Category Archives: Throwback Thursday

#ThrowbackThursday: Climbing Mount Princeton

(PAW Archives)

James R. Wade ’59 led a winter ascent of Mount Princeton in 1964. (PAW Archives)

Over the years, many Princetonians have made the gallant trek up the 14,197-foot-high Mount Princeton in Colorado.

William Libbey 1877 (Library of Congress/Wikipedia)

William Libbey 1877 (Library of Congress/Wikipedia)

The “intrepid” William Libbey, Jr. ’77 (1877, that is) made the first recorded ascent less than a month after graduating, PAW reported in 1997. Libbey apparently had no difficulty with the ascent until he came within 1,500 feet of the summit, “when his only way lay over a bed of débris . . .; the size of the boulders being such that nothing but the hardest sort of crawling would answer,” according to a report of the expedition.

In 1964, at the request of the Rocky Mountain Princeton Club, which was publicizing an upcoming conference, James R. Wade ’59 led a winter expedition that successfully conquered the summit. Wade is pictured above in the cover photo from PAW’s March 17, 1964, issue. Continue reading

#ThrowbackThursday: Keeping Books in Circulation

Images from PAW’s 1978 story on theft at Princeton libraries, from left: A library guard served as “a reminder to be honest”; new security measures included electronic scanners; librarian Peter Cziffra shows tabs in the card catalog that indicate missing books.

Images from PAW’s 1978 story on theft at Princeton libraries, from left: A library guard served as “a reminder to be honest”; new security measures included electronic scanners; librarian Peter Cziffra showed tabs in the card catalog that indicated missing books.

On a winter Friday 33 years ago, local police found more than 2,000 stolen library books — including nearly 1,000 from Princeton University and the Princeton Theological Seminary — at the home of a former graduate student.

It wasn’t the first time the University had dealt with book theft. In January 1978, Firestone Library estimated that some 150,000 its volumes had disappeared, almost certainly as a result of theft. “One year we put the books out, the next year they’re gone,” Peter Cziffra, then the head of the Fine Hall math and physics library, told PAW. (The story’s headline: “Crime in the Stacks.”)

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#ThrowbackThursday: A Creative Solution to the No-Car Rule

From the 1920s through the 1960s, Princeton’s no-car rule banned undergraduates from having a vehicle on campus. Some lucky souls, of course, managed to get around the restriction by parking in town. But no one sidestepped the rule so deftly and with such style as Eric Grinnell ’61 did as a 19-year-old sophomore in 1958: He brought a horse-drawn carriage onto campus.

(PAW Archives)

(PAW Archives)

“Old Elegance at Old Nassau,” read a Life magazine feature on Grinnell’s ingenious endeavor. The New York Times also picked up on the story, giving him front-page attention alongside articles on the Republicans’ campaign strategy and nuclear testing in the Soviet Union. Continue reading

#ThrowbackThursday: Princeton Gothic

(PAW Archives/Bruce Beckner ’71)

(PAW Archives/Bruce Beckner ’71)

Elizabeth Emerson ’73 and Herman Reepmeyer ’72 posed for this Grant Wood-esque PAW cover photo in 1971. The story inside profiled “student artisans” — young men and women with hobbies fit for the frontier, including weaving, glassmaking, pottery, and woodcarving. Sociology major Michael Rodemeyer ’72 interviewed four students, including Emily Bonacarti ’73, who had traveled to Sweden in the summer to learn more about weaving. “There was a time when you had to know these crafts to survive,” she said. “Today people are getting lost in the technology. They want to know they can do something.”

The magazine also mentioned a small but growing interest in vegetarian diets and farm-fresh produce. That seed blossomed on the campus and has continued to grow in the last decade with the creation of a student-run organic garden, new sustainability initiatives in Dining Services, continued interest in the vegetarian 2 Dickinson co-op (founded in 1977), and more.

#ThrowbackThursday: Princeton’s Proctors

Proctor “Axel” Peterson, with pipe, looks on as students interview Dr. Timothy Leary. (George Peterson ’69/PAW Archives)

Proctor “Axel” Peterson, with pipe, looks on as students interview Dr. Timothy Leary. (George Peterson ’69/PAW Archives)

For generations of Princeton alumni, PAW contributor George Peterson ’69 wrote in 1967, “memories of undergraduate years invariably include the proctors.” At the time, the men in suits and hats had been charged with maintaining order on the campus for nearly a century. They filled other roles as well, like transporting ill students to the infirmary or delivering urgent messages. By 1967, there were seven proctors, working with a growing campus security department that employed 63 uniformed officers.

Proctor Mike Kopliner, left, in 1937. (PAW Archives)

Proctor Mike Kopliner, left, in 1937. (PAW Archives)

The Office of the Proctor, created by President James McCosh in 1870, began as a department of one — Matt Goldie, who held the post for 22 years. Goldie was well respected and had a reputation for being “square and honest,” according to A Princeton Companion. The reputations of his successors were mixed. There were some who earned affection from the students — the Princeton University Band paid tribute to one, Mike Kopliner, by forming a giant K in his honor during a halftime show. Others were labeled “the Pinkertons of Princeton” in a popular student song from the 1930s and ’40s.

One memorable proctor, the 6-foot-7-inch Herbert “Axel” Peterson, explained the group’s philosophy in a 1967 interview with The Prince: “We treat the boys like they want to be treated. If they don’t give us trouble, we won’t give them any.”

“Axel” Peterson tones down a party in Holder Hall, circa 1967. (George Peterson ’69/PAW Archives)

“Axel” Peterson tones down a party in Holder Hall, circa 1967. (George Peterson ’69/PAW Archives)

#ThrowbackThursday: Santa Claus, Honorary Princetonian?

121990_coverFrom the Dec. 19, 1990, cover of PAW:

“It’s not all gimme, gimme, gimme! Here’s one from Princeton University. They want to confer an honorary degree on you — Doctor of Humanitarian Service.”

The cartoon and the imaginary letter from Nassau Hall are creations of longtime New Yorker cartoonist Henry Martin ’48, a prolific artist who got his start at The Princeton Tiger. Martin has contributed dozens of drawings to PAW’s pages over the years, including wry takes on Reunions and thumbnail sketches that still find their way into the Class of ’48’s notes column. In 2010, he donated nearly 700 drawings to the University Library.

READ MORE: Gregg Lange ’70’s column about Henry Martin and the Class of 1948