Online Access to Research in the Environment (OARE)

Netherland OARE programme registers 1500 institutions in less than three years – 18 May 2009

Research4Life has announced that the Online Access to Research in the Environment (OARE) programme has registered 1500 institutions since its launch in 2006, an increase of nearly 700 percent. Scientists, researchers and environmental policy-makers in 1,500 not-for-profit institutions in the world’s poorest countries will now gain free or low cost access to the latest environmental science literature from the world’s leading journals, books and databases. Research4Life is the collective name given to HINARI, AGORA and OARE, the three public-private partnership programmes of the WHO, FAO, UNEP, Cornell and Yale Universities and the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers.

OARE’s sister programmes, HINARI Access to Research Initiative and Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture (AGORA), have also shown significant growth. Established in 2002, registrations for HINARI have grown by 61 percent since 2006 so that researchers at 3,866 not-for-profit institutions in 108 countries now have access to over 6,300 medical and health journals. Registrations for AGORA (established in 2003) have increased by 77 percent since 2006, providing researchers at 1,760 developing world institutions with access to 1,276 food, agriculture, and related social sciences journals.

More than 150 publishers now participate in the programmes, including Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Springer and many university and society presses. Together with technology partner Microsoft, Research4Life seeks to help achieve the UN’s millennium development goals by providing the developing world with access to critical up-to-date scientific research.

Click here to read the original press release.

Common Chemistry — online chemical database for public

commchem.gif CAS launches free web-based resource for non-chemists – 15 May 2009

Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS), a division of the American Chemical Society, has launched a new, free, web-based resource called Common Chemistry. This resource is helpful to non-chemists and others who might know either a chemical name or a CAS Registry Number of a common everyday chemical and want to pair both pieces of information.

Common Chemistry contains nearly 7,800 chemicals of widespread and general interest, as well as all 118 elements from the periodic table. With the exception of some of the elements, all other substances in this collection were deemed of widespread interest by having been cited 1,000 or more times in the CAS databases.

While not intended to be a comprehensive CAS Registry Number (CAS RN) lookup service, Common Chemistry does provide access to information on chemicals of general interest. The CAS Registry Number is recognised throughout the world as the most commonly used, unique identifier of chemical substances. The full CAS REGISTRYSM database contains more than 46 million organic and inorganic substances. Research discovery and patent tools such as SciFinder and STN allow users to search the entire database.

Click here to read the original press release.

Source: Knowledgespeak Newsletter & CAS.

Note: Princeton University Library subscribes to the complete CAS Chemical Abstracts and Registry database — available as SciFinder Scholar.