PLAS Concentrator Sofia Quinodoz ’13 – Studying the unseen activity in bacteria chatter and a nation’s bereavement

Article from Princeton University’s News at Princeton; by Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications

Photos by Denise Applewhite

In some ways, both of the theses Princeton University senior Sofia Quinodoz took on pertain to an unseen and not fully understood action that is nonetheless felt by those it afflicts, be it in the form of an infection or the void of a loved one suddenly erased.

As a molecular biology major, her primary thesis involves uncovering how bacteria communicate to coordinate group behaviors, such as their activity inside a host organism.

The thesis for her certificate in Latin American studies focuses on how Argentine families remember through Continue reading

Student Trip to Guatemala – December 2012

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During December 2012 five Princeton undergraduate students enrolled in LAS 401 Latin American Studies: The Politics of Ethnicity in Latin America traveled to Guatemala.  This trip, led by Professor Timothy J. Smith (Visiting Research Scholar in PLAS and Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology and PLAS), was sponsored with the generous support of PLAS, the Department of Anthropology and the Fred Fox Fund.  Continue reading

Dale winner, Flora Thomson-DeVeaux ’13, to follow writer’s footsteps across the Americas

Flora Thomson-DeVeaux

Flora Thomson-DeVeaux

Princeton University senior Flora Thomson-DeVeaux has met Santiago Badariotti Merlo again and again, in her courses and in her travels, though their paths have never crossed in real time.

Now Thomson-DeVeaux, the 2013 winner of the Martin Dale Fellowship, will spend the next year tracing the butler and writer’s footsteps across the Americas. She will delve deeper into his life and writing, which intersect with several themes over the course of the 20th century — the rise and decline of two of Latin America’s biggest cities, economic and class history, and attitudes about homosexuality. She plans to turn her senior thesis on Badariotti Merlo, who was born in 1912 and died in 1994, into a full-length book.

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Three students win Labouisse Prize for projects in Sierra Leone and Brazil

Courtney Crumpler

Courtney Crumpler

Three Princeton University seniors have been awarded the Henry Richardson Labouisse ’26 Prize to spend one year pursuing international civic engagement projects after graduation. The $30,000 prize will support a joint initiative by Shirley Gao and Raphael Frankfurter in Sierra Leone, and a project by Courtney Crumpler in Brazil.

The award to Gao and Frankfurter will aid their work to develop a maternal health coordination center in eastern Sierra Leone. Crumpler’s prize will support her efforts to bolster community organizing in underserved communities in Rio de Janeiro in advance of the 2014 World Cup finals and 2016 Olympics there.

The Labouisse Prize enables graduating seniors to engage in a project that exemplifies the life and work of Henry Richardson Labouisse, a 1926 Princeton graduate who was a diplomat, international public servant and champion for the causes of international justice and international development. The prize was established in 1984 by Labouisse’s daughter and son-in-law, Anne and Martin Peretz.

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News from Firestone Library

From Ñ

Fernando Acosta-Rodriguez,
From “Ñ”

Dear PLAS friends,

I’d like to share with you the link to an article that appeared this weekend in Ñ, the cultural supplement of the Argentine daily Clarín.  It’s titled “La memoria de la literatura latinoamericana” and highlights Firestone Library’s extensive collection of archives, correspondence, manuscripts and other materials by Latin American and Caribbean authors and intellectuals. 

Also in the issue is a text by Rubén Gallo about Severo Sarduy in Princeton, entitled “Un cubano en Princeton.”

For additional information about Latin American special collections at Princeton, please visit http://libguides.princeton.edu/latinam_iberian_primary.

Fernando Acosta Rodriguez
Librarian for Latin American Studies, Firestone Library
Princeton University

João Biehl, PLAS Associated Faculty Member, to Receive Staley Prize

Joao_Biehl-m1João Biehl, the Susan Dod Brown Professor of Anthropology, has been selected to receive the 2013 J.I. Staley Prize for his book “Vita: Life in a Zone of Social Abandonment.” The prize is given annually by the School for Advanced Research for a book that represents the best writing and scholarship in anthropology. The Staley Prize panel called the work “a landmark of anthropological writing, humanizing in the most literal sense.” Biehl, who also co-directs the Program in Global Health and Health Policy, will receive the prize, which is accompanied by a $10,000 award, on Nov. 21 at the meetings of American Anthropological Association in Chicago.
(From http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S36/18/21Q32/index.xml?section=people)

Laura Gandolfi – One of four to win Jacobus Fellowship, top graduate student honor

Photo by Tommy AgostiniPrinceton University graduate students Angéle Christin, Laura Gandolfi, George Young and Jiaying Zhao have been named co-winners of the Porter Ogden Jacobus Fellowship, Princeton’s top honor for graduate students. The fellowships support the final year of study at Princeton and are awarded to students whose work has exhibited the highest scholarly excellence. 

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Exciting Spring 2013 Course by James Green

James N. GreenJames N. Green is Professor of History and Brazilian Studies and a specialist on modern Brazilian history. As a young adventurer he traveled to Latin America with the plan to stay in Brazil for six months and ended up staying six years. There he participated in the opposition to the military regime and was a founder of the LGBT movement. After many other careers, he returned to academia to get a doctorate in Latin American history at UCLA. He has published two award-winning books, Beyond Carnival: Male Homosexuality in Twentieth-Century Brazil and We Cannot Remain Silent: Opposition to the Brazilian Military Dictatorship in the United States. He has served as the President of the Brazilian Studies Association and is currently working as a consultant with the Brazilian National Truth Commission that is investigating the State’s violation of human rights during the military dictatorship. He is currently working on a biography of Herbert Daniel (1946-92), a former guerrilla fighter, alongside Brazil’s current president Dilma Rousseff, political exile, and AIDS activist.

In Spring 2013 he will be teaching:
LAS 403 Latin American Studies Seminar – Politics/Culture During the Brazilian Military Dictatorship
This seminar focuses on the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that took place in Brazil during the civilian-military dictatorship that ruled the country from 1964-85. Using primary and secondary sources, as well as films and documentaries, we will examine why and how the generals took power, the role the U.S. government played before and after the coup d’etat in Brazilian affairs, the multiple political and cultural forms of opposition that emerged to challenge authoritarian rule, the process that led to democratization, and Brazil’s new role as a global player and an economic powerhouse. Prerequisites and Restrictions: This course is open to undergraduate students and graduate students who fulfill one of the following requirements: (a) the student has intermediate knowledge of Portuguese; (b) the student has taken at least one previous course in modern Latin American history or a class related to Brazil; (c) the student has spent time in Brazil; (d) the student is convincingly motivated to learn about recent Brazilian history.
Schedule: S01 1:30pm-4:20 Th.

PLAS Home Page
PLAS Spring ’13 Course List

Princeton’s João Biehl explores consequences of Brazil’s constitutional right to health

In 2010, Edgar Lemos, a retired bus driver in Porto Alegre, Brazil, sued his government for failing to provide medication to treat his neurological disorder. It was his privilege to do so: Brazil and more than 100 other nations grant the right to health, which in Brazil has given rise to numerous lawsuits against the government for access to medicines of all kinds.

Princeton University anthropology professor João Biehl has documented the emergence of right-to-health litigation in that country over the past decade. Through visits to courtrooms and clinics to meet patients and record their stories, combined with rigorous evaluation of medical and legal data, Biehl, a native of Brazil, and his research team have created a detailed picture of who sues for treatment and why in this country of about 200 million people and an economy on the rise.

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