Category Archives: Throwback Thursday

#ThrowbackThursday: Cycling to New Haven, 1958

The Ivy five failed in their attempt to cycle to the Yale game, but that didn’t stop them from taking a victory lap. (PAW Archives)

The Ivy five failed in their attempt to cycle to the Yale game, but that didn’t stop them from taking a victory lap. (PAW Archives)

Richard Puffer ’59, a Cottage Club member, had been basking in the spotlight for weeks as campus gossip revolved around his plans to bicycle the 130 miles to Yale for the Princeton-Yale football game.

Disgruntled, five Ivy Club men decided to “take the light off of Puffer,” as one of them recounted later to The Daily Princetonian. They rented an antique five-man tandem bicycle and declared that they, too, would take on the cycling challenge. Continue reading

#ThrowbackThursday: Armistice Day at Princeton

Students and soldiers read news of the end of World War I. (PAW Archives/Orren Jack Turner)

Students and soldiers read news of the end of World War I. (PAW Archives/Orren Jack Turner)

Lt. John E. Osmun 1916 was a lucky one: He lived to tell his tale. He was flying a bombing plane in France with his squadron during World War I when a huge, dense cloud enveloped him. He lost sight of his own wing tips, became caught in a spin, and soon started to hurtle rapidly towards the ground.

“Well, this is rather too bad, but it’s the end for yours truly,” he thought, as related in a letter to his father, excerpts of which were published in the Nov. 20, 1918, issue of PAW. “I wonder how soon the ground will come up and kill us.”

Frantically pulling at his controls, Osmun managed to come out of the spin. None of the other planes he had originally flown with was in sight, so he headed back to base.

It was then that he learned that the formation had encountered enemy planes, Osmun wrote. Fierce fighting had ensued, and only one other plane returned. The spin — which he had thought would be the end of him — had actually saved him. Continue reading

#ThrowbackThursday: Triangle Hits — And Misses

The 1970-71 Triangle Club show, Cracked Ice, featured a 40-member cast and a range of material, from Laugh-In-style one-liners to 20-minute theatrical pieces. (PAW Archives)

The 1970-71 Triangle Club show, Cracked Ice, featured a 40-member cast and a range of material, from Laugh-In-style one-liners to 20-minute theatrical pieces. (PAW Archives)

A scene from the 1969 Triangle show, Call a Spade A Shovel. (PAW Archives)

A scene from the 1969 Triangle show, Call a Spade a Shovel. (PAW Archives)

Since the late 1800s, student members of the Princeton Triangle Club have written, produced, and performed full-scale musical comedies that riff on topics specific to the campus as well as those of society at large. But the shows’ humor hasn’t always gone over well with audiences: The political satire of its 1969 show, Call a Spade a Shovel, caused many alumni to walk out “with clenched fists and gritted teeth” during the group’s 13-city December tour, PAW reported.

The next year, Triangle cancelled its tour and created a spring show that shifted the focus from campus activism and national political movements to something a little lighter. Titled Cracked Ice, the show aimed to be “an entertaining story with a moral — not a sermon or a demand,” according to Triangle president J. William Metzger ’71, who previewed the group’s Reunions performances in a story for PAW.

What might this year’s show entail? Find out when An Inconvenient Sleuth opens Nov. 14 at McCarter Theatre. The show will run through Nov. 16, with January intercession touring dates to be announced.

#ThrowbackThursday: 1964 Princeton Football

Coach Dick Colman, left, with Cosmo Iacavazzi ’65 in 1964. (PAW Archives)

Coach Dick Colman, left, with Cosmo Iacavazzi ’65 in 1964. (PAW Archives)

At halftime of this weekend’s Princeton-Harvard game, the University will honor the 1964 Tigers football team, which completed the program’s last perfect season 50 years ago this fall. The team included a trio of All-Americans — running back Cosmo Iacavazzi ’65, linebacker Stas Maliszewski ’66, and kicker Charlie Gogolak ’66 — as well as future College Football Hall of Fame coach Dick Colman.

Continue reading

#ThrowbackThursday: Chancellor Green, Espresso Bar

Dave Lee ’86, left, and Steve Fein ’86 show off Chancellor Green’s coffee bar in 1985. (Larry Wolfen ’87/PAW Archives)

Dave Lee ’86, left, and Steve Fein ’86 show off Chancellor Green’s coffee bar in 1985. (Larry Wolfen ’87/PAW Archives)

With its beautiful stained glass windows, wood-paneled walls, and the occasional bird fluttering by, today’s Chancellor Green is a peaceful haven for studying. But it wasn’t always so quiet.

“On a Thursday night, you couldn’t move,” Duncan MacNichol ’81 told the Daily Princetonian in 2009.

MacNichol was describing the Chancellor Green pub, which opened after New Jersey lowered the drinking age from 21 to 18 in 1973. For about 10 years, students socialized at the pub over beers and snacks. The pub closed in 1984, after the drinking age was raised back to 21. In 1985, Chancellor Green reopened as a coffee bar, above, featuring espressos, cappuccinos, teas, and pastries.

There have been efforts in the last few years to reopen a campus pub, but plans were shelved recently because an ideal location couldn’t be found. For now, Chancellor Green, which began its life as a library, will continue to be a silent space, but for the turning of pages and the tapping of a keyboard.

#ThrowbackThursday: Buckminster Fuller at Princeton

(PAW Archives)

(PAW Archives)

fuller_b

(PAW Archives)

R. Buckminster Fuller, an architect and inventor best known for promoting the use of geodesic domes, taught as a visiting lecturer at Princeton in the 1950s and made his mark with experimental structures such as the “discontinuous compression sphere,” a towering, self-supported globe composed of aluminum pipes and cables. (The photo above shows the work in progress, with an assist from the local fire department.) Popular Science, in its brief description of the sphere, noted that Fuller had a “reputation for unusual designs … that appear to be held up only by equations.” Continue reading

#ThrowbackThursday: Engineers in the 1920s and ’30s

(PAW Archives, June 7, 1935)

(PAW Archives, June 7, 1935)

In the summer of 1933, Princeton professor George E. Beggs, above, and Elmer K. Timby made and tested a celluloid scale model of a tower of the Golden Gate Bridge, using a technique that Beggs had invented to test the stress resistance of bridges and other structures. (In the photo, he’s working with a model of the proposed Camden-Philadelphia Tunnel.) Their work attracted nationwide attention, and Beggs’ method has since been used by engineers worldwide.

Engineering, however, did not always take center stage at Princeton. In fact, engineering did not come to Princeton until 1875 — more than a century after the University’s founding in 1746. Until the 1920s, course offerings were limited to civil engineering for undergrads and electrical engineering for graduate students. In a predominantly liberal-arts campus, it seemed, engineering remained on the sidelines.

To bridge the gap between technical training and a liberal-arts education, the University created an “engineering plus” program in 1921. In essence, engineering education was to be liberalized: Undergraduate engineers would be trained in both technical fundamentals as well as cultural and humanistic studies. Fourteen years later, Carlton S. Proctor 1915, a future president of the American Society of Engineers, penned an enthusiastic overview of the program in PAW, calling it “a distinctly Princeton education.”

#ThrowbackThursday: Princeton at Lincoln Center

(John H.W. Simpson ’66/PAW Archives, January 12, 1983)

(John H.W. Simpson ’66/PAW Archives, January 12, 1983)

“Princeton’s young singers and musicians did very well.” So declared a New York Times reviewer in a December 1982 recap of the Princeton University Opera Theater’s sold-out performance of Beethoven’s Fidelio at Lincoln Center.

Fidelio had started out as a campus production the previous spring. The performance so impressed the Beethoven Society that it sponsored the Princeton University Opera Theater performance at Lincoln Center. Michael Pratt, who conducted the opera — and who still conducts the University Orchestra and directs the program in musical performance — was hailed by the Times as a “real hero,” displaying a “sense of just the right tempo … careful phrasing and well-planned dynamics.”

More than 30 years later, the Princeton University Opera Theater is still singing strong. In January 2014, it staged a performance of Monteverdi’s The Coronation of Poppea in Richardson Auditorium, and next January, it is slated to perform Henry Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas and Jonathan Dove’s Tobias and the Angel.

#ThrowbackThursday: Princeton Rugby, 1964

rugby-coverSaturday marks the final opening day of Princeton’s fall sports season as the Tiger football team kicks off its 2014 schedule at San Diego. On campus, a pair of varsity teams will be competing (men’s tennis, field hockey), along with club sports, including men’s and women’s rugby.

Rugby is among the University’s longest-running club teams, with more than 80 consecutive years of competition on the men’s side. PAW’s May 19, 1964, cover featured this action shot of the Princeton ruggers, left, in action against the New York Rugby Club, which won the match, 8-6. Later that year, a Daily Princetonian article described the ethos of the Tiger team:

“Rugby at Princeton is a sport for gentlemen,” wrote Chris Jones ’67. “It has to be. If it didn’t have a fairly high level of sportsmanship, nobody would be able to even crawl away from this bruising game. It is rather ungentlemanly cruelty to beat the brains out of a man you’re going to be drinking with in the beer party that the home team always gives for its opponents right after the game.”

#ThrowbackThursday: Artist Toshiko Takaezu

Toshiko Takaezu in 1967. (PAW Archives)

Toshiko Takaezu in 1967, her first year at Princeton. (PAW Archives)

A simple, solemn bronze bell hangs from a wooden post at the entrance to Princeton’s Sept. 11 memorial garden outside Chancellor Green. Titled “Remembrance,” the bell was created by Toshiko Takaezu, a longtime faculty member in Princeton’s visual-arts program.

Takaezu, who died in 2011, first arrived on campus in 1967, two years before the beginning of coeducation. She was among a handful of artists who breathed new life into creative-arts instruction during an expansion led by then-President Robert Goheen ’40 *48. Takaezu also earned acclaim for her innovative work as a ceramicist, painter, and weaver.

In 1996, four years after retiring from teaching, Takaezu received an honorary doctor of fine arts degree at Princeton’s commencement. The citation credited her for encouraging “generations of Princeton students to use their creative powers to shape and center their lives.”

#ThrowbackThursday: Moving In, 1948

Upperclassmen move in to Witherspoon Hall in September 1948. (Alan W. Richards/PAW Archives)

Upperclassmen move in to Witherspoon Hall in September 1948. (Alan W. Richards/PAW Archives)

Princeton upperclassmen arriving back on campus in September 1948 found a couple of significant changes: Firestone Library was nearly complete, while the books at the old Pyne Library had been pulled from their shelves; and the swimming team finally had a new home at Dillon, after being pool-less for four years due to a fire that destroyed the gymnasium.

The U-Store, in the midst of a reorganization, had found dusty boxes of silk top hats and canes — relics that, according to PAW columnist William T. Barry III ’50, “drew curious eyes and eager buyers.” But students had more than costumes and frivolity on their minds. At class registration in Dillon Gym, a sign directed them to visit the balcony and register for Selective Service. “These signs reminded all the non-veterans that their college careers are liable to be interrupted by the draft before graduation,” Barry wrote.

#ThrowbackThursday: Princeton’s Aviation Pioneers

Flying ace Elliott Springs, Class of 1917, with his wife, Frances. (PAW Archives)

Flying ace Elliott Springs, Class of 1917, with his wife, Frances. (PAW Archives)

Nearly a decade after earning fame as a World War I flying ace, Elliott Springs, Class of 1917, had transitioned to a new career as an author, editing the best-seller War Birds and writing a pair of other popular books. But, as Springs wrote in PAW, flying remained an integral part of his life. And even though he’d endured enemy gunfire, stalled engines, a leak that squirted hot oil into his face for hours, and a motor that vibrated so badly that it shook a filling from his tooth, he claimed to have “never made a flight that I did not enjoy.”

Springs, pictured above with his wife, Frances, headlined the Feb. 24, 1928, issue of PAW, which was devoted entirely to aviation — a hot topic in the winter following Charles Lindbergh’s historic trans-Atlantic flight. Other authors in the magazine included F.B. Rentschler 1909, the president of Pratt and Whitney Aircraft Co.; James L. Breese 1909, part of the U.S. Navy crew that made a trans-Atlantic flight (with stops) in 1919; and James S. McDonnell ’21, a young airplane designer who would go on to create McDonnell Aircraft.

The issue also featured an article called “A Vacation on Wings,” about summer training in the Naval Reserve’s air unit, written by Harvey Williamson ’27. Sadly, Williamson died six months later in a plane crash near his home in Duluth, Minn. The airfield there was re-named in his honor.

#ThrowbackThursday: Touching Up Witherspoon

(J. Todd Faulkner ’70/PAW Archives)

(J. Todd Faulkner ’70/PAW Archives)

Summers on campus are filled with the sounds of construction and renovation. This year’s projects include the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, the Arts and Transit Neighborhood, a major refurbishment at 20 Washington Road (the former Frick chemistry lab), and numerous other improvements around campus.

In 1970, Witherspoon Hall was on the list of buildings in need of work. But PAW noted that the 93-year-old dorm might be on track for demolition: “State fire laws have forced the closing of the top three floors, and the [University] trustees have concluded that the cost of renovation ($2 million) just isn’t worth it.”

Fortunately, the report of Witherspoon’s demise was premature. Residents and alumni started a “Save ’Spoon” campaign in 1970, and in 1975, a series of renovations reconfigured the interior and added new stairwells to bring all floors up to code.

For the record

As Emily Trost ’13 notes, the photo identified as Witherspoon in the PAW Archives appears to show Dod Hall, another 19th-century addition to the Princeton campus, completed in 1890.

#ThrowbackThursday: A Seismic Blast from the Past

(PAW Archives, Feb. 26, 1960)

(PAW Archives, Feb. 26, 1960)

“There was once a day that the geological hammer, a pair of stout legs and a keen eye were all that a geologist really needed for his research,” professor Sheldon Judson ’40 wrote in the Feb. 26, 1960, issue of PAW. But by the 1960s, the mantra of “have hammer, will travel” had given way to a new set of instruments, including the seismic truck, right, used to measure the effects of experimental explosions, left.

Judson’s story traced the history of the geosciences at Princeton, beginning with the arrival of Professor Arnold Guyot in 1854, and did not give much attention to the accompanying photos from departmental field work. If any readers recall the seismic truck or can provide details about its research, please use the comment box below.

#ThrowbackThursday: Aerial Views of Princeton, 1967

From 1958 to 1968, Princeton added an astonishing 2.7 million square feet of building space to the campus — increasing the physical plant by 70 percent in the most significant expansion in the University’s history, according to the 2008 Princeton Campus Plan. PAW showcased parts of the construction boom, as captured by photographer Robert Matthews, in a January 1967 photo essay titled “Aerial Princeton.”

Gifts from a $53 million capital campaign funded parts of the growing campus, and Cold War-era funding for scientific research played a prominent role as well. Click the images in the gallery below for a closer look at the additions, which included Robertson Hall, Jadwin Gymnasium, the E-Quad, and New South.

#ThrowbackThursday: Freshmen in Service, 1992

(PAW Archives, Oct. 14, 1992)

(PAW Archives, Oct. 14, 1992)

Tricia Cortez ’96, left, and Leonard Marquez ’96 were among the Princeton freshmen who worked to rehabilitate homes in Trenton during the week before orientation in 1992. They were part of the University’s Urban Action initiative, now known as Community Action. Last year, the program drew 202 participants from the Class of 2017, and this fall, it expects an additional boost, thanks to the University’s increasing support for civic-engagement, highlighted in the July 9 issue of PAW.

 

#ThrowbackThursday: Bill Clarke and the Nassau Nine

(PAW Archives, June 11, 1937)

(PAW Archives, June 11, 1937)

As major league baseball completes its annual All-Star break, PAW takes a brief look at Princeton’s rich baseball history, which dates back to the team’s first game in 1860. The Nassau Nine traveled to Orange, N.J., to play the local baseball club, and the game ended in a tie — 42-42 — after darkness made it impossible to continue playing.

The photo above shows Bill Clarke, left, the longtime Tiger coach and namesake of Clarke Field, in 1937 with assistant coach Amos Eno ’32, center, and captain Dean Hill Jr. ’37. Clarke coached nearly 900 games at the University and won 564 of them — a record that still stands. He also sent 15 former players to the major leagues.

In June, two graduating Tigers were drafted by major-league teams — pitcher Michael Fagan ’14 and outfielder Alec Keller ’14 — and three alumni have played in the big leagues this season. Chris Young ’02 has been a valuable starting pitcher for the Seattle Mariners. Will Venable ’05 is an everyday outfielder for the San Diego Padres. David Hale ’11, who made his big-league debut last September, is vying to return to the Atlanta Braves’ starting rotation. (A fourth major-leaguer, Ross Ohlendorf ’05, suffered an injury in spring training and has been working to rejoin the Washington Nationals.)

In all, 26 Princetonians have played in the majors, but only one has appeared in the All-Star Game: Young, who pitched an inning in relief for the National League in 2007.

#ThrowbackThursday: A Lakeside Perch, 1961

lakeside_1961

PAW Archives, June 2, 1961. Click to enlarge.

The new Lakeside complex for Princeton graduate students will begin housing students sometime this fall, according to the July 9 issue of PAW. The units are on the site of the former Hibben and Magie apartments, from which Betty Menzies captured this PAW cover image, looking east toward the Washington Street bridge, in 1961.

Set in “a beautiful sylvan location,” PAW wrote, the buildings stood eight stories tall — the tallest buildings in Princeton at the time, with Fine Hall’s completion still nine years away. But to those looking south from the campus, the apartments on the shore of Lake Carnegie were invisible.

The new Lakeside buildings, which will include townhomes and apartments, stand two or three stories tall.

An update from reader Arlen Kassof Hastings ’80: Continue reading

#ThrowbackThursday: Princeton’s Spirit of ’76

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PAW’s 1976 Reunions issue, appropriately dated July 4, featured photos of a uniquely colorful P-rade that blended orange and black with red, white, and blue, in honor of the nation’s bicentennial year.

The Class of 1946 — Princeton’s bicentennial class — was particularly fond of the Spirit of ’76. The class was led by an Uncle Sam stilt-walker and a colonial-themed marching band. At least four different bands in the procession donned tri-cornered caps, along with a small contingent of “Yankee Doodle Dandy Tigers.” James M. Banner Jr., then a professor in Princeton’s history department, delivered a lecture about the American Revolution for alumni and their families in the faculty room at Nassau Hall, where British forces had taken refuge during the Battle of Princeton, 199 years earlier.

#ThrowbackThursday: Reunions Style, Circa 1990

05161990As Reunions veterans know, a little customization can make one stand out from the crowd. PAW’s Reunions preview in 1990 featured Nuala O’Connor ’89, then the magazine’s assistant editor, in a beer jacket that included hand-drawn Tigerlilies, a Cloister Inn patch, Reunions buttons, and more. (The Tiger peeking over her shoulder was part of the class-wide design.)

Those ’89 beer jackets may be relegated to the back of the closet now that the class has celebrated its 25th reunion and unveiled its class blazer — a classic black jacket with orange piping and an ’89 shield patch. But some classmates still found a way to differentiate themselves in the P-rade, turning their blazers inside out to showcase a boldly striped lining.

Read more about beer jackets and class blazers in the Weekly Blog archives.

#ThrowbackThursday: Racing a Concrete Canoe

(Marie Bellis/PAW Archives)

(Marie Bellis/PAW Archives)

Building a concrete canoe seems pretty ambitious, and racing one sounds quite arduous. But Princeton engineering students Alan Stone ’74 and William Lewis ’74 were up to both challenges in the spring of their senior year.

For their independent work in the civil engineering department, the two designed and built a 180-pound canoe using wire mesh, ferrocement, and a coating of epoxy resin. The cement was applied by hand, PAW reported, “with the help of friends and a little beer.”

After test runs on Lake Carnegie, Stone and Lewis raced their creation against 39 other entries in an intercollegiate competition on the Schuylkill River. They had confidence in their design but were worried about their ability to paddle in a straight line — a concern that proved unfounded when the bow, adorned with a Princeton P, crossed the finish in first place.

#ThrowbackThursday: Dorm Living, 1890 to 1930

A Princeton dorm room, circa 1895. (PAW Archives)

A Princeton dorm room, circa 1895. (PAW Archives)

An 1890s room in East College, which was razed to make way for East Pyne. (PAW Archives)

An 1890s room in East College, which was razed to make way for East Pyne. (PAW Archives)

In PAW’s July 2, 1929, issue, Frederick Pleasants ’30 penned an enthusiastic essay about dorm-room décor, highlighting a Patton Hall suite “done over in the Colonial manner,” below, as a signal that students were putting aside “the rah-rah collegiate stuff of yesteryear,” above and right.

“Princeton is growing out and growing up,” he wrote, “and from under the veil of Collegism is beginning to give the individual a chance to reflect its real environment.”

Pleasants’ declaration may have been a bit premature: Today’s students certainly have their share of collegiate touches on their dorm-room walls. But the author’s attention to aesthetics paid off after graduation. He served as one of the U.S. Army’s “Monuments Men” in World War II, worked as a curator at the Brooklyn Museum, and lectured in the art departments of several colleges.

Pleasants described this view as “a corner in a modern Patton Hall suite, done over in the Colonial manner.” (PAW Archives)

Pleasants described this view as “a corner in a modern Patton Hall suite, done over in the Colonial manner.” (PAW Archives)

#ThrowbackThursday: Jimmy Stewart ’32, ‘The Most Photographed Man at Reunions’

Jimmy Stewart ’32 in 1982. (Andy Snow ’72)

Jimmy Stewart ’32 in 1982. (Andy Snow ’72)

In PAW’s description, he was “the most photographed man at Reunions.” James Maitland Stewart ’32, back for his 50th reunion in 1982, drew a crowd wherever he went. But he didn’t seem to mind, according to photographer Andy Snow ’72, who was covering the festivities for PAW. “He was so gracious and so wonderful,” Snow recalled. “He was that guy that you think Jimmy Stewart would be.”

Snow, with his trusty Nikon, a fisheye lens, and slide film, captured the image above, featuring Stewart front and center in a sea of orange cowboy hats. The photo was never published in color, Snow said, which seemed like a shame to us. So here it is, in full Kodachrome glory — no filter required.

#ThrowbackThursday: ’64, Squarely Aware

During May, our Throwback Thursday posts have been highlighting some of this year’s major-reunion classes. Our series concludes with the Class of 1964. Happy reuning!

Class numerals are a part of who you are — in PAW, at least, where every alumni name comes with digits attached — and class logos and reunion themes often build on the numbers. Think, for example, of the Class of 1969’s yin and yang logo or the Class of 2006’s “’06 Feet Under” reunion (a great excuse to do the Thriller dance en masse).

(Credits, clockwise from left: Beverly Schaefer; Larry French/PAW Archives; Class of 1964)

(Credits, clockwise from left: Beverly Schaefer; Larry French/PAW Archives; Class of 1964)

For the Class of ’64, being a perfect square was at the root a clever image — the square-root-of-64 eight-ball — that has been a consistent presence for five decades, from the class’s beer-jacket design to its 50th-reunion logo. As Huey Lewis once sang, it’s hip to be square.

#ThrowbackThursday: ’89’s Egyptian Elegance

During May, our Throwback Thursday posts will be highlighting some of this year’s major-reunion classes. Our series continues with the Class of 1989.

(Ricardo Barros)

(Ricardo Barros)

Continuing the tradition of Princeton’s 25th reunion, the Class of 1989 will be unveiling its official class blazer this year, which means these khat-and-collar combos from ’89’s 15th reunion will remain in the closet for next week’s P-rade.

The class has a busy weekend planned for its adventure-themed 25th, which features a full complement of class gatherings as well as an ambitious community-service effort — packaging 50,000 meals for the Kids Against Hunger Coalition. Nine classmates are scheduled to speak at the Alumni-Faculty Forums, including two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Clifford Levy ’89 and Dallas Cowboys head coach Jason Garrett ’89.

#ThrowbackThursday: The Happi Class of 1954

During May, our Throwback Thursday posts will be highlighting some of this year’s major-reunion classes. Our series continues with the Class of 1954.

(PAW Archives, July 12, 1989)

(PAW Archives, July 12, 1989)

PAW’s July 12, 1989, cover (right) featured Somers Steelman ’54 at his 35th reunion, sporting one of the P-rade’s long-enduring favorites: the ’54 happi coat.

Jeremiah Ford ’54, designer of the original coat, explained in the class’s 50th-reunion book that he became absorbed in Japanese culture and history while stationed in the coastal city of Iwakuni as a Marine. He came up with the idea of a class happi coat — traditionally worn by tradesmen — in the hope that it would be “unique, simple, economical, and … ‘one size fits all.’” By that measure, it was a home run: a memorable, distinctive costume that cost each class member just $6 (including shipping from Japan).

Unveiled at ’54’s fifth reunion in 1959, the first happi coat was black with orange trim, white numerals, and a stylish tiger logo on the back. Other iterations followed — a mostly orange one for the 10th; white with orange trim for the 15th; white with black stripes for the 20th; and a white blazer with small happi-coat tigers for the 40th. In 2004, the graduating class paid tribute to ’54, its grandparent class, with an Asian-inspired design for its beer jacket.

#ThrowbackThursday: Jon Stewart and Princeton’s Class of 2004

During May, our Throwback Thursday posts will be highlighting some of this year’s major-reunion classes. Our series continues with the Class of 2004.

Jon Stewart, an honorary member of the Class of 2004, at Class Day. (Denise Applewhite/Office of Communications; published in the July 7, 2004, issue of PAW)

Jon Stewart, an honorary member of the Class of 2004, at Class Day. (Denise Applewhite/Office of Communications; published in the July 7, 2004, issue of PAW)

“There’s something we need to tell you about the real world,” Daily Show host Jon Stewart told the soon-to-be-graduates at Class Day 2004. “I don’t know how to put this so I’ll be blunt. We broke it.”

Stewart, a native of nearby Lawrence Township and brother of alumnus Larry Leibowitz ’82, gave an entertaining address that included encouragement for the graduating class along with quips about Hoagie Haven and an evaluation of then-Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld ’54’s interrogation policy (what some called abuse was actually “freedom tickling”).

Stewart joked that his new 2004 beer jacket, pictured, was on par with an honorary doctorate, and he promised to give it a place of honor — in his attic, “next to the visor I got for doing Arsenio.”

One of student speakers that day, Jay Katsir ’04, made a nod to the humming cicadas that arrived just in time for the Reunions and Commencement festivities. “During the time when other schools have a ‘senior week’ with a variety of university-sponsored events like booze cruises, we have a ‘dead week’ with a variety of biblical plagues, like hail and locusts,” Katsir said.

Stewart was impressed with the budding comedian, telling reporters afterward, “That kid’s good.” Katsir has since won three Emmys for comedy writing with the staff of The Colbert Report.

#ThrowbackThursday: Princeton’s Class of 1944

PAW Archives, July 2, 1954

PAW Archives, July 2, 1954

During May, our Throwback Thursday posts will be highlighting some of this year’s major-reunion classes. Our series begins with the Class of 1944.

When the Class of 1944 last celebrated a major reunion, its P-rade march honored the 22 class members who died in World War II, with classmates and active-duty military members carrying placards that displayed the name, photo, and branch of service for each fallen soldier, airman, seaman, or marine — a poignant and memorable sight for all who witnessed it. Continue reading

#ThrowbackThursday: Grades on the ‘Wailing Wall’

PAW Archives, Feb. 24, 1939

PAW Archives, Feb. 24, 1939

In January 1939, crowds of students lingered around a bulletin board in Nassau Hall, nervously surveying their fall-semester grades, which were posted publicly on what the students jokingly called the “wailing wall.” Seventy-five years later that practice has faded from memory. Today’s Princetonians — thankfully — can find their grades privately on the University’s course registration engine, known by the acronym SCORE. Continue reading

#ThrowbackThursday: Einstein in Princeton

The March 23, 1951, issue of PAW. Click to Enlarge.

The March 23, 1951, issue of PAW. Click to Enlarge.

Before Albert Einstein made his first visit to Princeton, to deliver the Stafford Little Lectures in May 1921, few in the United States knew much about the man, beyond what had been written of his work. As PAW explained in a brief preview, “We are apt to think of such an eminent scientist as Dr. Einstein as a man advanced in years, and no doubt most Americans were surprised to learn that he is but slightly over 40. … He has said that Princeton is the one American university at which he especially desires to speak, because more has been done here in relation to his theory than at any other place in the United States.” Continue reading