Juan José Saer manuscripts, 1958-2004 at Princeton University Library


The Manuscripts Division has recently added the manuscripts of Argentinean writer Juan José Saer to its premier collection of archives, manuscripts, and correspondence by Latin American writers and intellectuals. The collection contains numerous notebooks, notes, and drafts of Saer’s novels, essays, short stories, poems, and interviews. Several items in the collection are unpublished. Also included are background materials for Saer’s posthumous novel, La Grande, and some photographs. A detailed finding aid is already available.

Juan José Saer, the son of Syrian immigrants to Argentina, was born in Serodino, a town in the province of Santa Fé, on June 28, 1937. He studied law and philosophy at the Universidad Nacional del Litoral in Santa Fé, and taught film history and criticism at the same institution. He moved to Paris in 1968, where he taught literature at the University of Rennes, and lived in that city until his death in 2005. Although Saer spent most of his literary life outside Argentina, much of his fiction was set on the area of northern Argentina known as el Litoral. Among his literary works are the novels Cicatrices (1968), El limonero real (1974), Nadie, nada, nunca (1980), El entenado (1983), La ocasión (1988), La pesquisa (1994), and the book of poems El arte de narrar (1977). Saer is considered by some critics to be the most important Argentinean writer of the post-Borges generation.

Photo caption: Photograph of Juan José Saer [Juan José Saer manuscripts, Box 13, Folder 9].

Digital Latin American posters collection grows


The posters included in this new digital project were created by a wide variety of social activists, non-governmental organizations, government agencies, political parties, and other types of organizations across Latin America, in order to publicize their views, positions, agendas, policies, events, and services. Even though posters produced in Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, Mexico, and Venezuela are the most abundant among the more than two thousand currently available in the site, almost every country in the region is represented. In terms of topics, some of the best represented are human rights, elections, gender issues, indigenous issues, labor, ecology and environmental issues, development, public health, and education.

The Latin American Posters Collection is a component of the larger collection of Latin American ephemera that Princeton University Library has developed since the 1970s.

View the Latin American Posters Collection at Princeton University Library

Image caption: Diga basta! Vamos a cambiar la historia! Movimiento Asambleas del Pueblo. Partido de las Asambleas, Argentina

Professor Bruno Carvalho quoted in The New York Times (article on Maracanã stadium)

“Brazil’s Soul, in Form of a Stadium”

RIO DE JANEIRO — Generations of Brazilians have grown up in the Estádio Jornalista Mário Filho, known around the world as the Maracanã. Built for the 1950 World Cup and at the time the largest stadium in the world, it became an instant national landmark, a symbol of Brazil’s soccer-centric culture.

Read the full article in the New York Times