Read to Me

read to meGather round for a soothing bedtime story, but don’t be surprised if a Snatchabook decides to join you! This sweet little creature attaches to your shoulder with an elastic cord, and is eager to listen to a book you’ve written.

We read The Snatchabook, written by Helen Docherty and illustrated by Thomas Docherty (Sourcebooks Jabberwocky, 2013). In cozy Burrow Down, animals are tucking in with their favorite bedtime stories. But what’s this? In the blink of an eye, the books are vanishing! Rabbit Eliza Brown decides to get to the bottom of the mystery. Using a stack of books as bait, Eliza lures the thief into her house and…it turns out that he is a tiny, furry, sweet-faced, long-tailed, winged creature called a Snatchabook. Crying, the Snatchabook confesses that he’s been stealing books because he has no mom or dad to read to him. Big-hearted Eliza comes up with a solution. First, the Snatchabook must return all the stolen books (and he does so, very neatly). Then Eliza introduces him to all her friends, who in turn invite the Snatchabook to join them for bedtime stories anytime he wants.

You’ll need:

  • 1 small box (mine was 4″ x 4″ x 4″)
  • A box cutter
  • A 14″ piece of elastic beading cord
  • tagboard (or brown poster board) for the ears, nose, arms, legs, and tail
  • 1 mini  (mine was 0.5″)
  • A rectangle of brown felt (mine was 4″ x 5″)
  • 1 Snatchabook wings template, printed on 8.5″ x 11″ white card stock
  • 2 oval of white construction paper for eyes (approximately 1.75″ tall)
  • Black dot stickers for eyes (optional)
  • 1 piece of 9″ x 12″ construction paper, any color
  • 2 pieces of 8.5″ x 11″ white printer paper
  • Hole punch
  • A 31″ piece of ribbon
  • Scissors and tape for construction
  • Markers for decorating
  • Hot glue

snatchabookFor our story time project, we made a Snatchabook that attaches to your shoulder with a bit of elastic cord, and a bedtime story book (written and illustrated by you of course!). We’ll begin with the Snatchabook. Use a box cutter to cut a 0.5″ slit in the bottom of a small box. Thread a piece of elastic beading cord through the slit. If your box has a locking bottom like the one below, definitely close the bottom, but make sure both ends of the elastic are still sticking out.

elastic on boxYou might be tempted to tie the ends of the cord into a knot, but don’t do that just yet! Wait until you attach all the body parts and the wings. That way, you’ll have a better gauge of how heavy the Snatchabook is, and how tight your elastic loop needs to be.

Next, cut the ears, nose, arms, legs, and tail out of tagboard (or brown poster board). The size of these items will vary according to your box, but here’s the general look of my Snatchabook parts. You can color the parts with markers if you like.

snatchabook partsYou’ll notice that the tail is very long! Because the tail needs to curl around the back of your neck and over your shoulder, it needs to be looong. The tail you see in the above image is 16″ from end to tip, not counting that big curve. Tab the ears, nose, arms, and legs and attach them to the box with hot glue (or tape). Hot glue a mini pom-pom on the end of the nose.

Hot glue the tail to the bottom of the box, then reinforce the connection with tape. Since the tail will go around the back of your neck, it needs to stick out from the side of the box (as opposed to the back of box). Here’s an image of the tail placement, as seen from the underside of the box:

tailTo make the eyes, stick 2 black dot sticker “pupils” inside 2 ovals of white construction paper (or simply draw the pupils on with markers). Attach the eyes to the box with hot glue (or tape). Use scissors to cut 6 “furry stripes” from brown felt, as well as a tassel for the tail. Hot glue the felt stripes to the sides of the box, and the felt tassel to the end of the tail.

stripes and tasselFinally, cut the wings from the template. Fold each side upwards along the dotted lines, then attach the wings to the back of the box with hot glue (or tape). I had some old archival mylar floating around (ah, the perks of working in a special collections library), so I traced the card stock template onto the mylar to make transparent wings. You could also use iridescent cello.

wingsSit the finished Snatchabook comfortably on your shoulder and knot the elastic cord under your arm tightly. Curl the tail around the back of your neck and over your shoulder. Done!

elastic on arm

Set your new friend aside for the moment – it’s time to make the book! Place 2 pieces of white printer paper in the center of a sheet of construction paper. Fold the paper in half to make a book.

book step 1You can simply staple the book’s spine together, or you can go with a slightly more artistic version. If you’re going artsy, close the book and punch 6 holes in its spine.

book step 2Decorate the cover of your book, then and write and illustrate a story inside it. When that’s finished, thread a piece of ribbon in and out of the spine holes:

book step 3Then tie the ends of the ribbon together in a bow. You’re done!

book step 4Slide your Snatchabook back on your shoulder, find a cozy spot to sit, and read a book to your new friend!

Adventures in Art

paint setPainter’s palette? Check. Set of canvases? Check. Sturdy easel? Check. Brand new paintbrush? Check. Super sweet beret? Check! You’re fully prepared for some adventures in art!

We read I’ve Painted Everything! by Scott Magoon (Houghton Mifflin, 2007). Hugo the elephant is an artist who is about to encounter a massive existential problem. He’s painted everything. After hundreds of painting, there is nothing left to paint, and Hugo is out of ideas. Hugo’s friend Miles convinces him to take a trip to Paris. As the two friends explore the city, Hugo is artistically influenced by the things he sees (and the concepts are cleverly conveyed with elephant puns). But he still doesn’t know what to paint. Finally, at the top of the Eiffel Tower, Hugo has an inspiration! Rushing home to Cornville, he climbs to the top of the fire department’s tower and views his familiar world from a completely different perspective. All Hugo had to do was change the way he looks at things. From different mediums to fresh perspectives, Hugo will never run out of ideas again!

You’ll need:

  • 4 plain craft sticks (the larger ones work best – mine were .75″ x 6″)
  • 1 small triangle of card stock (with 2″ base and 3″ sides)
  • 1 small strip of card stock (approximately 1.5″ x 4″)
  • An 8.75″ x 13″ piece of tagboard (or brown poster board)
  • A box cutter
  • 1 piece of 8.5″ x 11″ white card stock
  • 1 small binder clip
  • 9 squares of self-adhesive foam in various colors (approximately 1.5″ x 1.5″ each)
  • 1 sharpened pencil
  • A small piece of brown paper lunch bag (approximately 2″ x 3″)
  • A large strip of poster board for beret band, any color (approximately 1.5″ x 22″)
  • A selection of colored masking tape
  • A selection of patterned tape
  • A circle of felt, any color (approximately 9.5″ in diameter)
  • A small piece of felt for top of beret (approximately 1.75″ x 2″)
  • Scissors for construction
  • Markers for decorating
  • Hot glue

The easel is the trickiest part of this project, so we’ll start there! It’s a slight modification on a craft stick easel I spotted in FamilyFun magazine many years ago. They used regular-sized craft sticks, but I found the larger craft sticks much easier to work with, and much sturdier. FamilyFun also used colored craft sticks for their easel, but I used plain wooden ones so the kids could decorate them with markers.

Since we had quite a few pieces to this project, I decided to prep all the easels in advance. Everything else the kids assembled themselves. To make an easel, hot glue the tops of two craft sticks together like so:

easel step 1Next, hot glue the base of a card stock triangle behind the tops of the sticks. Then fold the top of the triangle downward. This is the “hinge” of your easel.

easel steps 2 and 3Hot glue a third stick to the underside of the hinge. The top of the third stick should be just about even with the tops of the other sticks. If you put the stick too far up, the hinge won’t bend!

easel step 4Stand your easel upright and turn it around (it should now look like the image below). Hot glue a craft stick to the front of the easel to create a rack for your canvas.

easel step 5 and 6Finally, to keep your easel from collapsing, hot glue one end of a small strip of card stock to the underside of the rack. Fold, then hot glue, the other end of the strip to the back leg of the easel. Here are two views of the completed easel:

paper supportNow for your painting tools! To make a paintbrush, fringe a small piece of brown paper lunch bag, then wrap it around the eraser end of a pencil. Secure in place with colored masking tape.

paintbrushTo make a painter’s palette, cut a palette shape out of tagboard (or brown poster board). As you can see, my palette looks like a fat, lopsided lily pad that’s about 8.5″ tall x 12.25″ wide. Use a box cutter to cut a 1.5″ oval-shaped thumb hole near the bottom.

palette step 1Cut an 8.5″ x 11″ piece of white card stock into quarters (these are your “canvases,”) then use a binder clip to attach them to the top of the palette. Cut 9 squares of self-adhesive foam into irregular paint splotches, then peel and stick them around the palette (you can also skip the foam and use markers).

palette step 3Lastly, your beret! Decorate a long strip of poster board with colored tape, patterned tape, and/or markers. Circle it around your head and staple it closed. Hot glue a circle of felt to the top of the hat band. Don’t forget to hot glue a little felt piece to the center of the beret!

beretOnce we had all our tools, we embarked on our art adventure! I asked the kids to scatter to different areas of the gallery and sketch things onto their canvases using the pencil end of their “paintbrushes.” They could sketch something they saw in the gallery, or they could sketch something from their imaginations.

artist 1artist 2After about 10 minutes, the kids came back to the craft tables and used markers to color their sketches. Then, each kid selected his/her favorite work of art and displayed it on his/her easel at our “art exhibit.”

exhibitThe kids loved this project (and I made sure to cut extra canvases for them to take home)! But for me, the best part was seeing them in the berets. They looked so darn cute wearing them. But this little artist takes the prize! Oooo look at those baby toes!

artist 3Ready for more forays into fine art? Check out some Pop Art, learn to draw like an Old Master, or perhaps you’d like to take a stab at Impressionism?

Behold, Yon Shield

sword and shieldAdventure calls! But before you gallop off into the wild woods, arm thyself with a sturdy shield and magnificent foam sword! We made these as part of To Be Continued, our story time for 6-8 year-olds. The book we read? Igraine the Brave by Cornelia Funke (Chicken House, 2006).

On the eve of her twelfth birthday, Igraine’s biggest problem is that she’s never had an adventure and will therefore, never become a knight. But danger is about to descend upon her home, Pimpernel Castle. Osmund the Greedy and his castellan, Rowan Heartless, have declared war. They want to capture Pimpernel Castle and claim its magic singing books. Igraine’s parent (who are both tremendous magic-workers), could typically handle such an intrusion but…they’ve accidentally turned themselves into pigs while finishing Igraine’s birthday gift (an enchanted suit of armor). Now Igraine must sneak past an invading army, gather the ingredients for the reversal spell, and return to save the castle!

There’s also a Ancient Greek variation for this project. Just scroll to the bottom of the post to check it out!

You’ll need:

  • A 10″ x 14″ rectangle of corrugated cardboard (I used a cake pad)
  • A selection of
  • 2 strips of heavy-duty poster board (approximately 1.75″ x 12.5″)
  • Hole punch
  • A box cutter
  • 2 brass tacks
  • 1 shield emblems template, color printed on 2 pieces of 8.5″ x 11″ white card stock
  • 1 foam sword (more on that below)
  • Scissors for construction
  • Hot glue

First, use the colored tape to decorate one side of the shield. If you don’t want to use tape, simply use markers (or use both). Cut the desired shield emblems from the template, and hot glue them to the shield.

To make your shield’s arm straps, circle both strips of heavy-duty poster board around your forearm. Don’t make the straps too snug! You want your forearm to be able to slide in and out of the straps easily. Tape both of the loops closed, then punch a hole in the middle.

arm loopUse the box cutter to cut two slits in the front of your shield, right in the middle. Push brass tacks through the slits.

front of shieldSlide the holes of the arm straps onto the brass tacks, then open the brass tack’s prongs to secure the straps in place.

back of shieldFinally, use masking tape to cover the prongs and secure the arm loops.

taped shieldAll you need now is a foam sword, and you can find instructions to make a super easy (and super inexpensive) foam sword right here.

We did an Ancient Greek variation of these shields at a Lightning Thief event. I purchased bulk cases of 16″ cake circles. Kids used metallic ink pads, shape stamps, and metallic markers to decorate them. The arm straps were rigged in exactly the same way as the knight’s shield described above.

shield tableWe called the table “Story Shields” and used the art activity to introduce hoplites, the citizen-soldiers of Ancient Greece. A soldier’s armor typically included a helmet, breastplate, greaves, sword, spear, and a circular shield called an aspis or hoplon. Often, the shields were colorful and emblazoned with family symbols, tributes to the Gods or heros, or they bore the symbol of the hoplite’s city-state

We invited kids to design their own personal shields. The activity was wildly popular…we went through over 750 cake circles!

greek shieldLooking for more connections? Lightning Thief fans can try this game of Mythomagic, or these awesome pan pipes. Brave knights can find dragons, herbal amulets, or how about a comedic sidekick?