The BiblioFiles Presents: Platte F. Clark

platte f clarkJust posted! An in-depth interview with Platte E. Clark, author of Bad Unicorn and its newly-released sequel, Fluff Dragon.

Max Spencer, middle school student, is about to have a very unusual day. It begins when he drags an old book from under his bed to use for a last-minute book report. Unbeknownst to Max, this book is the legendary Codex of Infinite Knowability, the most powerful book in three worlds, and Max is a descendent of Maximilian Sporazo, the book’s creator. Right now, however, Max is just hoping to avoid the school bully, Ricky “The Kracken” Reynolds, and hang out with Dirk, his hyperactive, game-obsessed best friend.

When Max unknowingly unleashes a spell from the Codex, he transports himself, Dirk, a girl named Sarah, and a disgruntled dwarf named Dwight into a future where humans are extinct and machines have taken over. It’s going to take more than Glenn, the Legendary Dagger of Motivation, to get them out of this mess. As if that isn’t bad enough, Max and his companions are being hunted by a unicorn. A bad unicorn. A nasty, petulant, human-eating unicorn. Princess the Destroyer has agreed to find Max and the Codex in exchange for an all-the-humans-you-can-eat rampage in Texas.

Bad Unicorn is irreverent, ironical, and completely hilarious. Clark composes an epic tale of good versus evil complete with nods to Dungeons & Dragons, computer games, malevolent sci-fi robots, zombies, and 80s arcade games. There’s even a dash of geek romance and an explanation of the true purpose of jackaolopes. Bad Unicorn has it all. The second book in the trilogy, Fluff Dragon, was released last month.

Ready to check it out? Follow this link to get to the BiblioFiles!

Sneak Peek: Cinderella Story

dress on stairsCinderella’s fairy godmother managed to do wonders with rags, rats, mice, lizards and a pumpkin. Local high school artist Vicky Gebert produced something just as miraculous with plastic bags, forks, chicken wire, bubble wrap, and drinking straws!

bodiceWorking over the course of 25 hours, Vicky used wire cutters, hot glue, and scissors to sculpt the dress into existence. In total, she used 5 feet of bubble wrap, 30 trashcan liners, 60 straws, 100 t-shirt bags, 25 forks, 25 feet of plastic blue lace print, 1 Styrofoam box, and 5 feet of chicken wire.

This dress is the centerpiece of a “Cinderella Story” program we’ll be hosting in April. A slew of young stylists (ages 3 – 10) will design and model their own dresses constructed of different materials. In addition to exhibiting her creation, Vicky will be on hand at the program to answer questions and lend her “fairy godmother” artistic talents. I’ll definitely post pictures in April. But I couldn’t resist a little sneak peek today…

dress in archPhotos by Minjie Chen

The BiblioFiles Presents: Candace Fleming

candace flemingJust posted! An in-depth audio interview with author Candace Fleming.

Her award-winning biographies for children include Ben Franklin’s Almanac: Being a True Account of the Good Gentleman’s Life; Our Eleanor: A Scrapbook Look at Eleanor Roosevelt’s Remarkable Life; The Lincolns: A Scrapbook Look at Abraham and Mary; The Great and Only Barnum: The Tremendous, Stupendous Life of Showman P.T. Barnum; and Amelia Lost: The Life and Disappearance of Amelia Earhart.

Candace discusses her research process, her pursuit of primary sources, her philosophy on writing difficult material for young audiences and…my personal favorite…her surprising answer to people who think that reading biographies is boring!

The interview streams on Cotsen’s website, click here to listen.


Author photo by Michael Lionstar