance and accuracy in the first 10 games. Five players have scored 16 or more goals, and 52 percent of the team’s shots have reached the back of the net, best in the Ivy League.

The countdown:

i-229a642cb0a05937655dc80170b1aac7-Reunions4.jpg i-2b78570f9dabcc4fb2a974fcaa12293a-reunions3.jpg

Days until Reunions 2008