Oh So Crafty

box and tubeWhat do you get when you decorate 1 plain box and 1 toilet paper tube roll with a plethora of art supplies? Clearly, some very clever crafting!

creative charactersFor our story time project, we started everyone with a 4″ x 4″ x 4″ box and a toilet paper tube. Then we asked the kids to use the tube to create a doll, and the box to make an accessory for the doll. Helping themselves to tables loaded with art supplies, our imaginative inventors went to work!

We read Crafty Chloe, written by Kelly DiPucchio, and illustrated by Heather Ross (Atheneum Books, 2012). Chloe may not be good at sports, video games, or dance, but she is an absolute genius at crafting. Chloe’s creativity is challenged, however, when it comes time to find a birthday present for her best friend Emma. More than anything, Emma wants a Violet doll, but when Chloe goes to purchase one, she finds that London, a snooty classmate, has beaten her to the purchase. Rattled, Chloe tells London she’s going to make Emma’s present. London’s response is derisive (“You’re going to MAKE her something?”). The big day arrives, but, on her way to the shindig, London trips on her glittery heels. She drops Violet in a muddy puddle, and, to add insult to injury, the doll’s dress is ripped off by London’s dog. Instead of leaving London to her awful fate, Chloe unveils her present. It’s a handmade purple dolly dress that fits Violet perfectly. Also in the gift box? A color-coordinated canopy bed for Violet. Perfect.

I love this book on so many levels, and not just because of the super sweet hot glue gun holster Chloe wears while she’s crafting her masterpieces.

You’ll need:

  • 1 box (mine was 4″ x 4″ x 4″ but any size will work)
  • 1 toilet paper tube
  • A selection of multicultural construction paper for skin
  • Black, brown, yellow, and red construction paper for hair
  • Assorted craft supplies (see our complete list a little later in this post)
  • A Bling Bin
  • Scissors, tape, and glue sticks for construction
  • Markers for decorating
  • Hot glue

As I mentioned in the introduction, the projects all started with the same box. Here’s a look at how we cut them down in various ways.

project boxesFor this particular project, it’s important to create a few example projects to put on display. Example projects are helpful for craft-challenged parents and caretakers, and they also help kids who have trouble brainstorming. The only drawback, of course, is that some kids just want to recreate your projects. I mean, who wouldn’t be tempted to recreate Vivian Ward shopping on Rodeo Drive?

pretty womanAhem. As far as art supplies, we offered colored masking tape, felt pieces, twisteez wire, a selection of small feathers, 3 sizes of pom-poms, colored macaroni, mesh tubing, large plastic buttons, seashells, bubble tea straws, self-adhesive foam shapes, construction paper, embossed foil paper, patterned paper, white poster board, tagboard, a selection of tissue paper, cellophane, pipe cleaners, sparkle stems, plastic sample cups with lids, fabric flowers, balloon stick cups, and iridescent fabric shapes. And the Bling Bin of course.

OK…ready to see some crafting awesomeness?

mermaid 3tiger housegirl with carninja turtles 2mermaid 2batman 2sea creaturesponge bobshopping 1ninja turtles 1beach girlbatman 1ninja turtles 3marioshopping 2batman 3mermaid 1Alas, a few projects did get away without being photographed. There was another mermaid, a butterfly princess, Queen Elsa, and a football field with pom-pom fans swarming the goal post.

Mammoth Haircut

mammoth haircutWhat’s a woolly mammoth to do when the Ice Age starts to warm up? Get a haircut of course! We made some spectacularly hairy mammoths, gave them drastic full body haircuts, and then played a little game called “Cold! Hot! Cold!” There were lots of giggles, I assure you.

We read Hot Hot Hot by Neal Layton (Candlewick Press, 2004). Oscar and Arabella are a pair of playful woolly mammoths. While the Ice Age winter is wonderful (Snow! Ice! Freezing winds!), eventually summer arrives and the misery begins. Plants and flowers make Oscar and Arabella sneeze, insects irritate them, dust itches them, and the burning hot sun is just awful. The mammoths try seeking shade, fanning themselves, and jumping in a lake but nothing works. Finally, they decide to give each other haircuts. Ahhhh! That works! The other animals decide follow their lead and everyone is much more comfortable. When winter returns, the animals grow their heavy coats back, no problem. Except early man. He’s looking mighty chilly at the end of the book!

You’ll need:

  • 1 box (mine was 4 ½” X 4 ½” x 9” – a large tissue box works too)
  • 8 rectangles of brown construction paper (approximately 3″ x 6.25″)
  • 4 toilet paper tubes, all of which are the same height
  • 1 rectangle of white construction paper (approximately 4″ x 13.5″)
  • A small rectangle of tagboard for the tail (or brown poster board)
  • A rectangle of tagboard for trunk (approximately 1.5″ x 7″)
  • 2 circles of white poster board for eyes (mine were 1.25″ in diameter)
  • 2 rectangles of white poster board for mammoth tusks
  • 2 small tagboard squares for ears
  • 1 piece of 12″ x 18″ brown construction paper
  • 4 pieces of brown yarn (approximately 19″ long each)
  • 1 piece of 9″ x 12″ brown construction paper
  • A 17.5″ piece of brown yarn
  • Scissors and tape for construction (glue stick optional)
  • Markers for decorating
  • Hot glue

We built our mammoths from the legs up! Begin by fringing 8 rectangles of brown construction paper. Wrap 2 fringes around each toilet paper tube, creating a double layer of leg fringe like so:

leg fringesWhen all the legs are wrapped, hot glue them to the bottom of the box. Next, use markers to decorate a rectangle of white construction like underpants (I went with classic red hearts look). When you’re finished decorating, wrap and tape the underpants on the rear end of the mammoth (note: the underpants will only cover 3 sides of the box – they don’t need to go all the way around).

legs and underpantsTo make the tail, fringe the bottom of a small rectangle of tagboard and tape (or hot glue) to the rear end of your mammoth. If you want to get extra fancy, you can attach a fringe of brown construction paper to the end of the tagboard rectangle like this:

tailNow for your mammoth’s face! The face consists of a pair of white poster board tusks, a curled tagboard trunk, a small pair of tagboard ears, and a pair of white poster board eyes. Tape (or hot glue) these items to the box. Two important things to keep in mind. Firstly, the ears need to stick out of the sides of the box, next to the eyes (otherwise, they will interfere with your mammoth’s “bangs”). Secondly, when drawing your mammoth’s eye pupils, aim for a surprised look. It’s much funnier that way.

suprised faceThe mammoth body is now complete, now for the hairy coat! Drape a 12″ x 18″ piece of brown construction paper over the back of your mammoth and fold the paper down the sides of the box. Then cut a portion of the front of the paper out, thus creating “bangs” over your mammoth’s eyes. Remove the paper and fringe the bangs and the sides of the paper. Finish by crinkling the fringes with your fingers to give the hair some volume.

first layer of hairPlace the newly-fringed paper hair back on your mammoth. Then tape four, 19″ pieces of yarn to the top of the fringed paper. Trim the yarn if needed.

yarn hair Next, drape a 9″ x 12″ piece of brown construction paper on top of your mammoth, fold down the edges, and fringe the sides. Crinkle the fringes for volume. Attach this second paper layer to the first paper layer with tape, a glue stick, or hot glue.

third layer of hairThe final step is to hot glue (or tape) a 17.5″ piece of brown yarn along the top of the construction paper hair, creating a dorsal stripe down your mammoth’s back.

dorsal stripeYour mammoth is done! Place the hair on its back, and then whip it off quickly for a surprise haircut! At our story time, we also played a game called “Cold! Hot! Cold!” Here’s how it works. Katie whipped up a pair of poster board signs, which she mounted on PVC pipe. One sign represented the hot summer, the other sign represented the cold winter.

hot and cold signsAll the kids sat on the floor with their mammoths in front of them. I held up the “Cold” sign and everyone covered their mammoths with hair.

coldThen I quickly switched signs and shouted “Hot!” and, in unison, the kids whipped the hair off their mammoths, revealing many multicolored pairs of underwear!

hotThen I switched signs again and yelled “Cold!” Down came the hair once again.

cold againWe started slow, but the game kept getting faster and faster until the hair was (literally) flying and everyone was laughing. There were about 18 kids at story time that day, so the effect was tremendous!

Looking for more hair projects (and who isn’t)? Check out this post!

The Famous Bucket

famous bucketPrior to 2007, if you had asked a young reader to name a famous bucket, I’ll wager most would have replied “Charlie.” But that was before a new bucket arrived on the scene. A fire-engine red bucket, wielded by an acrobatic young lady with a blonde ponytail. I speak, of course, of Kate Wetherall. Katie is one of the fantastic characters in The Mysterious Benedict Society, written by Trenton Lee Stuart (Little, Brown, 2007).

Intrigued by a curiously-worded advertisement in a local paper, orphan Reynie Muldoon spends a most unusual afternoon taking a series of strange tests. Later, he joins three other children (Sticky Washington, Constance Contraire and Kate Wetherall) who also passed the tests in unique ways. The children are invited to join a secret mission to stop Ledroptha Curtain, a criminal mastermind. The book is filled with puzzles, riddles, and action, but what I love the best is the friendship that forms between the children as their strengths (and weaknesses) are put to the test.

In the books (there are 3 in the series, plus a prequel), Kate always carries a red bucket stocked with a number of useful supplies. So when To Be Continued, our story time program for 6-8 year-olds finished the book, I just knew we had to something with Kate’s bucket! So I designed this game.

bucket gameAll you’ll need is 1 red bucket, a bucket game template printed on white card stock, and a copy of the bucket game scenarios. You’ll need markers to color in the template (or you can just go with the full color version), and scissors. I also gave kids a list of the bucket’s contents.

A quick word about the bucket. The 6.5″ bucket in the above photo can be purchased from Lowe’s for $2.35. However, since I required close to 20 buckets for my program, I needed something cheaper. I found a 4.5″ treat pail at Party City for 99¢. Nice! I also spotted 8.5″ paper bags at Party City for 79¢. Yes, a bag is technically not a bucket, but it’s a budget-friendly option nonetheless.

buckets and bagTo play the game, read a scenario aloud. Ask the kids to select the bucket items they would use to solve the scenario. Once everyone’s selections are made, go around the room and ask them to display which tools they selected, and how they would use them to solve the scenario. As you can imagine, there were some pretty innovative answers!

I’m a big fan of the Mysterious Benedict Society books, and in 2010 I was delighted to interview the author. If you’d like to listen to (or read) my interview with Trenton Lee Stewart, just click here.

Also, I don’t know if you noticed the amazing footwear on the two models at the top of the post (who also happen to be huge fans of the books). If not, scroll back up and prepare for some serious cuteness!