Tag Archives: digital humanities

The Productive Scholar: Trust & Identity Practices in Illicit Deep Web Transactions

Topic: Trust & Identity Practices in Illicit Deep Web Transactions
Speaker: Rachael Ferguson, Department of Sociology

Date: Thursday, November 6, 12:00pm – 1:00pm
Location: New Media Center (NMC), 130 Lewis Library

Co-presented with the Center for Digital Humanities

Lunch will be provided. To register for this session:
(Registration is not required for attendance, however refreshments may be limited)

‘Virtual ethnography’ is an increasingly popular method in Sociology and Anthropology. Researchers have examined interaction on various social media websites, taken participant observer roles in Second Life, and non-participant observer roles with organizations such as the hacktivist group known as Anonymous. This talk looks at how virtual ethnography can be used to examine online identity practices, focusing on trust and identity in illicit transactions on Deep Web marketplaces.

Rachael Ferguson is a doctoral candidate in Sociology. Her dissertation is a multi-year multi-site ethnography that examines order and interaction for participants in a variety of criminal enterprises, including sexworkers, bookies, drug gangs and dealers in the US, and the Mafia in Sicily. The book manuscript for this project is currently under review at the University of California Press.

Statistical Programming with R Workshop Series (Two Sessions!)

R is the de facto standard for statistical analysis in a wide range of disciplines such as 450985571v3computational biology, finance, sociology, political science and digital humanities. This two-part workshop will help participants to get started with R’s abilities, ranging from data structure to visualization. Designed for students without any programming experience, this course will better prepare you for introductory statistics courses and quantitative research at Princeton.

Part 1: Introductory Workshop in Statistical Computing with R
In the first session, you will become familiar with the R programming environment and learn how to work with variables, vectors and data frames. You’ll learn how to import data from a file, to filter it, and to extract summary statistics. You’ll then learn how to use the powerful ggplot2 package to visualize your data, including scatter plots, histograms and boxplots.

Part 2: Intermediate Workshop in Statistical Computing with R
In the second session, you’ll be introduced to R’s tools for statistics and exploratory data analysis. You’ll learn to use R’s built-in statistical functions to test hypotheses about your data, including computing correlations, comparing two samples, and performing linear regressions. You’ll then learn further methods of manipulating and summarizing data using the dplyr package, and learn the basics of exploratory data analyses.

PLEASE NOTE: The best way to learn R is to attend both sessions. The second session will assume students are familiar with both R data structures and the ggplot2 package. To meet the goals of each session, and out of respect for those who enrolled in both, the Instructor will not be able to review material for students not present for Part 1. If you absolutely must miss the first session, reviewing the material in Lessons 1 and 2 of the online course, and passing the corresponding interactive quizzes, would help acquire the necessary basis for Part 2.

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Teaching with Technology Innovators Series: As Easy As ABC: Digital Humanities in the Classroom

Topic: As Easy as ABC: Digital Humanities in the Classroom
Speakers: Bill (William) Gleason (Professor & Chair, Department of English), Andrea Immel (Curator, Costsen Children’s Library), Ben Johnston (Manager, Humanities Resource Center, OIT), Clifford Wulfman (Coordinator, Library Digital Initiatives)

Time: Tuesday, April 29, 4:30pm – 6:00pm
Location: 330 Frist Campus Center, McGraw Center Conference Room

Refreshments will be provided! To register for this session: http://bit.ly/TT-ABC
(Registration is not required for attendance, however refreshments may be limited.)

The collaborators behind the new Interactive Digital Archive of Rare ABC Books, featuring selections from the Cotsen Children’s Library, will discuss the vision, planning, and work of the project, which was supported with a course development grant from the Digital Humanities Initiative and has been integrated into ENG 385: Children’s Literature. They will also describe a special course component in which students receive training in the methods and materials of the digital humanities, including text encoding.

Bill Gleason is Professor and Chair of the Department of English. A specialist in American literature and culture, his research and teaching interests range from the 18th century to the present, with particular emphasis on the late 19th/early 20th century, and include popular culture, material culture, environmental studies, and the history of the book.

Andrea Immel, Curator of the Cotsen Children’s Library since 1995, organizes international conferences, gallery and virtual exhibitions, and acquires materials for the collection.  She contributed chapters to volumes 5 and 6 of the Cambridge History of the Book in Britain, and co-edited Childhood and Children’s Books in Early Modern Europe, and the Cambridge Companion to Children’s Literature.

Ben Johnston is manager of OIT’s Humanities Resource Center in East Pyne.  Since 2005, Ben has worked with Princeton educators, students, and researchers across the Humanities and Social Sciences to facilitate the use of digital assets, technology tools, databases, and digital video in teaching and research. Ben is also an active member of Princeton Digital Humanities Initiative.

Clifford Wulfman is coordinator of Library Digital Initiatives and Director of the Blue Mountain Project. In addition to many years’ experience with text encoding, Cliff has published numerous articles on topics in the digital humanities and is co-author, with Robert Scholes, of Modernism in the Magazines: An Introduction.


The Productive Scholar: Tools for Text Analysis in the Humanities

Text Analysis with NLTK Cheatsheet

Topic: Tools for Text Analysis in the Humanities170192449
Speaker: Ben Johnston

Time: Thursday, April 3, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Location: New Media Center, 130 Lewis Library, First Floor


A sequel to last semester’s ‘Tools for Text Analysis in the Humanities’, this session will give participants a brief yet hands-on introduction to NLTK, the Natural Language Toolkit. This extension to the popular Python programming language is geared specifically toward computational work with written human language data. In this introduction, we will use tools from this library to tokenize a corpus into sentences, n-grams, and words, create word frequency lists, view concordances, and do part-of-speech tagging. In doing so, this session will also serve as a very gentle introduction to the Python programming language. Absolutely no experience with Python or with programming is expected or required.

SESSION RECAP: Presenter Ben Johnston started by providing a contextual framework for this session which focused on Natural Language Toolkit (NLTK) and Python. He emphasizing the impossibility of actually learning Python in an hour, and the importance of those who have developed a sincere enthusiasm for the applications of digital tool with which they’ve become familiar to engage in ‘knowledge sharing,’ with peers and others. Knowledge sharing requires knowledge but not at the expert level. Digital humanists should be encouraged to share knowledge even while they themselves are still learning (as you will likely never stop learning). Doing so reinforces learning and helps build community–both important aspects of gaining competency in the digital humanities. Here’s an excerpt from Ben’s introduction: Continue reading

The Productive Scholar: Using Mechanical Turk and Qualtrics to Crowdsource Tasks and Surveys

Topic: Using Mechanical Turk and Qualtrics to Crowdsource Tasks and Surveys
Speaker: Alfredo García

Time: Thursday, March 6, 12:00 pm – 1:00 pmMech-Turk-Qual_PS3 copy
Location: HRC Classroom, 012 East Pyne, Lower Level

The idea of “crowdsourcing” has increasingly been used in a variety of settings. With the help of social media, we can now crowdsource funds, software coding, information, and a variety of other tasks. But how can a scholar put crowdsourcing to use in his/her own work? This talk will focus on using Qualtrics, an online survey-generating software platform, and Amazon Mechanical Turk (AMT), a popular crowdsourcing website, to field surveys and collect hard-to-get information. Of particular interest in this session will be the use of AMT for running experimental survey designs. (Free Qualtrics accounts arevavailable for Princeton University members through the Princeton Survey Research Center.)

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