March 2011 Archives

World Water Day March 22nd -- Nature Conservancy

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"Where does your drinking water come from?

A simple question, but how many people actually know the answer? Watch this video as we took to the streets to find out and then check out the results of our national poll.

In honor of World Water Day, today, March 22, we hope you take the time to get to know where your family's most precious resource comes from.

Locate your city on this interactive graphic to find out where your water comes from and how supporters like you help to protect that source.

At a time when the natural world is under increasing stress, our rivers, lakes, wetlands and streams may be the most at risk. Here are a few things you can do to celebrate World Water Day and ensure healthy water for you and your family for years to come.

·         Give a gift to The Nature Conservancy today to help support many initiatives including our Freshwater work.

·         Watch and share this video of my eight-year-old son, Luca, as he demonstrates how natural eco-systems keep water clean.

·         Share your favorite rivers and lakes photos to help inspire others to care for our freshwater resources.

·         Get tips on how you and your family can save water and share them with your network of friends and family through Facebook and Twitter.

You can also read about how the people of Palau are unifying to protect their water on a local level, and how this approach could be used to inspire collaboration in communities across the globe."

Source Nature Conservancy email, 3/22/11 

Environmental History Podcast -- website and podcast

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Environmental History Podcast

http://www.eh-resources.org/podcast/podcast.html

"Environmental History Resources is a fantastic website, maintained by Dr. Jan Oosthoek, an environmental historian based at the University of Newcastle, that explores how "environmental changes, often the result of human actions, have caused historical trends." The website features the award-winning podcast and the podcasts are available for visitors to listen to for the years of 2006 to 2010, with the 40th podcast episode on the lost wetlands of England posted in mid-December 2010. Visitors will find that each podcast episode has a good written synopsis that accompanies it, including literature cited, websites mentioned, and music featured, when applicable. Moving along, visitors will find a podcast in the "Podcasts 2008" section which addresses "Disasters, history and the cultures of coping". It uses the example of the Philippines, which has more tsunamis, volcanoes and earthquakes than any other country in the world, to show how "persistent threat and reality of disasters shapes the history, social and cultural development of societies."

Source: Wisconsin Scout Report, Univ. Wisc. Mar. 18, 2011

Nature Climate Change -- now online

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As a Nature Publishing Group (NPG) customer, we would like to let you know that with the publication of the first issue imminent, the first Nature Climate Change articles are now available free to view online, ahead of print. They are:

Letter
Nonlinear heat effects on African maize as evidenced by historical yield trials
David B. Lobell, Marianne Bänziger , Cosmos Magorokosho, Bindiganavile Vivek

News and Views
Agriculture: Weather dilemma for African maize
Maximilian Auffhammer

Books and Arts
Living through the storm
Mason Inman

March 1, 2011 -- "Geologic records that are millions of years old could hold clues to how the Earth's future climate would respond in an environment with high levels of atmospheric greenhouse gases, says a new report from the National Research Council. Through a "deep-time" climate research program, these ancient rocks and sediments could enable scientists to better understand how climate behaved during past warm periods and major climate transitions."

National Academies News 3/7/11


Environmental clean-ups around the country

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"EPA: Cleaning Up Our Land, Water and Air [pdf]

http://www.epa.gov/cleanup/

The Environmental Protection Agency has been cleaning up the nation's land, water and air for four decades, and there's still much work to be done. This homepage provides information about cleanups around the country, what citizens can do to help, and the EPA's long-term stewardship programs. On the homepage, visitors can use a clickable map to learn about cleanup information by EPA region or program. Moving on, visitors can also read about available cleanup grants and funding opportunities in different communities. The site also contains a glossary of EPA terms, and helpful cleanup publications, such as newsletters, "FedFacs" newsletters, and waste management documents that cover Native American reservations. The site is rounded out by an "Other Publications" area that covers brownfields and the latest work on Superfund sites."

Source:  Scout Report, Univ. of  Wisconsin, 3/4/11 

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