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Wangari Muta Maathai has died, in Nairobi, at 71

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Worldwatch Institute Mourns an Environmental Heroine

"It is with great sadness that Worldwatch Institute says goodbye to Kenya's Wangari Muta Maathai, an environmental activist and women's rights advocate and the founder of Kenya's influential Green Belt movement. Maathai was the first African woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize in 2004, for promoting conservation, women's rights, and a transparent government. In 2003, Worldwatch had the honor of interviewing Maathai and being in her presence in Kenya. She was an inspiration to our work and will be dearly missed."

 

Read: Worldwatch Institute Mourns an Environmental Heroine 

 

Source:  Worldwatch Weekly Newsletter Sept. 29, 2011

May 12 Report Release
America's Climate Choices
Keck Center
500 Fifth St., N.W.
Washington, D.C.

Speakers include host, Heidi Cullen, and Robert Socolow, Princeton University

For reports and videos visit: http://americasclimatechoices.org/

National Geographic: Environment website

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National Geographic: Environment

http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/?source=NavEnvHome

"The Environment section of the National Geographic website has so many photos, quizzes, blogs, games and news to learn from and enjoy, that visitors will probably have to make a number of return visits. For those with only a little time, visitors absolutely must check out the link "News Blog: Greatest Nature Photos" under the "Environment News" heading near the top of the page. There visitors will see several of the 40 greatest nature photos that were chosen by a conservation photography organization in celebration of Earth Day 2010. "Test your Earth IQ" quizzes on backyard birds, Yosemite, pollution, natural disasters, and going green will keep visitors plenty busy, and the quizzes are also a great way to learn something new. The "NG in the Field" section reports on the grantees of National Geographic grants. Some of the projects include, "Big Cats Initiatives", "Blue Holes Project", and "Quintana Roo Underwater Cave Project". [KMG]

Source: Univ. of Wisconsin, Scout Report -- May 14, 2010

Earth Day is April 22nd

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World Water Day March 22nd -- Nature Conservancy

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"Where does your drinking water come from?

A simple question, but how many people actually know the answer? Watch this video as we took to the streets to find out and then check out the results of our national poll.

In honor of World Water Day, today, March 22, we hope you take the time to get to know where your family's most precious resource comes from.

Locate your city on this interactive graphic to find out where your water comes from and how supporters like you help to protect that source.

At a time when the natural world is under increasing stress, our rivers, lakes, wetlands and streams may be the most at risk. Here are a few things you can do to celebrate World Water Day and ensure healthy water for you and your family for years to come.

·         Give a gift to The Nature Conservancy today to help support many initiatives including our Freshwater work.

·         Watch and share this video of my eight-year-old son, Luca, as he demonstrates how natural eco-systems keep water clean.

·         Share your favorite rivers and lakes photos to help inspire others to care for our freshwater resources.

·         Get tips on how you and your family can save water and share them with your network of friends and family through Facebook and Twitter.

You can also read about how the people of Palau are unifying to protect their water on a local level, and how this approach could be used to inspire collaboration in communities across the globe."

Source Nature Conservancy email, 3/22/11 

March 1, 2011 -- "Geologic records that are millions of years old could hold clues to how the Earth's future climate would respond in an environment with high levels of atmospheric greenhouse gases, says a new report from the National Research Council. Through a "deep-time" climate research program, these ancient rocks and sediments could enable scientists to better understand how climate behaved during past warm periods and major climate transitions."

National Academies News 3/7/11


Environmental clean-ups around the country

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"EPA: Cleaning Up Our Land, Water and Air [pdf]

http://www.epa.gov/cleanup/

The Environmental Protection Agency has been cleaning up the nation's land, water and air for four decades, and there's still much work to be done. This homepage provides information about cleanups around the country, what citizens can do to help, and the EPA's long-term stewardship programs. On the homepage, visitors can use a clickable map to learn about cleanup information by EPA region or program. Moving on, visitors can also read about available cleanup grants and funding opportunities in different communities. The site also contains a glossary of EPA terms, and helpful cleanup publications, such as newsletters, "FedFacs" newsletters, and waste management documents that cover Native American reservations. The site is rounded out by an "Other Publications" area that covers brownfields and the latest work on Superfund sites."

Source:  Scout Report, Univ. of  Wisconsin, 3/4/11 

NOAA's Lophelia II -- See/read her exploration accounts

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"NOAA Ocean Explorer: Lophelia II 2010: Oil Seeps and Deep Reefs [pdf, Flash Player]

http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/explorations/10lophelia/welcome.html

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has been documenting the field mission of its ship, the Lophelia II, since 2001. In the fall of 2010, the Lophelia II went to cruise around the Gulf of Mexico conducting important experiments and analyses looking into the world of the deep-water coral communities there. The NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation, and Enforcement sponsored the project. On the site, visitors can read their exploration and research logs, take a look at their mission plans, and also view a slide show of images from their work. In the November 3rd log, visitors can read about the final dive of this expedition, which took the scientists over to an area near the site of the Deepwater Horizon disaster. The site is rounded out by the "Ask an Explorer" section, which features answers to questions posed by curious visitors to the site. [KMG]

To find this resource and more high-quality online resources in math and science visit Scout's sister site - AMSER, the Applied Math and Science Educational Repository at http://amser.org."

Source:  The Scout  Report, Univ. of Wisconsin, 2/4/11

Climate-L.org becomes Climate Change Policy & Practice

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The International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) is pleased to announce the renaming of Climate-L.org as Climate Change Policy & Practice.

 

Climate Change Policy & Practice is a knowledge management project carried out by the International Institute for Sustainable Development Reporting Services (IISD RS) in collaboration with the UN System Chief Executives Board for Coordination. The features of our website remain unchanged and include:

 

  - news on UN and intergovernmental activities addressing the climate change challenge;

  - an iCal of upcoming climate change events;

  - guest articles by key figures of the climate community and UN leaders; and

  - policy updates

 

We are also continuing to produce the Climate Change Daily Feed, which delivers to our readers’ email boxes the latest news on climate change meetings, projects, publications and statements.

 

Our previous URL https://lists.iisd.ca/t/1066123/161501/1015/0/ will automatically re-direct you to the new URL for Climate Change Policy & Practice https://lists.iisd.ca/t/1066123/161501/2755/0/

 

To sign up to receive the Climate Change Daily Feed and to subscribe to the CLIMATE-L community listserve, please click here > https://lists.iisd.ca/t/1066123/161501/2756/0/

To subscribe to our free iCal of climate change events, please click here > https://lists.iisd.ca/t/1066123/161501/2757/0/

 

Please also visit the sister sites of Climate Change Policy & Practice:

 

SIDS Policy & Practice (https://lists.iisd.ca/t/1066123/161501/2758/0/

Biodiversity Policy & Practice (https://lists.iisd.ca/t/1066123/161501/2759/0/

Verbatim from Fred Stoss for CHMINF-L .  Change was announced December 6th.

Rare Earth Elements in U.S. Not So Rare

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November 25, 2010 18:47 

Source:  [DocuTicker] Newsletter 158

Rare Earth Elements in U.S. Not So Rare
Source: U.S. Geological Survey

Approximately 13 million metric tons of rare earth elements (REE) exist within known deposits in the United States, according to the first-ever nationwide estimate of these elements by the U.S. Geological Survey.

This estimate of domestic rare earth deposits is part of a larger report that includes a review of global sources for REE, information on known deposits that might provide domestic sources of REE in the future, and geologic information crucial for studies of the availability of REE to U.S. industry.

The report describes significant deposits of REE in 14 states, with the largest known REE deposits at Mountain Pass, Calif.; Bokan Mountain, Alaska; and the Bear Lodge Mountains, Wyo. The Mountain Pass mine produced REE until it closed in 2002. Additional states with known REE deposits include Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, and South Carolina.

+ Full Report

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